UT Dallas 2021 Graduate Catalog

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Graduate Programs in Public Policy and Political Economy

Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy and Political Economy

75 semester credit hours minimum beyond the baccalaureate degree

Faculty

Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Patrick T. Brandt, Paul Diehl, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Jennifer S. Holmes, Clint W. Peinhardt, Richard K. Scotch

Associate Professors: Jonas Bunte, Simon M. Fass, Dohyeong Kim

Assistant Professor: Vito D'Orazio

Professors Emeriti: Lloyd J. Dumas, Murray J. Leaf

Associate Professor of Instruction: Karl K. Ho

Associate Professor of Practice: Teodoro Benavides

Mission

The mission of the PhD program in Public Policy and Political Economy (PPPE) is to prepare our students for professional positions in research, teaching, and practice in fields related to public policy and political economy, in both academic and nonacademic settings. We prepare students through instruction in social science and public policy concepts, advanced methodological knowledge, applied social research techniques, and professional communication skills. PPPE students and faculty are encouraged to promote an inclusive and diverse environment that is committed to continued scholarship and service.

Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to apply social science and public policy theories and concepts.
  • Students will develop competency in advanced methods of social science and public policy research and analysis.
  • Students will develop basic skills in professional communication appropriate to the public policy and political economy research and analysis.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house 24-30 computers each that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Admission Requirements

The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page.

The PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.2, a score of 160 Verbal and a score of 148 Quantitative on the GRE, or equivalent score on the GMAT, are desirable. Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

Prerequisites

While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in economics, political science, sociology, calculus, statistics, and research design.

Degree Requirements

The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page. The PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy requires a minimum of 75 post-baccalaureate graduate semester credit hours. Full-time students can complete the degree in an average of 5 years.

Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in their graduate courses in the degree program, and earn a grade of at least 3.0 (B) for all core courses. If placed on probation, students will have one semester to bring their cumulative grade point average to a 3.0 or greater. Any student who receives two Cs will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Students must complete the following:

  • 33 semester credit hours of core courses
  • 12 semester credit hours of field courses (six semester credit hours in two fields of the student's choice):
    • Development
    • International Conflict and Security
    • International Political Economy
    • Social and Health Policy
    • Business, Technology and Innovation

    • 6 semester credit hours area of specialization (in one of the fields of the student's choice)
    • A Methods Qualifying Examination in Quantitative Methods and Research Design
    • Matriculation to the dissertation phase
    • Successful completion of a dissertation
    • Successful completion of 75 semester credit hours minimum including electives

    The requirements are outlined in further detail below.

    I. Major Core Requirements (33 semester credit hours)

    Students complete a core sequence of courses as follows:

    1. Six semester credit hours of coursework in Government and Public Policy:

    PPPE 6347 Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics

    PPPE 6329 Ethics, Culture, and Public Policy

    2. Six semester credit hours of Theories of Political Economy

    PPPE 6301 Political-Economic Theories

    PPPE 6321 Economics for Public Policy

    3. Fifteen semester credit hours of Analytical Methods

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus-based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    Or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Students are strongly encouraged to take the calculus-based sequence, which is better preparation for the methods qualifying exam and more advanced methods courses.

    Students will also take at least three additional methods from a set of courses approved by the program head or director of graduate studies. Students may obtain a list of those courses from the program office.

    4. Six semester credit hours of Research Design

    PPPE 6310 Research Design I

    PPPE 6342 Research Design II

    Students may request that alternative courses be substituted in the core with the approval of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    II. Field Courses (12 semester credit hours)

    Students take six semester credit hours in two of the following five fields. The fields and required courses are as follows:

    Development

    Choose two courses from the following:

    PPPE 6354 Theories and Issues of Development

    PPPE 6335 Institutions and Development

    PPPE 6343 Global Health Policy1

    PPPE 6352 World Political Economy1

    PPPE 6362 Political Development

    PPPE 6363 Conflict and Development1

    PPPE 6367 Environmental Economics and Policy

    PPPE 6370 Political Economy of Natural Resources1

    PPPE 6371 Urban Development

    PPPE 6372 Faith, Ideology, and Development

    PPPE 6392 Practice of International Development

    PPPE 6359 Political Economy of Economic Development

    PPPE 6358 Political Economy of South and Southeast Asia

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    International Conflict and Security

    Choose two courses from the following:

    PPPE 6361 Civil Conflict

    PPPE 6369 National and International Security Strategies and Policies

    PPPE 6363 Conflict and Development1

    PSCI 6321 Proseminar in Comparative Politics

    PSCI 6319 Proseminar in International Relations

    PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

    PSCI 7318 Conflict Management

    PSCI 7330 International Conflict

    PSCI 7335 Theories of International Relations

    PPPE 7313 Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    International Political Economy

    Choose two courses from the following:

    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

    PPPE 6319 Political Economy of MNCs

    PPPE 6352 World Political Economy1

    PPPE 6368 Political Economy of Finance1

    PPPE 6370 Political Economy of Natural Resources1

    PSCI 6316 International Organizations

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    Social and Health Policy

    Choose two courses from the following:

    PPPE 6313 Human Organizations and Social Theory

    PPPE 6334 or GISC 6334 Workshop in Environmental and Health GIS/Policy

    PPPE 6340 Domestic Social Policy

    PPPE 6341 Health Policy

    PPPE 6343 Global Health Policy1

    PPPE 6350 Social Stratification

    PPPE 6356 Health and Illness

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    Business, Technology, and Innovation

    Choose two courses from the following:

    PPPE 6359 Political Economy of Economic Development

    PPPE 6365 The Innovation Economy

    PPPE 6353 Industry, Technology, and Science Policy

    PPPE 6368 Political Economy of Finance1

    PPPE 6373 Issues in Science, Technology and Society

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    Students may request that alternative courses be substituted in a particular field with the approval of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies. Moreover, students may, in consultation with the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies, define a new field provided that appropriate coursework is available and that a coherent research literature is identified.

    III. Area of Specialization (6 semester credit hours)

    The student takes at least six semester credit hours of additional coursework related to their dissertation topic. Classes will be approved by the Program Head or the Director of Graduate Studies.

    IV. Methods Qualifying Exam and Matriculation to the Dissertation Phase

    To advance to the dissertation stage of the program, students are evaluated based on a Methods Qualifying Examination (MQE).

    The MQE will cover course material from (EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods and EPPS 6316 Applied Regression) and/or (EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics and EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis), PPPE 6310 Research Design I and PPPE 6342 Research Design II. It is required that full-time (and 6 semester credit hours-a-semester part-time) students take EPPS 6313 or EPPS 7313 and PPPE 6310 the fall semester of the first year and EPPS 6316 or EPPS 7316 and PPPE 6342 in spring. The MQE is administered once a year in late April or May. Student performance will be evaluated as unsatisfactory, satisfactory, or excellent. Those failing the exam will be given a second opportunity to pass at the end of the summer. Those failing the MQE for the second time will not be allowed to continue in the program. Part-time students should seek to complete the required methods sequence by spring of their second year; courses noted above should be taken in the same basic sequence.

    V. Dissertation Seminar

    Students must register for PPPE 8398 Dissertation Seminar for a minimum of one semester after passing the MQE. The aim of the Dissertation Seminar is to assist students in the formulation of a dissertation topic, and prepare a dissertation topic for submission to a dissertation committee, and defense of the proposal before the committee. With the approval of the Program Head, the Dissertation Seminar can also be taken as an independent study course under the supervision of the student's likely dissertation supervisor. Students seeking advising concerning a suitable dissertation topic or appropriate supervisor are encouraged to consult with the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    VI. Electives

    Students take free electives in areas of interest to fulfill the 75-semester credit hour PhD requirement. No more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study (PPPE 8V01) may be taken, unless approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head. Students may enroll in dissertation hours (PPPE 8V99 Dissertation) in addition to additional coursework after a successful proposal defense.

    PhD students should note that they are eligible to receive master's degrees offered by the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (EPPS) while they matriculate toward the doctorate. These degrees include the Master of Public Policy and the MS in International Political Economy. Other EPPS master's degrees can be earned as well. Students interested in obtaining one of these degrees should consult the catalog requirements or the graduate advisor.

    VII. Dissertation

    The student completes a dissertation and must successfully defend the dissertation before a duly constituted dissertation committee, in accordance with the requirements of the University and the UT System.

    Master of Science in Cyber Security, Technology and Policy

    36 semester credit hours minimum

    Faculty

    Mission

    The Master of Science in Cyber Security, Technology and Policy is a degree program intended for individuals who will systematically analyze cyber security and technologies issues, implementation, and analysis, within an interdisciplinary and strategic approach, and according to the mission of the organization. Students will gain both policy and cyber security expertise needed to study and solve complex problems using innovative methods for existing technology on a societal level. This graduate program will fill a workforce demand focusing on policy making and policy analysis in relation to the cyber security field that is needed both in Texas and nationally. Graduates will be prepared for managerial and analysis positions in a wide array of professional settings in the public and private sectors.

    Objectives

    • Students will analyze the risks of vectors of cyber attacks, identify security gaps, and the pros and cons of different policy and security options.
    • Students will identify sector specific standards and policies regarding privacy, ethics and legal requirements.
    • Students will analyze the options that ensure survivability, resilience, and restoration of services and functions and demonstrate resourcefulness in investigating unfamiliar issues.
    • Students will communicate complex security and policy information, concepts, or ideas in a confident and well-organized manner through verbal, written, and/or visual means.

    Facilities

    Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house 24-30 computers each that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    On the Computer Science side, The University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) has established a strong education program in Cyber Security since 2004 with the establishment of the Cyber Security Research and Education Institute in October 2004. UT Dallas was designated an NSA/DHS National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Security Education in June 2004, as an NSA/DHS National Center of Academic Excellence Information Assurance Research in 2008, and received NSA's highly prestigious National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations in 2015.

    Admissions Requirement

    The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page.

    Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) (on a 4.0 point scale). GRE test scores are required with a verbal score of 156 and a quantitative score of 146. An application essay, letter of recommendation, and official transcripts are also required.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in statistics.

    Grading Policy

    In order to qualify for graduation, students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average.

    Degree Requirements

    The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page.

    Students seeking a Master of Science in Cyber Security, Technology and Policy must complete at least 36 semester credit hours of work in the program.

    Required Classes:

    CS 6303 Cyber Security Essentials for Practitioners

    CS 6305 Data Security and Privacy for Practitioners

    CS 6306 Cyber Security Analytics & Malware Analysis for Practitioners

    CS 6308 Cyber Physical Systems and Critical Infrastructure Security for Practitioners

    MIS 6330 Cybersecurity Fundamentals

    MIS 6333 Digital Forensics and Incident Management

    PPPE 6302 Political Violence and Conflict in Cyberspace

    or PSCI 6302 Political Violence and Conflict in Cyberspace

    PPPE 6303 Cyber Security Policy

    or PSCI 6303 Cyber Security Policy

    PPPE 6308 Governance and Auditing Essentials for Cyber Security

    or PSCI 6308 Governance and Auditing Essentials for Cyber Security

    PPPE 6315 Legal Aspects of Cyber Security and Cyber Security Ethics

    or PSCI 6315 Legal Aspects of Cyber Security and Cyber Security Ethics

    PPPE 6328 Capstone in Cyber Security and Policy

    or PSCI 6328 Capstone in Cyber Security and Policy

    PSYC 6352 Cognitive Psychology Essentials for Cyber Security

    Other classes may be substituted with the approval of the program head.

    NOTE: The following four classes (CS 6303 Cyber Security Essentials for Practitioners, CS 6305 Data Security and Privacy for Practitioners, CS 6306 Cyber Security Analytics & Malware Analysis for Practitioners, and CS 6308 Cyber Physical Systems and Critical Infrastructure Security for Practitioners) may be replaced by the following courses (CS 6324 Information Security, CS 6349 Network Security, CS 6348 Data and Applications Security, and another from a list of existing cybersecurity systems in Computer Science courses) if the student has met the individual course pre-requisites and if they are approved by the computer science program head.

    Master of Science in International Political Economy

    36 semester credit hours minimum

    Faculty

    Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Patrick T. Brandt, Paul Diehl, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Jennifer S. Holmes, Clint W. Peinhardt, Richard K. Scotch

    Associate Professors: Jonas Bunte, Simon M. Fass, Dohyeong Kim

    Assistant Professor: Vito D'Orazio

    Professors Emeriti: Lloyd J. Dumas, Murray J. Leaf

    Associate Professor of Instruction: Karl K. Ho

    Mission

    The mission of the Master of Science in International Political Economy is to offer an experience in interdisciplinary education and policy research through activities in graduate education, scholarly and applied inquiry, and professional service. Today, more careers increasingly require international knowledge and skills that transcend the confines of traditional disciplinary training. We prepare students for careers in research, teaching, and practice in a variety of both academic and non-academic public policy and political economy settings. The Master of Science in International Political Economy will develop students' critical skill sets to meet the needs and demands of the international diplomatic and business sectors. These skills include critical thinking, knowledge of multiple cultures and cultural contexts, rigorous research skills, and the ability to communicate effectively in an array of environments. Students will be prepared to advance careers in policy and data analysis, and administrative positions in government, the nonprofit and private sectors.

    Objectives

    • Students will demonstrate the ability to apply social science and international political economy theories and concepts.
    • Students will develop competency in advanced methods of social science and international political economy research and analysis.
    • Students will develop basic skills in professional communication appropriate to international political economy research and analysis.
    • Students will develop competency in analysis, evaluation, and research design relevant to social science and international political economy research and analysis.

    Facilities

    Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house between 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS, and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    Admissions Requirement

    The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page.

    The master's program in International Political Economy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) (on a 4.0 point scale), and a verbal score of 156 and a quantitative score of 146 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design. Students are strongly encouraged to strengthen their foreign language skills.

    Degree Requirements

    The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page.

    Students seeking a Master of Science in International Political Economy must complete at least 36 semester credit hours of work in the program. The program has four components:

    1. Eighteen semester credit hours of required coursework
    2. Twelve semester credit hours of prescribed electives
    3. Six semester credit hours of free electives
    4. Students must demonstrate a foreign language proficiency equivalent to two years of university-level study in one foreign language before graduation.

    Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in their graduate courses in the degree program, including core courses. If placed on probation, students will have one semester to bring their cumulative grade point average to a 3.0 or greater. Any student who receives two Cs will no longer be allowed to continue in the program.

    I. Major Required Courses: 18 semester credit hours

    All students should complete the core courses as soon as possible.

    Economic Theory Core

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 6321 Economics for Public Policy

    PPPE 6365 The Innovation Economy

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus-based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 6352 World Political Economy

    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 6319 Political Economy of MNCs

    PPPE 6335 Institutions and Development

    PPPE 6362 Political Development

    PPPE 6368 Political Economy of Finance

    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

    PSCI 6316 International Organizations

    PPPE 6370 Political Economy of Natural Resources

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 7V76 Policy Research Workshop in Development Studies

    PPPE 6310 Research Design I

    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis

    Students may request that alternative courses be substituted in the core with the approval of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    II. Prescribed Electives: 12 semester credit hours

    Students complete 12 semester credit hours of Prescribed Electives. These consist of:

    An area field in which the student completes two courses (six semester credit hours) in history, advanced language, or area studies courses that address a single region, including Europe, Latin America, or the Middle East/Greater Asia.

    A theme field in which the student completes two courses (six semester credit hours) in development, international business and public policy, or international conflict and security.

    Development

    PPPE 6354 Theories and Issues of Development

    PPPE 6334 or GISC 6334 Workshop in Environmental and Health GIS/Policy

    PPPE 6335 Institutions and Development

    PPPE 6343 Global Health Policy1

    PPPE 6352 World Political Economy1

    PPPE 6359 Political Economy of Economic Development

    PPPE 6362 Political Development

    PPPE 6363 Conflict and Development1

    PPPE 6367 Environmental Economics and Policy

    PPPE 6370 Political Economy of Natural Resources1

    PPPE 6371 Urban Development

    PPPE 6372 Faith, Ideology, and Development

    PPPE 6392 Practice of International Development

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    International Conflict and Security

    PPPE 6361 Civil Conflict

    PPPE 6369 National and International Security Strategies and Policies

    PPPE 6363 Conflict and Development1

    PSCI 6300 Proseminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations

    PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

    PSCI 7318 Conflict Management

    PSCI 7330 International Conflict

    PSCI 7335 Theories of International Relations

    PPPE 7313 Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    International Political Economy

    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

    PPPE 6319 Political Economy of MNCs

    PPPE 6352 World Political Economy1

    PPPE 6368 Political Economy of Finance1

    PPPE 6370 Political Economy of Natural Resources1

    PSCI 6316 International Organizations

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    International Business and Public Policy

    PPPE 6319 Political Economy of MNCs1

    PPPE 6359 Political Economy of Economic Development

    PPPE 6365 The Innovation Economy

    PPPE 6353 Industry, Technology, and Science Policy

    PPPE 6368 Political Economy of Finance1

    PPPE 6373 Issues in Science, Technology and Society

    IMS 6204 Global Business (2 semester credit hours)

    IMS 6212 Global Communication and Negotiations (2 semester credit hours)

    IMS 6365 Cross-Culture Communication and Management

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    Other policy related field areas proposed by the student and approved by the Program Head are possible.

    Courses in both the area fields and theme fields must have the approval of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies. Internships and independent studies may count toward either area or theme fields, with the permission of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    III. Elective Courses: 6 semester credit hours

    Students also select an additional six semester credit hours of coursework. Students may select courses from those courses not selected under Major Required Courses.

    Master of Public Policy

    36 semester credit hours minimum

    Faculty

    Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Patrick T. Brandt, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Jennifer S. Holmes, Clint W. Peinhardt, Richard K. Scotch

    Associate Professors: Jonas Bunte, Simon M. Fass, Dohyeong Kim, Banks P. Miller

    Assistant Professor: Vito D'Orazio

    Professors Emeriti: Lloyd J. Dumas, Murray J. Leaf

    Associate Professor of Instrucction: Karl K. Ho

    Mission

    The Mission of the Master of Public Policy is to offer students an interdisciplinary graduate education designed to develop skills for careers in which a solid understanding of the public policy process and the analysis and evaluation of public policies are essential. Students will be prepared for analytical and administrative positions and responsibilities in a wide array of professional settings in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors as well as advanced study for careers in research. Specific skills include knowledge of the policy process and related ethical concerns, rigorous research skills that provide students with an essential grounding in statistical and data analysis and research design, and effective communication skills.

    Objectives

    • Students will understand and analyze the principal policy making institutions and the ways in which they formulate debate and implement public policies at the national, sub-national, and local levels. Students will examine legislative, executive, and non-governmental roles in policy formation at different levels of government. They will analyze the ways in which the various institutions interact and set policy priorities. They will study policy implementation and the interrelated functions of levels of governments, nonprofit and corporate entities in policy implementation.
    • Students will learn and apply quantitative skills and economic theories to measure and evaluate public policies. They will learn when to apply appropriate techniques to complex policies. They will demonstrate an understanding of techniques to examine the preferred outcomes of policy alternatives to advise senior officials. Students will acquire skills in applying statistical measures of projected policy outcomes. Students will learn economic theories and acquire skills in applying those theories appropriately to establish policy objectives and outcomes.
    • Students will understand the role of and learn appropriate, rigorous ways to design research to increase knowledge of public policy and citizen welfare. Students will learn ways to quantitatively and qualitatively design research projects that address important public policy questions and concerns.
    • Students will learn and understand the unique role of ethical theories and behavior as it applies to the public and nonprofit sectors. Students will understand the ethical obligation of elected and appointed governmental officials to the body politic. Students will understand the functions of internal and public oversight of the formation and implementation of public policies.
    • Students will develop expertise in a substantive area of public policy and learn how to effectively communicate new findings and innovative policies to senior decision makers and the general public. Students will study one of three major public policy disciplines - social policy, health policy or the business-government relationship. Students will understand the theories and scientific principles that support these substantive policy areas and the ways in which those theories are tested. Students will understand how these policy areas contribute to the well-being of citizens to enhance the quality of life.
    • Qualified students are encouraged to consider the PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy (PPPE). Such students should meet with Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies of PPPE as soon as possible to discuss options.

    Facilities

    Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house between 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS, and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    Admissions Requirement

    The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page.

    The master's program in Public Policy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA) (on a 4.0 point scale), and a verbal score of 156 and a quantitative score of 146 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design.

    Grading Policy

    In order to qualify for graduation, students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average in their degree program's core courses plus an aggregate grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses taken in the student's degree program at UT Dallas.

    Degree Requirements

    The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page.

    Students seeking a Masters in Public Policy must complete at least 36 semester credit hours of graduate coursework in the program. The program has three components:

    Students must maintain at least a 3.0 (B) grade point average to graduate.

    I. Major Required Core Courses: 21 semester credit hours

    Policymaking and Institutions (6 semester credit hours)

    PPPE 6347 Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics

    PPPE 6329 Ethics, Culture, and Public Policy

    Methodology (Statistics, Research Design, and related courses - 9 semester credit hours)

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus-based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 6310 Research Design I

    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis

    Economics (3 semester credit hours)

    Choose one course from the following:

    PPPE 6321 Economics for Public Policy

    PPPE 6365 The Innovation Economy

    Research Workshop or Internship (3 semester credit hours)

    A PPPE Policy Research Workshop or internship or substitution as approved by the program head.

    Students may request that alternative courses be substituted in the core with the approval of the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    II. Prescribed Electives: 9 semester credit hours

    Students complete nine semester credit hours in ONE of the following areas of field. (Social and Health Policy, Security Studies, Geographic Information Systems, or Analytic Methods). All courses must be approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies.

    A. Social and Health Policy

    PPPE 6313 Human Organizations and Social Theory

    PPPE 6334 or GISC 6334 Workshop in Environmental and Health GIS/Policy

    PPPE 6340 Domestic Social Policy

    PPPE 6341 Health Policy

    PPPE 6343 Global Health Policy1

    PPPE 6350 Social Stratification

    PPPE 6356 Health and Illness

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    B. Security Studies

    PPPE 6361 Civil Conflict

    PPPE 6369 National and International Security Strategies and Policies

    PPPE 6363 Conflict and Development1

    PSCI 6321 Proseminar in Comparative Politics

    PSCI 6319 Proseminar in International Relations

    PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

    PSCI 7318 Conflict Management

    PSCI 7330 International Conflict

    PSCI 7335 Theories of International Relations

    PPPE 7313 Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    C. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    GISC 6381 (GEOS 6381) Geographic Information Systems Fundamentals1

    GISC 6384 (GEOS 6384) Advanced Geographic Information Systems

    And one of the following:

    GISC 5322 (GEOS 5322) GPS (Global Positioning System) Satellite Surveying Techniques

    GISC 5324 (GEOS 5324) 3D Data Capture and Ground Lidar

    GISC 6301 GIS Data Analysis Fundamentals

    GISC 6317 Social and Geospatial Science Programming Fundamentals

    GISC 6325 (GEOS 5325) Remote Sensing Fundamentals

    GISC 6363 Internet Mapping and Information Processing

    GISC 6385 (GEOS 6385) GIS Theories, Models and Issues

    GISC 6388 Advanced GIS Programming

    GISC 7310 Advanced GIS Data Analysis

    GISC 7360 GIS Pattern Analysis

    GISC 7361 Spatial Statistics

    GISC 7365 (GEOS 5326) Advanced Remote Sensing

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    D. Analytic Methods

    EPPS 6324 Data Management for Social Science Research

    EPPS 6346 Qualitative Research Orientation

    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences1

    EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis

    EPPS 7318 Structural Equation and Multilevel (Hierarchical) Modeling

    EPPS 7344 Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables

    EPPS 7368 Spatial Epidemiology

    EPPS 7370 Time Series Analysis I

    EPPS 7371 Time Series Analysis II

    EPPS 7386 Survey Research

    EPPS 7390 Bayesian Analysis for Social and Behavioral Sciences

    EPPS 7V81 Special Topics in Social Science Research Methodology

    Other courses as approved by the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    E. Program Evaluation (9 semester credit hours)

    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    PPPE 6V91 Evaluation Research (6 semester credit hours)

    PPPE 6310 Research Design I

    EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis

    Other policy related field areas proposed by the student and approved by the Program Head are possible.

    Students should consult the graduate catalog, and the Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies, for additional information regarding those courses that would best satisfy the "Prescribed Electives" requirement.

    III. Free Electives: 6 semester credit hours

    Students may select six semester credit hours of 6000-level or higher courses. Students may choose courses that are not selected under "Major Required Core Courses" to fulfill this requirement and may choose courses outside the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

    Graduate Certificate in Economic and Demographic Data Analysis

    15 semester credit hours

    The Certificate in Economic and Demographic Data Analysis may be acquired by graduate degree-seeking and non-degree seeking students. For the certificate, students must complete 15 graduate semester credit hours (5 courses).

    Faculty

    Professors: Kurt J. Beron, Patrick T. Brandt, Harold D. Clarke

    Associate Professors: Simon M. Fass, Dohyeong Kim

    Assistant Professor: Vito D'Orazio

    Associate Professor of Practice: Timothy M. Bray

    Required Courses (6 semester credit hours)

    Students are required to take:

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Prescribed Electives (9 semester credit hours)

    Students must choose at least three courses from the following:

    EPPS 6324 Data Management for Social Science Research

    EPPS 7318 Structural Equation and Multilevel (Hierarchical) Modeling

    EPPS 7344 Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables

    EPPS 7368 Spatial Epidemiology

    EPPS 7370 Time Series Analysis I

    EPPS 7371 Time Series Analysis II

    EPPS 7386 Survey Research

    EPPS 7390 Bayesian Analysis for Social and Behavioral Sciences

    EPPS 7V81 Special Topics in Social Science Research Methodology

    Other courses as approved by the PPPE Program Head or Director of Graduate Studies

    However, students should check with the Director of the Certificate Program or the program office for details as to the list of acceptable courses.

    Students seeking the certificate who do not plan to seek a degree should (1) submit an application and (2) an undergraduate transcript. No GRE score is required. Note: (a) up to 15 semester credit hours of coursework taken as a non-degree seeking student can be applied later to a graduate degree; (b) currently enrolled students may use up to 9 semester credit hours of courses required for their degree for the certificate. Non-degree seeking students interested in continuing their graduate education must formally apply to the University and their program of interest to be considered for admission.

    Courses for the certificate must be completed within a 3-year period with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.

    Graduate Certificate in Program Evaluation

    15 semester credit hours

    A graduate-level certificate program in Program Evaluation is offered by the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences. Students who complete this program have an opportunity to gain competencies in the design and implementation of program evaluations in fields such as education, health care, human services, criminal justice, and economic development. The Certificate in Program Evaluation may be incorporated into graduate degree programs in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, or may be taken independently by non-degree seeking students. Students pursuing the certificate program are normally expected to have completed undergraduate courses in statistics and in research methods. Students lacking appropriate preparation may be asked to take needed courses prior to admission to the program.

    In order to receive the certificate, students must successfully complete a total of 15 semester credit hours of focused study, comprising of three required courses in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (9 semester credit hours) and 6 semester credit hours of field practice.

    Faculty

    Professor: Jennifer S. Holmes

    Associate Professors: Simon M. Fass, Dohyeong Kim

    Required courses (9 semester credit hours)

    Choose one course from the following:

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

    And all of the following courses:

    PPPE 6310 Research Design I

    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    PPPE 6V91 Evaluation Research (6 semester credit hours)2

    With permission of the Coordinator of the certificate program, students may substitute appropriate courses from other offerings in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences or prior coursework taken at other institutions.

    Students interested in applying for admission to the Certificate in Program Evaluation program should consult the graduate advising office in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

    Courses for the certificate must be completed within a 3-year period with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.

    1. Courses that count for multiple fields can only be applied to one field, and may not be double counted in two fields for an individual student or may not count for both a field and a core.

    2. This is a two-semester long program evaluation project that culminates in a final report.

Updated: 2021-05-27 11:32:21 v8.5c2002