UT Dallas 2013 Graduate Catalog

Criminology

CRIM 5381 Themes in Criminology (3 semester hours) Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Consult with an advisor to determine the appropriateness for one's degree plan and specialty areas of study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 elective hours maximum). (3-0) R

CRIM 6300 Proseminar in Criminology (3 semester hours) Introduction to graduate study in criminology through exposure to topics such as academic publishing, formulation of research questions, writing of literature reviews, career options in the discipline, professional ethics, data literacy, and vitae preparation. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6303 Etiology of Crime and Criminality (3 semester hours) Examines the history of criminological thought incorporating the major works of such theorists as Bentham, Beccaria, Marx, Durkheim, Lombroso, Shaw and McKay, Sutherland, Becker, and Merton. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6307 Extent of Crime and Measurement (3 semester hours) This course will address problems in criminology. Examines the major data sources on crimes and criminals and the limitations of such data. Topics also include measurement issues and problems concerning research on the nature and extent of criminal behavior. (3-0) R

CRIM 6308 Victimology (3 semester hours) Examines risks and consequences of crime for its victims. Issues considered include victim-offender relationships, characteristics of victims, the nature of the injuries they experience, and criminal justice procedures that involve them. (3-0) R

CRIM 6309 Communities and Crime (3 semester hours) Examines the trends and sources of crime and social disorder across communities. The course emphasizes relationships among crime, fear of crime, neighborhood change, neighborhood responses to crime, and public policies. (3-0) R

CRIM 6310 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (3 semester hours) Examines youth crime, child victimization, and juvenile justice. Students learn the processes by which specific behaviors are identified as delinquent, the historical evolution of the juvenile justice, and current policies and practices. (3-0) R

CRIM 6311 Crime and Justice Policy (3 semester hours) An introduction to crime and the efforts to control crime through public policy. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6312 Legal Aspects of Justice Administration (3 semester hours) Examines key legal issues relevant to justice administration. Topics include contemporary issues in criminal law and procedure, civil liability, asset forfeiture, administrative discipline, constitutional rights of justice practitioners, employment conditions and standards, and sexual harassment policy. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6313 Corrections (3 semester hours) Examines the history, forms, and functions of correctional philosophies, institutions, programs, and policies. Topics include the structure and functions of prisons and jails, community corrections, intermediate sanctions, and the growth of correctional control in modern society. (3-0) R

CRIM 6314 Policing (3 semester hours) Provides historical, social and political analysis of the roles and functions of policing in America. (3-0) R

CRIM 6315 Violent Crime (3 semester hours) Examines the sources and patterns of violent offending across time and space. Topics include conceptions and typologies of violent crimes and offenders, victim-offender relations, and efforts to predict and control violent offending. (3-0) R

CRIM 6317 Courts (3 semester hours) Examines the objectives, institutions and processes involved in the adjudication of offenders. Topics address the structure and function of the judicial system and principal court actors. (3-0) R

CRIM 6322 Crime Prevention (3 semester hours) Examines situational, social, and legislative approaches to the prevention of crime and delinquency. Emphasis on theories, protective factors, implementation and consequences of these approaches. (3-0) R

CRIM 6323 Violence and Gun Control (3 semester hours) Examines the facts surrounding one of the most heated issues of our times: the relationship between guns, violence and gun control. The course provides a comprehensive criminological view of the topic rather than a political or legal one. Students will learn about evaluating evidence, the "stricter gun law" debate, flaws in arguments on both sides of issue, as well as tricks used by advocates to persuade people to agree with their point of view. (3-0) R

CRIM 6324 Correlates of Crime and Justice (3 semester hours) Examines the nature of relationships among attributes and indices at the situational and aggregate levels to various forms of crime and systems of justice. (3-0) R

CRIM 6332 GIS Applications in Criminology (3 semester hours) Examines spatial distributions of crime, criminals, and criminal justice interventions. Students conduct spatial analysis of point patterns and area-based data in studies of the locations of crime events and rates, offenders, police patrolling practices, judicial districts and community corrections and how they relate to physical and social characteristics of neighborhoods. (3-0) R

CRIM 6348 Drugs and Crime (3 semester hours) This course provides students with a survey of the historical context of the legislative initiatives that have been attempted to combat the use of drugs, the relationship between drug use/abuse and crime, and the public policy problems surrounding the control of drugs. (3-0) R

CRIM 6351 (PA 6351) Introduction to Homeland Security (3 semester hours) This course provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of Homeland Security, its origins and developing trends and challenges. Selected material from Congress, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Justice, local, state, and other government and non-government agencies will be studied. Examines both historical and contemporary Homeland Defense and Security issues. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6381 Issues in Criminology (3 semester hours) Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 elective hours maximum). Prerequisite: Consult with an advisor to determine the appropriateness for one's degree plan and specialty areas of study. (3-0) R

CRIM 6390 Administration of Justice Agencies (3 semester hours) This course focuses on the administrative structures, processes, and behavior in managing criminal justice agencies. The focus is on human and financial resources, organizational theory, decision-making, productivity, measurement and enhancement, organizational design, and ethics and culture in police, courts, and correctional agencies. (3-0) R

CRIM 6395 Contemporary Issues in Justice Administration (3 semester hours) This course explores and surveys classical and recent literature in criminal justice focused on various critical issues confronting the justice system. The course studies the trends, contemporary topics, and reform movements currently prominent in the fields of policing, courts and corrections. (3-0) R

CRIM 6399 Capstone in Justice Administration (3 semester hours) The capstone in justice administration is the culminating experience for graduating Executive MS-JAL students. Students integrate knowledge from across the criminology and public affairs curriculum in an independent, faculty-directed, semester-long applied research project. (3-0) Y

CRIM 6v01 Independent Study (1-9 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision for student's individual study of a topic agreed upon by the student and the faculty supervisor. Student performance is assessed by instructor as pass/fail only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated for elective credit (9 hours maximum). Can be applied for credit additionally at the discretion of the program on a case-by-case basis. ([1-9]-0) R

CRIM 6v92 Research Workshop in Applied Criminology (1-9 semester hours) Students join a faculty member in a group research project. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). Permission of instructor required. ([1-9]-0) R

CRIM 6v96 Master Thesis Research (1-6 semester hours) Students conduct masters level research project under the supervision of faculty. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R

CRIM 6v97 Internship (1-6 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision for a student's internship. Internships must be related to the student's course work. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) R

CRIM 6v98 Analytical Writing Research (1-9 semester hours) Students perform independent research under the supervision of faculty. May be repeated for credit. (9 hours maximum). Prerequisite: EPPS 6313 and EPPS 6316 or equivalent, plus a good working knowledge of OLS Regression. ([1-9]-0) R

CRIM 7300 Advances in Criminology Theory (3 semester hours) Examines contemporary criminological theories and the degree to which research has provided empirical support for explanations of crime and criminality. (3-0) Y

CRIM 7301 Seminar in Criminology Research and Analysis (3 semester hours) Examines a variety of quantitative methods and procedures used in criminology research. Students will plan and execute an independent research project. Working topic for dissertation and dataset is preferred. Prerequisites: EPPS 6313 and EPPS 6316 or equivalent, plus a good working knowledge of OLS Regression. Permission of instructor required. (3-0) Y

CRIM 7310 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Criminology (3 semester hours) This course is designed to be an extension to CRIM 7301. Quantitative research techniques not covered in 7301 will be addressed in depth as they apply to longitudinal and multilevel criminological research. Topics may include, but are not limited to, structural equation modeling (SEM), multilevel growth curve modeling, growth mixture models, panel regression, propensity score matching, and latent class analysis. Topics may vary by semester and may be tailored to fit students' research needs. Enrollment requirements: All students must have successfully completed CRIM 7301 with a B or better. Students should have a firm understanding of varying regression techniques, etc., prior to enrolling. Prerequisites: CRIM 7301. Permission of instructor required. (3-0) Y

CRIM 7342 Qualitative Criminology (3 semester hours) Examines ethnography and other qualitative approaches to studying crime, criminals, and criminal justice, particularly participant observation and informant and respondent interviewing. Topics include phenomenology, case study, in-depth interviewing, ethnomethodology, conversation analysis, historical methods, gaining access, sampling, data collection and analysis, and legal and ethical concerns. (3-0) R

CRIM 7351 Advanced Criminological Theory Seminar (3 semester hours) Topics will vary from semester to semester on various criminological theories. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 elective hours maximum). Prerequisites: CRIM 6303 and CRIM 7300. Consult with an advisor to determine the appropriateness for one's degree plan and specialty areas of study. (3-0) R

CRIM 7381 Special Topics in Criminology (3 semester hours) Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 elective hours maximum). Prerequisite: Consult with an advisor to determine the appropriateness for one's degree plan and specialty areas of study. (3-0) R

CRIM 8v01 Independent Study (1-12 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision for student's individual study of a topic agreed upon by the student and the faculty supervisor. Student performance is assessed by instructor as pass/fail only. May be repeated for elective credit (9 hours maximum for MS students and 12 hours maximum for PhD students). Can be applied for credit additionally at the discretion of the program on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. ([1-12]-0) R

CRIM 8v92 Independent Advanced Research (1-9 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision for student's individual study of a topic agreed upon by the student and faculty supervisor. Pass/Fail only. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. ([1-9]-0) R

CRIM 8v98 Internship (1-6 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision for a student's internship. Internships must be related to the student's course work. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. ([1-6]-0) R

CRIM 8v99 Dissertation (1-9 semester hours) Provides faculty supervision of a student's dissertation research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. May be repeated as necessary for credit. ([1-9]-0) Y

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