UT Dallas 2012 Undergraduate Catalog

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Economics (B.A., B.S.)

Economists study how people make choices in life when scarcity limits what is available and the incentives to induce efficient behavior. They look at a society's financial, industrial, and labor organizations; its distribution of income and ownership rights; its governmental activities; and its political and economic philosophies, and analyze how these and other factors influence the goods an economy produces, the resources it uses in production, and the distribution of its output. They also look at how incentives affect decisions relating to human behavior, such as whether to obey the law, get married, or have children.

Economic analysis leads to explanations, predictions, and policy suggestions. How are wages and prices set? Why do some cities boom while others decline? Why do we have an energy crisis? How should we use our exhaustible resources? How will consumers and corporations react to a tax cut? How can the crime rate be reduced? If we are to use our resources efficiently, what antitrust and government regulations should be enforced? What can be done to reduce inflation and unemployment? To prevent excess pollution? To achieve economic growth? To distribute income more equitably? In examining these sorts of questions, economics helps us to understand more clearly the choices available to us and the consequences of our decisions.

There is an abundance of career opportunities for an economics major.

Careers in business include consulting, banking and other financial institutions, insurance, corporate strategic planning, real estate, journalism, management, marketing, and public utilities.

Careers in government include consulting, publicly owned utilities, planning and forecasting, regulatory agencies, management, needs assessment, legislative staffs, judicial agencies, and executive support.

Careers in the interfacing of business and government include labor arbitration, regulation, environmental planning, urban and regional planning, and interest representation.

Economics is an excellent preparation for a career in law.

Bachelor of Arts in Economics

Degree Requirements (120 semester credit hours)

I. Core Curriculum Requirements1: 42 semester credit hours

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

3 semester credit hours Communication (RHET 1302)
3 semester credit hours Communication Elective (ECON 3330, ECON 4332, or ECON 4382)2

Social and Behavioral Sciences (15 semester credit hours)

6 semester credit hours Government (GOVT 2301 and GOVT 2302)
6 semester credit hours American History
3 semester credit hours Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective (SOC 1301, SOC 2319, CRIM 1301, or CRIM 1307)2

Humanities and Fine Arts (6 semester credit hours)

3 semester credit hours Fine Arts (ARTS 1301)
3 semester credit hours Humanities (HUMA 1301)

Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning (6 semester credit hours)3

3 semester credit hours Mathematics (at or above the level of College Algebra)
3 semester credit hours Quantitative Reasoning (STAT 1342 or EPPS 3405 [recommended])2, 4

Science (9 semester credit hours including at least one course with a substantial laboratory component)

II. Major Requirements: 46 semester credit hours

Major Preparatory Courses (7 semester credit hours beyond Core Curriculum)

ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics5
ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics5
STAT 1342 Statistical Decision Making6
or EPPS 3405 Introduction to Social Statistics with Lab6, 4

Major Core Courses (12 semester credit hours)

ECON 3304 Basic Techniques for Economic Research5
ECON 3310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
ECON 3311 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 4320 Public Sector Economics

One of the following:

ECON 3330 Economics of Health2
ECON 4332 Energy and Natural Resource Economics2
ECON 4382 International Finance2

Major Related Courses (27 semester credit hours)

27 semester credit hours upper-division ECON courses

III. Elective Requirements: 32 semester credit hours

Advanced Electives (6 semester credit hours)

All students are required to take at least six semester credit hours of Advanced Electives outside their major field of study. These must be either upper-division classes or lower-division classes that have prerequisites.

Free Electives (26 semester credit hours)

This requirement may be satisfied with lower- and upper-division courses from any field of study. Students must complete at least 51 semester credit hours of upper-division credit to qualify for graduation.

Minor in Economics (18 semester credit hours)

For a minor in Economics, students must take ECON 2301, ECON 2302, either ECON 3310 or ECON 3311, and nine semester credit hours of ECON electives. Electives may be any upper-division course with the ECON prefix with the exception of ECON 4V97, ECON 4V98, and ECON 4V99.

Bachelor of Science in Economics

Degree Requirements (120 semester credit hours)

I. Core Curriculum Requirements1: 42 semester credit hours

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

3 semester credit hours Communication (RHET 1302)
3 semester credit hours Communication Elective (ECON 3330, ECON 4332, or ECON 4382)2

Social and Behavioral Sciences (15 semester credit hours)

6 semester credit hours Government (GOVT 2301 and GOVT 2302)
6 semester credit hours American History (HIST 1301 and HIST 1302)
3 semester credit hours Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective (SOC 1301, SOC 2319, CRIM 1301, or CRIM 1307)2

Humanities and Fine Arts (6 semester credit hours)

3 semester credit hours Fine Arts (ARTS 1301)
3 semester credit hours Humanities (HUMA 1301)

Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning (6 semester credit hours)3

3-4 semester credit hours Mathematics (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417)7
3-4 semester credit hours Quantitative Reasoning (STAT 1342 or EPPS 3405 [recommended])2, 7

Science (9 semester credit hours including at least one course with a substantial laboratory component)

II. Major Requirements: 54 semester credit hours

Major Preparatory Courses (12 semester credit hours beyond Core Curriculum)

ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics5
ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics5
MATH 2417 Calculus I2, 7
or MATH 1325 Applied Calculus I5, 2
MATH 2419 Calculus II7
or MATH 1326 Applied Calculus II2
or MATH 2414 Integral Calculus
STAT 1342 Statistical Decision Making2
or EPPS 3405 Introduction to Social Statistics with Lab (recommended)2, 7

Major Core Courses (15 semester credit hours)

ECON 3310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
ECON 3311 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 4320 Public Sector Economics
ECON 4351 Mathematical Economics
ECON 4355 Econometrics

One of the following:2

ECON 3330 Economics of Health2
ECON 4332 Energy and Natural Resource Economics2
ECON 4382 International Finance2

Major Related Courses (27 semester credit hours)

27 semester credit hours Economics upper-division ECON courses

Optional Major Core Concentrations (9 semester credit hours)8

Green Economics

One course from:

ECON 4333 Environmental Economics
ECON 4336 Environmental Economic Theory and Policy

Two additional courses from:

ECON 4320 Public Sector Economics
ECON 4332 Energy and Natural Resource Economics
ECON 4333 Environmental Economics
ECON 4336 Environmental Economic Theory and Policy

International Economics

Both of the following:

ECON 4360 International Trade
ECON 4382 International Finance

Select one course from:

ECON 3369 Political Economy of Terrorism
ECON 4362 Development Economics
GEOG 3370 Global Economy
GEOG 3372 Population and Development

Business Economics

Three courses from:

ECON 3312 Money and Banking
ECON 4301 Game Theory
ECON 4310 Managerial Economics
ECON 4340 Labor Economics and Human Resources
ECON 4345 Industrial Organization
ECON 4355 Econometrics
ECON 4385 Business and Economic Forecasting

III. Elective Requirements: 24 semester credit hours

Advanced Electives (6 semester credit hours)

All students are required to take at least six semester credit hours of Advanced Electives outside their major field of study. These must be either upper-division classes or lower-division classes that have prerequisites.

Free Electives (18 semester credit hours)

This requirement may be satisfied with lower- and upper-division courses from any field of study. Students must complete at least 51 semester credit hours of upper-division credit to qualify for graduation. Note: students may need more than 18 semester credit hours, depending on the mathematics sequence selected.

Minor in Economics (18 semester credit hours)

For a minor in Economics, students must take ECON 2301, ECON 2302, either ECON 3310 or ECON 3311, and nine semester credit hours of ECON electives. Electives may be any upper-division course with the ECON prefix with the exception of ECON 4V97, ECON 4V98, and ECON 4V99.

  1. Curriculum Requirements can be fulfilled by other approved courses from accredited institutions of higher education. The courses listed in parentheses are the most efficient way to satisfy both Core Curriculum and Major Requirements at UT Dallas.
  2. A Major requirement that also fulfills a Core Curriculum requirement. Semester credit hours are counted in Core Curriculum.
  3. Students wishing to pursue Master's or Ph.D. degrees in economics should consult their advisor about appropriate mathematics and quantitative methods courses.
  4. Three semester credit hours are counted under Quantitative Reasoning core, and one semester credit hour is counted under Major Preparatory Courses.
  5. Indicates a prerequisite class to be completed before enrolling for upper-division classes in Economics and Finance.
  6. A Major requirement that also fulfills a Core Curriculum requirement. Semester credit hours are counted in Core Curriculum above.
  7. Three semester credit hours are counted under Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning core, and one semester credit hour is counted under Major Preparatory Courses.
  8. Hours to be counted as part of major related courses.
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