UT Dallas 2015 Undergraduate Catalog

Criminology

CRIM 1301 (CRIJ 1301) Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 semester credit hours) An overview and analysis of the major agencies, personnel, and decision-making points which comprise the criminal justice system. Includes problems and issues confronting legislatures, police, courts, corrections, and the community, as they respond to crime in a free society. Legal precedents guiding the decisions of criminal justice agents are also discussed. (3-0) Y

CRIM 1307 (CRIJ 1307) Introduction to Crime and Criminology (3 semester credit hours) Survey of the nature, location, and impact of crime in America. Includes historical foundations of crime, theoretical explanations of criminality and delinquency, the recording and measurement of crime, descriptions of criminal careers, crime topologies, and an analysis of public policies concerning crime control. (3-0) Y

CRIM 2306 (CRIJ 1310) Criminal Law (3 semester credit hours) This course will examine the statutory basis of crime, the legal requirements surrounding the establishment of "mens rea" and legally permissible defenses permitted under criminal due process. Emphasis is placed on both criminal statutes and case law. (3-0) T

CRIM 2308 (CRIJ 1313) Juvenile Law (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the statutory bases which distinguish delinquency from adult crime and the juvenile justice system from the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on the rationale for treating juveniles accused of crime differently than their adult counterparts. (3-0) R

CRIM 2313 (CRIJ 2328) Police and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the central issues of enforcing law and promoting public safety in society with emphasis placed on both internal organizational issues of police administration and external enforcement operations. (3-0) R

CRIM 2316 (CRIJ 2313) Corrections (3 semester credit hours) This course will provide an introduction to the history and background of American corrections and the fundamental theories of punishment and treatment. Emphasis will be placed on the policies, practices, and issues within the correctional system, the incarceration of criminal populations in jails and prisons, and the expansion of community-based corrections. (3-0) R

CRIM 2317 (CRIJ 1306) Criminal Prosecution and Court Process (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the processes and politics of bringing criminal defendants to trial. Topics also include decision making points and the constitutional system of criminal due process under which criminal law is practiced. (3-0) R

CRIM 3300 Crime and Civil Liberties (3 semester credit hours) The functions of the police, courts, prosecution, and corrections are analyzed within a context in which constitutional rights and civil liberties affect the functioning of the criminal justice system. Major emphasis is placed on the extent to which civil liberties and procedural rights constrain or limit the system's effectiveness in delivering crime control, while at the same time ensuring justice. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (3-0) T

CRIM 3301 Theories of Justice (3 semester credit hours) Survey of the basic theoretical rationales and perspectives concerning the concept of justice with selected readings from classical and contemporary theorists. (3-0) R

CRIM 3302 Advanced Criminology (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with an in-depth study of crime, criminals, and the reaction of the criminal justice system to both. It explores the interrelationships among law, policy, and societal conditions. The major focus of the course is theoretical explanations for crime and criminality. Prerequisite: CRIM 1307. (3-0) Y

CRIM 3303 Advanced Criminal Justice (3 semester credit hours) Analyzes the major agencies, personnel, and decision-making points which comprise the criminal justice system. Explores some of the major theories and research about the roles that the various agencies and actors play in the criminal justice system. Includes discussion of the problems and current issues confronting legislatures, police, courts, corrections, and the community, as they respond to crime. Prerequisite: CRIM 1301. (3-0) Y

CRIM 3304 Research Methods in Crime and Justice Studies (3 semester credit hours) Examines methods of crime and justice research. Topics include the nature of scientific inquiry, framing a research problem, choosing a research design, developing hypotheses, sampling designs, and measuring variables. Topics will be covered as students conduct their own study. (3-0) Y

CRIM 3307 Immigration and Crime (3 semester credit hours) The course emphasizes the practices and policies of law enforcement's efforts to control illegal immigration, including the relationship between illegal immigration and counterterrorism, as well as victimization experienced by immigrants. (3-0) R

CRIM 3309 Media and Crime (3 semester credit hours) Examines the media's image of crime and the criminal justice system. An emphasis is placed on how various types of media construct or perceive criminal activities, how the media influences public policy and shapes perceptions of crime as a social problem. Topics include crime news, films and television dramas depicting crime and criminals, the media as a cause, consequence and cure for crime and news-making criminology. (3-0) R

CRIM 3310 Youth Crime and Justice (3 semester credit hours) Examines the concept of juvenile delinquency as a distinct type of criminal activity from that committed by adults and assesses the distinct juvenile justice system that has evolved to handle children. Topics will include the historical roots of delinquency and the juvenile justice system, delinquency measurement, explanations of delinquency, and the socio-demographic correlates of delinquency status. (3-0) R

CRIM 3312 Drugs and Crime (3 semester credit hours) Provides students with a survey of legislation that has been attempted to combat the use of drugs, the relationship between drug use/abuse and crime, and the public policy problem surrounding the control of drugs. Topics include a historical analysis of the laws passed to control drugs, the relationship between drugs and crime, and a policy analysis of the alternative means available to deal with the drugs/crime problem. (3-0) R

CRIM 3319 Comparative Justice Systems (3 semester credit hours) Survey of the differing policies, practices, and procedures of crime and justice cross-nationally. Special emphasis will be devoted to U.S. / Mexico comparisons, while additional emphasis will be placed on such comparisons as U.S. / Canada and U.S. / England. (3-0) R

CRIM 3320 Homicide and Capital Punishment (3 semester credit hours) Examines the policy and legal controversies surrounding the application of capital punishment (i.e., the death penalty) as a punishment for homicide. Topics include capital punishment through history, U.S. Supreme Court decisions and contemporary problems with the application of the death penalty. The course will also analyze the nature, extent, and distribution of criminal homicide. (3-0) R

CRIM 3323 Violence and Gun Control (3 semester credit hours) The primary purpose of this course is the examination of facts surrounding one of the most heated issues of our times: the relationship between guns, violence and gun control. The course provides a comprehensive criminological view of the topic rather than a political or legal one. Students will learn about evaluating evidence, the "stricter gun law" debate, and flaws in arguments on both sides of the issue as well as tricks used by advocates to persuade people to agree with their point of view. (3-0) R

CRIM 3324 Gender, Crime, and Justice (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of the role of gender crime and the justice system. The emphasis is on gender differences in the commission of crime and the types of crimes committed, criminal justice processing, and the employment of women in the criminal justice professions. (3-0) T

CRIM 3325 Victimology (3 semester credit hours) Analyzes the major perspectives on victimization. The emphasis is on patterns of victimization, the role of victims in the generation of crime, and the experience of victims in the criminal justice system. Special attention will be devoted to: sources of data (particularly the National Crime Victimization Survey), trends, variations by demography and offense type and ways in which those variations may affect how criminal justice officials respond to particular types of offenses. (3-0) R

CRIM 3326 Victimless Crimes (3 semester credit hours) Examines public order crimes, which includes a variety of behaviors that are illegal yet generally perceived by those engaging in them to be legitimate, justified, and acceptable. Many such offenses are illegal only because the government has said so, especially public order violations where there may be no identifiable victim. The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the complexities and controversies that swirl around these offenses. Prerequisite: CRIM 1301 or CRIM 1307. (3-0) R

CRIM 3327 Violent Crime (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the etiology, enactment, and control of serious interpersonal violence. The analytic focus includes robbery, homicide, aggravated assault, sexual assault, state violence, and white collar violence. Prerequisite: CRIM 1301 or CRIM 1307. (3-0) R

CRIM 4311 Crime and Justice Policy (3 semester credit hours) In-depth analysis of crime and the efforts to control crime through public policy. Although crime is most often committed by private persons against individual victims, crime is a public problem and society's reaction to crime and criminals is one of the most controversial areas of public policy. Crime control, deterrence and incapacitation, gun control, law enforcement, and court processes are just a few of the areas in which public opinion and policy are in current controversy and debate. Prerequisite: CRIM 3302 or CRIM 3303. (3-0) R

CRIM 4315 Race, Ethnicity, and Justice (3 semester credit hours) Examines how race and ethnicity pose differential risks for criminal behavior in conjunction with differential justice system responses to crime and criminals in minority communities. Prerequisite: CRIM 3302 or CRIM 3303. (3-0) R

CRIM 4322 Senior Research Seminar (3 semester credit hours) Major concepts and principles of Criminology will be applied to the analysis of crime. Capstone required course for senior Criminology majors. Completion of all, or concurrent enrollment in, major requirements. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. (3-0) T

CRIM 4323 Communities and Crime (3 semester credit hours) Analyzes the sources, consequences, and control of crime within communities. The emphasis is on social and ecological theories of crime, and on population instability, family structure, and the concentration of poverty as causes of crime. Community crime prevention efforts are also discussed. Prerequisite: CRIM 3302. (3-0) T

CRIM 4324 White Collar Crime (3 semester credit hours) Examines the criminality of individuals from higher social statuses, organizations, professions, and businesses. Also examined are individual crimes of trust (e.g., tax evasion, embezzlement, etc.) that are qualitatively different from traditional street crimes (e.g., burglary, robbery, etc.), but are not necessarily limited to corporations or individuals of high social status. Theories relevant to the etiology of such acts are considered as well as policies relevant to the punishment and prevention of white collar crime. (3-0) R

CRIM 4336 Introduction to Terrorism (3 semester credit hours) Examines the origins, nature, and operational characteristics of terrorist groups around the world. Students are exposed to a wide range of topics, ranging from the definition of terrorism to the unique characteristics of terrorist cells in the United States and abroad. Historical and contemporary terrorist attacks are explored within their context. (3-0) R

CRIM 4337 Landmark Supreme Court Cases (3 semester credit hours) Discusses important U.S. Supreme Court decisions and their influence in criminal justice. Special attention is given to the Bill of Rights and other key constitutional provisions of relevance in the areas of police, courts, corrections, and crime control policy. (3-0) R

CRIM 4396 Selected Topics in Criminology (3 semester credit hours) Topics include "Gangs," "Organized Crime," "White Collar Crime," "Criminalistics," and "Gun Control." May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

CRIM 4V97 Independent Study in Criminology (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a CRIM faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

CRIM 4V98 Internship in Criminology (1-6 semester credit hours) Provides faculty supervision for a student's internship. Internships must be related to the student's course work. Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

CRIM 4V99 Senior Honors in Criminology (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Economics

ECON 2001 Principles of Macroeconomics: Recitation (0 semester credit hours) This course is designed as a recitation or practice session for ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics core curriculum course. Credit/No Credit only. Corequisite: ECON 2301. (1-0) S

ECON 2301 (ECON 2301) Principles of Macroeconomics (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to theories of the determination of national production and income, interest rates, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include the banking system, balance of payments, economic growth and development. (3-0) S

ECON 2302 (ECON 2302) Principles of Microeconomics (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to theories of the behavior of markets. Topics include the theory of demand and supply, market structure, consumer behavior, firm behavior, international trade and the role of government policy and regulation. Note: ECON 2302 may be taken prior to ECON 2301. (3-0) S

ECON 3304 Basic Techniques for Economic Research (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the primary methods used in economic research. Topics include information technology, computer software, mathematics and statistics for economists. This course is designed to provide a foundation for all other upper level economics and finance courses. Prerequisites: (MATH 1314 and STAT 1342) or (MATH 1314 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303)). (3-0) Y

ECON 3310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 semester credit hours) The study of theories of demand, production, competition, markets, and welfare. Implications of theory for purposes of public policy prescriptions are given particular emphasis. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417) and (STAT 1342 or EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) S

ECON 3311 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 semester credit hours) A study of the determinants of national income, employment, interest rates, and the price level, including theories and evidence regarding the influence of monetary and fiscal policies on the economy. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and ECON 2302 and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417) and (STAT 1342 or EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) S

ECON 3312 Money and Banking (3 semester credit hours) The development, structure, and regulation of financial institutions and the roles of these institutions in determining the money supply and level of economic activity. Prerequisite: ECON 2301. (3-0) T

ECON 3315 Sports Economics (3 semester credit hours) Applies principles of economic analysis to look at the nature and characteristics of professional and amateur sports industries. Examines franchising and profit-maximization, monopoly and anti-trust, public financing of sports facilities, labor markets for players, team competitive balance, discrimination and other themes. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) T

ECON 3330 Economics of Health (3 semester credit hours) A study of personal and public expenditures on health care, the markets for medical personnel, the medical industry, the health insurance market, and present and proposed health care policies. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (3-0) R

ECON 3332 Economic Geography (3 semester credit hours) This course will provide students with an introduction to economic geography which is the study of the location, distribution, and spatial organization of economic activities. The course will cover the following concepts: (1) Location and spatial distribution of economic activities, (2) Spatial interaction and economic dependence (trade, transportation, and migration), and (3) Economic change in spatial context (economic growth and performance of regions). Students will be introduced to the use of geospatial software (ESRI ArcView) to analyze economic trends and patterns. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and ECON 2302 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or STAT 1342). (3-0) R

ECON 3335 Psychology and Economics (3 semester credit hours) A study of the ways economists use basic principles from psychology in order to test and augment economic theory. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) R

ECON 3336 Economics of Education (3 semester credit hours) This course looks at education through the lens of economics. Topics include ways to finance education, various controversies in the production of human capital, public policies that are designed to improve education and the consequences of poor educational performance. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) R

ECON 3337 Economics of Poverty and Inequality (3 semester credit hours) Examines the economic causes and consequences of poverty and inequality. Topics include U.S. welfare policy and transfer programs. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) R

ECON 3369 Political Economy of Terrorism (3 semester credit hours) Economic and statistical methods applied to terrorism. Topics include liberal democracy dilemma, counterterrorism, history of terrorism, international cooperation, and game theory applications. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) R

ECON 3381 Economic History (3 semester credit hours) A review of the history of Western civilization, with particular emphasis on the economic influences of money, resources, production, and trade on political and social events. This course is also recommended for students who are not economics majors. (3-0) R

ECON 4301 Game Theory (3 semester credit hours) Rational decision-making in strategic situations where the optimal decision for one player depends upon the strategies of others. Games are illustrated through the use of economic examples, such as pricing and output decisions of firms, common property usage, bargaining, international trade games, and games of market entry. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) T

ECON 4310 Managerial Economics (3 semester credit hours) The development of tools based on economic principles for managerial decisions about pricing, costing, market structure, and strategic competition. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417). (3-0) R

ECON 4320 Public Sector Economics (3 semester credit hours) A study of the economics of the public sector, including taxation, public expenditures, and fiscal policy. Examines the theoretical foundation for government intervention in the economy, and the incentive effects of government policies on work, investment, and the spending of income. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) Y

ECON 4330 Law and Economics (3 semester credit hours) Contracts, torts, and property rights, integrating economic theory concerning efficiency and equity with actual legal cases. Topics include medical malpractice, habitability laws, zoning, crime deterrence, environmental laws, and discrimination. This course is also recommended for students who are not economics majors. (3-0) R

ECON 4332 Energy and Natural Resources Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course is a study in the application of economics to renewable and nonrenewable natural resources problems and to the role of the energy sector in the world economy. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and ECON 3310. (3-0) R

ECON 4333 Environmental Economics (3 semester credit hours) A study of people and their environment, emphasizing the social and economic consequences of development and pollution. Alternative public policies for dealing with environmental impacts are explored. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and ECON 3310. (3-0) T

ECON 4334 Experimental Economics (3 semester credit hours) This is a course in the use of laboratory methods to study behavior in economics and the social sciences. Students will study state-of-the-art methodology in experimental economics, including experimental design, laboratory technique, financial incentives, and analysis of data. Students will participate in, design, and conduct experiments in bargaining, auctions, asset markets, public goods and commons situations, and risky decision-making. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) T

ECON 4336 Environmental Economic Theory and Policy (3 semester credit hours) Economic and ecology aims at understanding the workings of highly interconnected systems in which trade-offs among goals of participants and policy makers are unavoidable. This course brings them together to study the environmental implications of environmental growth and development and to utilize the tools of economic theory to analyze ecological problems and suggest practical policy solutions that are efficient as well as effective. Topics include environmental ethics, collective goods, externalities, pollution control, energy, economics and ecology, and climate change. Prerequisite: ECON 2302. (3-0) R

ECON 4340 Labor Economics and Human Resources (3 semester credit hours) Analyses of wage and employment determination, the role of unions and government in labor market outcomes; discussion of such issues as human capital, discrimination, occupational safety and health, and labor market segmentation. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) T

ECON 4342 Public Policies Toward Business (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of the economic rationale for government intervention in markets. The course considers direct intervention in the form of price, entry, and/or product quality directives, the economic welfare foundations of public utility economics, and the theory of regulation and deregulation, including indirect regulation through antitrust laws. Topics include collusion, price discrimination, vertical restraints, and other attempts to monopolize a market. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) R

ECON 4345 Industrial Organization (3 semester credit hours) Market structure, firm conduct, and social performance of industries with emphasis on firms' strategic behavior in price and nonprice competition. Topics include oligopoly pricing, strategic entry deterrence, location strategies, product differentiation, advertising, research and development, and the effect of firms' conduct on economic welfare and market structure. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) T

ECON 4346 Technology, Economy, and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the ways technology and society shape one another in an economic context. Drawing on theoretical and research contributions from several social sciences, the course devotes primary attention to the economic impacts of so-called information and communication technologies (ICT) on employment and earnings, job creation and destruction, new firm formation and failure, as well as profit and productivity. (3-0) R

ECON 4348 Business and Technology (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the role of technological innovation in macroeconomic performance and firm-level business activity. It highlights theoretical and research contributions from across several social sciences, engineering, and management. Topics include reflection on how technical advances emerge from - and have their impacts shaped within - markets and broader societal organization. The roles of domestic political institutions and public policy, as well as geo-political contexts, will be used to illustrate the broader implications of the technology-business relationship. Prerequisite: ECON 2302 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ECON 4351 Mathematical Economics (3 semester credit hours) Mathematical formulation of economic theories such as static and dynamic analysis of market behavior and macroeconomic models. Introduction to optimization techniques and linear algebra. Prerequisites: (STAT 1342 or EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or OPRE 3360) and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

ECON 4355 Econometrics (3 semester credit hours) The application of statistical methods to economic analysis; particular attention is given to regression analysis and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: (STAT 1342 or EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or OPRE 3360) and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

ECON 4360 International Trade (3 semester credit hours) Studies international relationships among national economies with a principal focus on trade relationships. Examines theories of trade, rationale for protectionism, and the foundation of exchange markets. Prerequisite: ECON 3310. (3-0) Y

ECON 4362 Development Economics (3 semester credit hours) A study of development and economic growth, with a principal focus on less developed countries. Includes theories and patterns of development, the role of human resources, capital resources, agriculture, and international markets. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and ECON 3311. (3-0) R

ECON 4370 Advanced Experimental Economics (3 semester credit hours) Students will design and implement economic experiments in order to test hypotheses about human behavior and institutional arrangements. Prerequisites: ECON 4334 and instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ECON 4381 History of Economic Ideas (3 semester credit hours) An investigation into the writings and ideas of economists past and present. Beginning with the ancient Greeks and ending with contemporary radical economic thought, the course places current economic issues into historical perspective. Works by Smith, Malthus, Mill, Marx, Veblen, Schumpeter, Galbraith, and others are covered. This course is also recommended for students who are not economics majors. (3-0) R

ECON 4382 International Finance (3 semester credit hours) Studies the international financial system, including the foreign exchange markets and the balance of payment accounts. Includes a discussion of international monetary theory. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. Prerequisite: ECON 3311. (3-0) T

ECON 4385 Business and Economic Forecasting (3 semester credit hours) Techniques, statistical and otherwise, for forecasting events relevant to business and economic activities. Prerequisite: (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419) and (STAT 1342 or EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) R

ECON 4396 Selected Topics in Economics (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

ECON 4V97 Independent Study in Economics (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: ECON 3310 and ECON 3311 and instructor and program head consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

ECON 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

ECON 4V99 Senior Honors in Economics (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Environmental Sciences

ENVR 2302 (GEOL 1305) The Global Environment (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the physical aspects of the world's geography emphasizing the interrelationships between the earth and its climate, vegetations, soils, and landforms. Provides a global perspective on the physical environment and the interactions between global systems to produce regional differences. (Same as GEOG 2302 and GEOS 2302) (3-0) T

Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

EPPS 1110 Freshman Seminar (1 semester credit hour) This course is a graduation requirement for all first time in college EPPS freshman. This course is designed to introduce incoming freshmen to the intellectual and cultural environment of the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences. Students will learn about EPPS majors, research opportunities, careers, and internships. The course covers introductory information applied to criminology, political science, public affairs/public administration, nonprofit management, economics, global economy, and sociology. This course is also open to all non-EPPS majors. Corequisite: UNIV 1010. (1-1) Y

EPPS 2301 Research Design in the Social and Policy Sciences (3 semester credit hours) Approaches adopted by the social and policy sciences to increase understanding and develop actions to improve the world. Topics include: philosophy of science, logic of inquiry, role of theory in attributing cause, articulating answerable research questions, efficient exploration of the research literature, types of research design, qualitative approaches, transforming abstract concepts into measurable indicators, producing reliable data, assessing validity of conclusions, and research ethics and politics. Students completing this course will have a good understanding of systematic inquiry and its capacity to yield useful knowledge and a solid foundation for further study of research methods. (3-0) S

EPPS 2302 Methods of Quantitative Analysis in the Social and Policy Sciences (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces basic concepts and methods of statistical analysis used in different fields of social and policy science research to better understand human relationships and the impacts of government action on them. Topics include data description, using probability to assess the reasonableness of claims about the world based on sample data, exploring cause-effect interactions through regression models, and application of software to ease visualization and calculation. Students completing this course will be good consumers of statistical information and have a solid foundation for pursuing further study of quantitative analysis. NOTE: EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 is required for all School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences majors and is a prerequisite for required research methods courses in economics (ECON 3304). Credit cannot be received for both courses, EPPS 2302 and EPPS 2303. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or equivalent. (3-0) S

EPPS 2303 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics for the Social and Policy Sciences (3 semester credit hours) Statistical procedures used to analyze relationships in the social and policy sciences. Subject matters cover: display (frequency, contingency tables); data types (continuous, categorical); measurement (central tendency, variability); probability distributions (discrete, continuous, normal); inference (hypothesis testing, sampling distributions, confidence intervals); testing differences in means, proportions, variances, frequencies, medians and ranks (z-test, t-test, power, chi-square test, ANOVA, Wilcoxon, etc.); association (correlation); explanation and prediction (regression); and software applications. Students completing this course will be knowledgeable consumers of statistical information and prepared to undertake advanced statistics courses. NOTE: EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 is required for all School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences majors and is a prerequisite for required research methods courses in economics (ECON 3304). Credit cannot be received for both courses, EPPS 2302 and EPPS 2303. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or equivalent. (3-0) S

EPPS 3305 Statistical Modeling for the Social and Policy Sciences (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces multivariate modeling of statistical relationships in which outcome or response variables depend on one or more explanatory or predictor variables. It covers linear and non-linear multiple regression for continuous outcome variables, logistic regression for binary outcome variables, and multifactor analysis of variance for quantitative outcome and two or more categorical explanatory variables. Emphasis on understanding the uses and limitations of models, fitting models to data and interpreting results, assessing and diagnosing models, and using models for statistical inference. Prerequisite: EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303 or equivalent. (3-0) R

EPPS 3405 Introduction to Social Statistics with Lab (4 semester credit hours) This course introduces students to the basic tools of statistics and shows how they are used in the analysis of social science data. A fundamental understanding of these tools is a critical foundation for social science research in many fields. The course covers descriptive statistics, inference from samples, hypothesis testing, and the basics of regression analysis. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 (preferred) or higher. (3-1) S

EPPS 4301 Public Health (3 semester credit hours) An overview of American health care policy and the political, economic, demographic, and cultural contexts within which it operates. Specific topics to be covered include the rise of scientific medicine and the evolving role of the American medical profession, health care finance and the implications of third party reimbursement systems; access to health care and the persistence of, and responses to, health disparities; the causes and consequences of health care cost trends; factors that shape the quality of health care services; the role of public health programs and of health prevention and promotion; and the nature and impact of recent health care policy reforms. (3-0) Y

Geography

GEOG 2302 (GEOL 1305) The Global Environment (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the physical aspects of the world's geography emphasizing the interrelationships between the earth and its climate, vegetations, soils, and landforms. Provides a global perspective on the physical environment and the interactions between global systems to produce regional differences. (Same as ENVR 2302 and GEOS 2302) (3-0) T

GEOG 2303 People and Place: An Introduction to World Geographic Regions (3 semester credit hours) Provides an introduction to the human geography of the world by examining how key concepts of place and space can be used to understand the character and interactions of major regions of the world including Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Middle America, the Caribbean, the Pacific World, North America, South America, and Sub-Saharan Africa. (3-0) Y

GEOG 3304 Principles of Geospatial Information Sciences (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the primary Geospatial Information Sciences (GIS) methods for manipulating, querying, analyzing, and visualizing spatial-based data. Topics include spatial data models, data acquisition and editing, cartography, and spatial analysis. This course is designed to provide a foundation for all other upper level GISC courses. (Same as GISC 3304 and GEOS 3304) (3-0) Y

GEOG 3331 Urban Growth and Structure (3 semester credit hours) Deals with the economic and spatial processes underlying urban growth and regional development, and with the structural and demographic characteristics of urban areas as well as the social and psychological dynamics of urban life. (3-0) T

GEOG 3357 Spatial Dimensions of Health and Disease (3 semester credit hours) Examines the spatial dimensions of health, disease and the public health and health care systems. Provides an introduction to spatial epidemiology and a bridge to the terminology of medical and health care professionals. (3-0) R

GEOG 3359 Human Migration and Mobility: Global Patterns (3 semester credit hours) Explores the nature, structure and geography of population flows, and their influence on evolution of human settlement patterns through the ages. Offers analysis of push and pull factors as reflections of socioeconomic conditions in various regions of the world, and investigates the impacts of globalization on migration and mobility. (3-0) Y

GEOG 3370 The Global Economy (3 semester credit hours) Considers the changing relationships of population, resources, and the economy; the transformation of classical spatial economics; and the processes producing increasing globalization. Particular attention is paid to technological change and to the dynamics of world trade and investment. This course is also recommended for students who are not economics majors. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (3-0) T

GEOG 3372 Population and Development (3 semester credit hours) Examines the relations between population, development, and the environment. Essential components of demographic analysis lay the foundation for a critical evaluation of demographic transition theory. Other topics include public health, population structure and life chances, cultural differences and women's status, aging, environmental impacts, and population policy. (3-0) T

GEOG 3377 Urban Planning and Policy (3 semester credit hours) Explores important substantive areas and concepts in the field of urban and regional planning and current urban planning and policy issues and debates. Topics include: forces that have historically guided and are currently guiding U.S. urbanization; land use, growth management, transportation and traffic congestion, economic development, housing and community development, environmental planning; legal, environmental, governmental contexts. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (Same as PA 3377) (3-0) R

GEOG 3382 Russia: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to Russian geography, economics, politics, history, culture and Russian-American relations. Explores characteristics of Russian society and its evolution. Investigates the rise of Russia to prominence, the Soviet legacy in present economic and social policies, and Russia's place in the global order. (3-0) Y

GEOG 4309 Urban Development (3 semester credit hours) Explores emergence and expansion of social, political and economic forces that drive urbanization, city growth and decline, and spatial patterns of development at the global, national and metropolitan scale. Focus is on understanding the nature of urban development challenges around the world and on developing public and private sector interventions to address them, including those that target poverty, education, employment, shelter, transportation, land use, economic development, governance and environmental sustainability. (Same as IPEC 4309) (3-0) T

GEOG 4380 Spatial Concepts and Organization (3 semester credit hours) Examines the recurring patterns of physical objects and human beings on the Earth's surface, the flows or circulations among them, and the spatial concepts and theories which have been advanced to help understand and explain these spatial arrangements. Provides a fundamental understanding of spatial processes, concepts and theories. (3-0) Y

GEOG 4396 Selected Topics in Geography (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

GEOG 4V97 Independent Study in Geography (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

GEOG 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

GEOG 4V99 Senior Honors in Geography (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Geospatial Information Sciences

GISC 2302 Geodesy and Geospatial Analysis (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the basic concepts of geodetic datums (horizontal and vertical), coordinate systems, and map projections. Applications in the Earth Sciences will be discussed to reinforce concepts. (3-0) Y

GISC 2305 Introduction to Spatial Thinking (3 semester credit hours) Explores the role that spatial thinking plays across a variety of subject areas, including the sciences, social and policy sciences, engineering, and business. Various aspects of spatial patterns, trends, and themes and methodologies for bringing spatial considerations into these areas are discussed. Geotechnologies, such as global positioning systems (GPS), remote sensing, and geographic information systems (GIS) will be employed to support spatial thinking and its applications. Emphasis will be placed on learning spatial concepts instead of specific software. The course is of value not only to future specialists in GIS, but to all students with interest in applying spatial thinking techniques to their specific fields. (Same as GEOS 2305) (3-0) Y

GISC 3304 Principles of Geospatial Information Sciences (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the primary Geospatial Information Sciences (GIS) methods for manipulating, querying, analyzing, and visualizing spatial-based data. Topics include spatial data models, data acquisition and editing, cartography, and spatial analysis. This course is designed to provide a foundation for all other upper level GISC courses. (Same as GEOG 3304 and GEOS 3304) (3-0) Y

GISC 4310 Environmental and Health Policy in East Asia (3 semester credit hours) Rapid development in East Asia has brought economic wealth to individuals in this region but has also created serious environmental and health problems such as pollution, resource depletion, pandemics, climate change, and so on. This course explores the environmental and human health challenges in East Asia as well as how governments and other actors are addressing them through various approaches to "sustainable development." East Asia is defined for this course as the region encompassing China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and some countries in Southeast Asia, but we will also focus on the role of the United States as it has been extensively involved in this region, when necessary. To help build the fundamental background of students' understanding of current environmental and health issues in East Asia, the course begins with an overview of historical, geographic, socioeconomic, political, and cultural issues in East Asia, and then examines ongoing policy actions to address various environmental and health problems in the region. Students are expected to take an active role in reviewing and discussing the material and, more importantly, in thinking critically about the interrelations of environment and human health in East Asia. (Same as IPEC 4310) (3-0) T

GISC 4317 GeoComputation (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to fundamental computational skills and their implementation in GIS software development. Topics covered include geoprocessing functions, geospatial modeling, visual programming, scripting and application development. Students are expected to design and implement a project. Prerequisite: GEOG 3304 or GEOS 3304 or GISC 3304. (3-0) Y

GISC 4325 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 semester credit hours) Topics include principles of remote sensing and sensors, image visualization and statistics, radiometric and geometric correction, enhancement, classification, change detection, and innovative image processing approaches. (Same as GEOS 4325) (3-0) Y

GISC 4326 Cartography and GeoVisualization (3 semester credit hours) Examines the theoretical concepts and practical applications of cartographic and geographic visualization. Topics covered include concepts for geographic data representation, symbolization and map design, and methods for geographic visualization and display. 3D visualization, cartographic animation, and web-based mapping may also be included. Lab sessions explore the implementation of cartographic and geographic visualization with industry standard GIS software. Prerequisite: GEOS 2305 or GISC 2305 or GEOG 3304 or GEOS 3304 or GISC 3304. (3-0) Y

GISC 4382 Applied Geographic Information Systems (3 semester credit hours) Further develops hands-on skills, such as spatial analysis, pattern analysis and statistical analysis of GIS data, with industry-standard GIS software for application in a wide variety of areas including urban, transportation, marketing and location analysis, environmental management, geologic and geophysical analysis, and the economic, political and policy sciences. Prerequisites: (GEOG 3304 or GEOS 3304 or GISC 3304) and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303) or equivalent with instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

GISC 4384 Health and Environmental GIS: A Global Perspective (3 semester credit hours) This course covers emerging issues in global health and environmental policy, with special emphasis on applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial analytic tools in identifying and responding to physical and social environmental risk factors that impact the health and well-being of peoples throughout the world. This introductory but interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues in global health and environmental policy and practices. This course helps students understand various social, economic, political and environmental determinants of health, and consider evidences that inequalities in education, income and accessibility to resources influence health status. Emphasis is placed on issues of global health inequality and environmental justice at various levels. Ample hands-on laboratory experiences will be provided on how to utilize various geospatial methods such as spatial analysis, modeling, simulation and mapping with real-world data using state-of-the-art commercial and open source software. Students will also develop skills in cost-effectiveness analysis and health outcome measurement, using a variety of contemporary global health case studies which focus on content areas such as maternal and child health, environmental health, infectious diseases (HIV/AIDS, malaria, diarrheal diseases, etc.) and global healthcare delivery. Students may need some quantitative skills to analyze global public health problems, but the level of the analytical components of the course will be determined by the background of the enrolled students. (Same as IPEC 4384) (3-0) T

GISC 4385 Advanced Applications in GIS (3 semester credit hours) This course covers advanced applications in contemporary geographic information system and sciences. The course discusses a wide range of GIS principles, concepts, functions and algorithms and how they can be applied to a specific application area such as real estate, urban planning, crime, and transportation. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisite: GEOS 2305 or GISC 2305 or GEOG 3304 or GEOS 3304 or GISC 3304. (3-0) Y

GISC 4386 Global Change and Its Challenges (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to global environmental change with a focus on the physical processes and patterns of terrestrial, atmospheric, and climatic changes, and the social causes and implications of these changes. Topics covered include impacts of human activities on land, water and atmosphere, including land-use and land-cover change, water pollution, the greenhouse effect, and climate change. Remote sensing and GIS data and models are used to illustrate examples of and track change. (3-0) Y

GISC 4V96 Special Topics in Geospatial Information Science (1-3 semester credit hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit (9 semester credit hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

GISC 4V97 Independent Study in Geospatial Information Science (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

GISC 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

GISC 4V99 Senior Honors in Geospatial Information Science (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors thesis or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Government and Politics

GOVT 2107 (GOVT 2107) Federal and Texas Constitutions (1 semester credit hour) Includes consideration of the Constitution of the United States and the constitutions of the states, with special emphasis on that of Texas. Enrollment limited to students who have already completed a minimum of 6 semester credit hours of GOVT courses but have not satisfied the statutory requirement for study of the federal and state constitutions. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306. (1-0) S

GOVT 2305 (GOVT 2305) American National Government (3 semester credit hours) Survey of American national government, politics, and constitutional development. (3-0) R

GOVT 2306 (GOVT 2306) State and Local Government (3 semester credit hours) Survey of state and local government and politics with special reference to the constitution and politics of Texas. (3-0) R

International Political Economy

IPEC 3349 World Resources and Development (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of resource mobilization, technological changes and economic development from a multidisciplinary perspective. Primary focus on the problems of the less-developed countries. Topics include technology transfer, industrialization strategy, education policy, population growth, nutrition and foreign aid. (3-0) R

IPEC 4301 Political Economy of Industrialized Countries (3 semester credit hours) How can German carmakers be among the best in the world if they are required to give two years notice before firing someone? Why did Swedish firms help to introduce a free universal health care system? Why it is rational for German companies to grant their workers veto rights over management decisions, but not for U.S. firms? Clearly, labor rights, market regulations, and industrial organization differ significantly across the United States, Germany, and Sweden. Yet, economics as a social science typically does not incorporate these differences. On the other hand, political economy analyzes how factors such as the electoral system, degree of business coordination, and governmental regulation shape business strategy. Understanding the effect of these differences is essential for managers designing investment strategies or policy makers developing policy recommendations. Using case studies, this course offers students opportunities to sharpen their analytical skills with real world applications and expand upon black-and-white theories from business and economics. (3-0) T

IPEC 4302 Political Economy of Developing Countries (3 semester credit hours) We typically assume that democracy is good for economic growth. But if this is the case, how do we explain China's economic success? Similarly, economic theory states that governments should not interfere with the market, but why did South Korea industrialize at an incredible pace by doing exactly that while Argentina failed miserably? Why are natural resources a blessing in Botswana but a curse in Nigeria? If we have learned anything from developing countries' experiences, it is that there is no universal "one-size-fits-it-all" answer. This course explores the conditions under which grand theories of development are valid. It is crucial to take these differences in local conditions into account when developing policy recommendations or investment strategies. Using case studies in every class, this course offers students opportunities to sharpen their analytical skills to make sense of a complicated world. (3-0) T

IPEC 4303 Political Economy of South and Southeast Asia (3 semester credit hours) South Asia is the Indian peninsula. Southeast Asia is the great swath of countries from Burma and Thailand through Malaysia to Indonesia and Australia. This is a region of great cultural, political, economic, religious, and historical diversity. This course surveys the region by selectively examining key countries and their mutual interactions. The major countries, which will always be included, are Pakistan, India, Thailand, Indonesia and Australia. Additional countries, which will be included according to interest and available material, include Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Burma, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, East Timor and New Zealand. (3-0) T

IPEC 4304 Political Economy of Latin America (3 semester credit hours) Addresses historical and contemporary issues in Latin American political economy. Uses case studies and cross-regional comparisons to assess competing explanations. Analyzes the current political and economic situation facing Latin America in its quest for economic growth and development. The emphasis is to understand the patterns of development and change in the region. (3-0) T

IPEC 4305 Topics in Science, Technology and Institutions (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the student to important facets of the relationship between science, technology and political-social institutions. The course begins by addressing issues relating to the philosophy of science and related epistemological concerns, i.e. "how do we know what we know?" Issues of deductive and inductive logic are explored, and different viewpoints, including Kuhnian and Popperian approaches to the philosophy of science are examined. The course also examines issues related to the relationship between science and politics. For example, does science promote democracy, and vice versa? Lastly, the course addresses important contemporary topics related to climate change, biotechnology and genetic engineering, artificial intelligence and nanotechnology, and other topics, with the aim of examining the science-technology-society nexus. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

IPEC 4307 Regional Topics in International Political Economy (3 semester credit hours) Students will explore development or political economy trends in a particular country or region. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

IPEC 4308 Political Economy of Africa (3 semester credit hours) Reviews the economics and politics of development in Africa. Focus is on political foundations of economic performance and relationships between governance, geography, institutions, external forces and economic change. Exploration of negative and positive trends, such as continuing crises, democratization, political instability, challenges of economic management, and re-colonization for export commodity production. (3-0) T

IPEC 4309 Urban Development (3 semester credit hours) Explores emergence and expansion of social, political and economic forces that drive urbanization, city growth and decline, and spatial patterns of development at the global, national and metropolitan scale. Focus is on understanding the nature of urban development challenges around the world and on developing public and private sector interventions to address them, including those that target poverty, education, employment, shelter, transportation, land use, economic development, governance and environmental sustainability. (Same as GEOG 4309) (3-0) T

IPEC 4310 Environmental and Health Policy in East Asia (3 semester credit hours) Rapid development in East Asia has brought economic wealth to individuals in this region but has also created serious environmental and health problems such as pollution, resource depletion, pandemics, climate change, and so on. This course explores the environmental and human health challenges in East Asia as well as how governments and other actors are addressing them through various approaches to "sustainable development." East Asia is defined for this course as the region encompassing China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and some countries in Southeast Asia, but we will also focus on the role of the United States as it has been extensively involved in this region, when necessary. To help build the fundamental background of students' understanding of current environmental and health issues in East Asia, the course begins with an overview of historical, geographic, socioeconomic, political, and cultural issues in East Asia, and then examines ongoing policy actions to address various environmental and health problems in the region. Students are expected to take an active role in reviewing and discussing the material and, more importantly, in thinking critically about the interrelations of environment and human health in East Asia. (Same as GISC 4310) (3-0) T

IPEC 4375 Benefit-Cost Analysis (3 semester credit hours) Theoretical and practical introduction to measuring and weighing economic benefits of projects, programs or policies against costs incurred to produce those benefits. This helps to distinguish actions that make good use of resources from actions that make poor use of them. Topics include identification and valuation of costs and benefits, converting between future and present values, dealing with uncertainty, estimating impacts, and accounting for transfers between winners and losers that result from public intervention. (3-0) T

IPEC 4376 Foreign Policy and Public Opinion (3 semester credit hours) This course considers the themes of intervention and isolation, and of pragmatism and prudence, in government making of and in public opinion about foreign policy. Topics involve the domestic and international sources and consequences of government making of foreign policy, as well as of public opinion about foreign policy, including the effects of foreign policy on public opinion and of public opinion on foreign policy, in terms of restraining or supporting government actions, in times of peace and of war. (Same as PSCI 4376) (3-0) T

IPEC 4377 Politics of International Finance (3 semester credit hours) When explaining financial crises, economic theory is often confronted with puzzles such as: A speculative attack was launched against the currency of one country, while a neighboring country with virtually identical economic conditions remained untouched. When economic explanations fall short, analyzing the role of politics in finance can provide answers. This course aims to provide such answers by analyzing the interplay between politics and finance. The first section of the course deals with the way stock markets and banks operate in different countries. The second section analyzes how politics affects exchange rates and capital mobility. The final section of the course investigates sovereign debt and lending. Within these broad topics we will ask and answer questions such as "What factors explain how stock markets respond to political events?", "How do political institutions shape the decision of firms to issue equity rather than use banks?", "Why did investors loose confidence in Thailand's currency but not Vietnam?", and "Why did Argentina decide to default on its debt while neighboring Brazil did not?" This course is particularly suited for students interested in careers in business or government. Future investors and government officials will need the skills necessary to analyze the two-way relationship of politics affecting finance and finance shaping politics. (3-0) R

IPEC 4384 Health and Environmental Policy: A Global Perspective (3 semester credit hours) This course covers emerging issues in global health and environmental policy, with special emphasis on applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial analytic tools in identifying and responding to physical and social environmental risk factors that impact the health and well-being of peoples throughout the world. This introductory but interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues in global health and environmental policy and practices. This course helps students understand various social, economic, political and environmental determinants of health, and consider evidences that inequalities in education, income and accessibility to resources influence health status. Emphasis is placed on issues of global health inequality and environmental justice at various levels. Ample hands-on laboratory experiences will be provided on how to utilize various geospatial methods such as spatial analysis, modeling, simulation and mapping with real-world data using state-of-the-art commercial and open source software. Students will also develop skills in cost-effectiveness analysis and health outcome measurement, using a variety of contemporary global health case studies which focus on content areas such as maternal and child health, environmental health, infectious diseases (HIV/AIDS, malaria, diarrheal diseases, etc.) and global healthcare delivery. Students may need some quantitative skills to analyze global public health problems, but the level of the analytical components of the course will be determined by the background of the enrolled students. (Same as GISC 4384) (3-0) T

IPEC 4396 Topics in International Political Economy (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (12 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

IPEC 4V91 Undergraduate Research in International Political Economy (1-6 semester credit hours) Subject and scope to be determined on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

IPEC 4V97 Independent Study (1-6 semester credit hours) Provides faculty supervision for student's individual study of a topic agreed upon by the student and the faculty supervisor. Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

IPEC 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

IPEC 4V99 Senior Honors in International Political Economy (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Interdisciplinary Studies - Social Sciences

ISSS 4320 Social Entrepreneurship (3 semester credit hours) This course is about providing those interested in entrepreneurial ventures with primarily a social focus with the skills and knowledge necessary to accomplish their goals. The course will be seminar style and require a practicum. Topics include entrepreneurship in the nonprofit sector, entrepreneurship in political campaigns, new public management and the role of entrepreneurship in government and public services, urban planning, and geographical information sciences as a tool all entrepreneurs can use in the creation of new opportunities. (3-0) R

ISSS 4359 Science, Technology and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the relationship between science and democracy, then moves to an analysis of the impact of information technologies, including speculation about advances in artificial intelligence and related advances including robotics, on culture and other human institutions. The impact of biotechnology, advances in medicine and other issues are also explored. The role of ethics in the development and deployment of these technologies will be an important component of the course. Also, the presence of anti-scientific mindsets and prejudices, as manifested by various groups and diverse ideological perspectives, is examined. (3-0) R

ISSS 4V86 Special Interdisciplinary Topics in the Social Sciences (1-9 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). ([1-9]-0) R

ISSS 4V97 Independent Study in Interdisciplinary Studies (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent Study under a faculty member's direction. Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

Public Affairs Management

PA 2325 Introduction to Public Service (3 semester credit hours) A broad introduction to public service that explores the history of public service in American life, the contemporary erosion of interest in public service, different options for public service, and considers how to increase public service engagement. (3-0) Y

PA 3306 Advanced Research and Writing for the Policy Sciences (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the relationship between theory and research and will require students to develop a research project that focuses on an area of social policy including, but not limited to, education, welfare, the family, health care and workplace diversity. Implications for public policy will also be considered. Prerequisites: PA 2325 and EPPS 2301 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303). (3-0) Y

PA 3310 Public Management (3 semester credit hours) Overview of management responsibilities, functions, and activities in government agencies within the framework of political values and organizational dynamics. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (Same as PSCI 3310) (3-0) S

PA 3314 Financial Management (3 semester credit hours) Financial accounting, control, and management for efficient and effective resource use within public and nonprofit organizations. (3-0) R

PA 3333 Human Resources Management (3 semester credit hours) Leadership, motivation, decision making, conflict resolution, performance, and other important challenges of personnel management in government organizations. (3-0) Y

PA 3377 Urban Planning and Policy (3 semester credit hours) Explores important substantive areas and concepts in the field of urban and regional planning and current urban planning and policy issues and debates. Topics include: forces that have historically guided and are currently guiding U.S. urbanization; land use, growth management, transportation and traffic congestion, economic development, housing and community development, environmental planning; legal, environmental, governmental contexts. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (Same as GEOG 3377) (3-0) R

PA 3378 Public Finance and Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the application of economic theories to understand the role of government. Students will learn how to use the tools of microeconomics to interpret the impacts of government policies. Topics include the role of tax, public expenditure policies, public goods, externalities, social security, and regulation. (3-0) Y

PA 3379 Diversity in the Public Sector (3 semester credit hours) This course will focus on diversity beyond just race/ethnicity and gender, and examine dimensions of sexual orientation, religion, skill level, physical ability, communication styles, and multi-generations in the workplace. Understanding diversity and learning how to manage its complexity is the key focus of this class. Students will examine the importance of multiple cultures in public organizations in work teams and discuss the challenges that come with multiculturalism. Social interactions that contribute to the understanding of difference groups in diverse settings are examined. (Same as SOC 3379) (3-0) R

PA 3380 Organizations: Theory and Behavior (3 semester credit hours) This course covers the major topics, issues, and contributions in the literature on organizations and management, with emphasis on applications to government and nonprofit organizations. Class readings draw from leading scholars in a variety of disciplinary traditions in order to shed light on the historical development of the literature. Additionally, the course material will review some of the contemporary approaches to the study of organizations. (3-0) Y

PA 3381 Field Research Methods (3 semester credit hours) Research practicum in which students learn how to conduct field research, conduct observations and interviews in the field, write field notes, and use these to analyze data. Readings focus on fieldwork roles and relations, observing and describing, writing field notes, field interviewing, ethical issues, and preliminary data analysis. Fieldwork and extensive field notes required. (Same as SOC 3381) (3-0) Y

PA 3382 Sustainable Communities (3 semester credit hours) This course will survey the following topics in public policy and environmental justice: climate change, loss of habitat and biodiversity, water security, and the effects of new technologies. We will examine policy issues in light of the challenges faced by societies to balance the needs of all stakeholders in terms of economic, social, and environmental impacts; e.g., the triple bottom line. Emphasis is placed upon gaining an understanding of the elements of environmental justice and their impacts on different sectors of society through multiple ethical paradigms. (Same as SOC 3382) (3-0) R

PA 4340 Creating High Performance Organizations (3 semester credit hours) Explores the managerial behaviors required to build high levels of performance necessary in contemporary work organizations. Explores performance management, employee engagement and high quality services, and new discoveries in the neurosciences and psychology that enhance human well- being while creating more productive work environments. (3-0) Y

PA 4345 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3 semester credit hours) This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of negotiations in the public sector. Students analyze the parties, issues and strategies in negotiations and will take part in many negotiation simulations to develop their skills in issues identification and problem resolution. The course will begin with the study of two-party negotiations and progress to multi-party, multi-issue negotiations. (3-0) R

PA 4350 Public Agencies, Management and Ethics (3 semester credit hours) Provides an in-depth knowledge of several major issues in bureaucracy including internal dynamics of public organizations, acquisitions and allocation of public funds, the roles of ethics and accountability, as well as the roles of bureaucracy in relation to public policy, clients, the citizenry, and society. (3-0) Y

PA 4351 Urban Management (3 semester credit hours) Examination of ways in which the fiscal and administrative policies of local government shape the structure of opportunities and incentives in urban areas. (3-0) R

PA 4352 Emerging Communication Strategies in Public Service Organizations (3 semester credit hours) This course reviews current and emerging communication tools and technologies employed by nonprofit and public sector managers. The course is both theoretical and practical, offering a review of the public and nonprofit sectors, while building on effective social media strategies employed in nonprofit and public-sector program implementation, donor relations, stakeholder communication, issue-advocacy, and information dissemination. Regulatory, ethical, and privacy constraints are also explored as students develop an overall appreciation of the potential costs and benefits of social media as management and marketing tools. This course may be offered in a hybrid environment with on-site and online learning. (3-0) R

PA 4355 Management of Nonprofit Organizations (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the basic concepts of the trillion dollar nonprofit sector (also known as the Third Sector) that includes education, research, health care, art, religion, social services, advocacy, legal services, international assistance, foundations and mutual benefit organizations. This comprehensive course provides a thorough introduction and understanding to the sector with a focus on the history of nonprofit organizations in America, qualifications for charitable groups, and international comparisons. (3-0) Y

PA 4370 Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Explores a full range of leadership theories and modern views of requisites for success in positions of leadership. Students will take from this course knowledge of leadership theories and practical knowledge for applying leadership principles in any organizational setting. (3-0) R

PA 4386 Social Policy in Modern Societies (3 semester credit hours) Examines the controversies and research concerning the development of welfare states and public social provision. Particular emphasis is placed on the U.S. public social spending system, in historical and comparative perspective. Explanations of developments in social policies and an assessment of their applicability to the American welfare state and those of other societies are considered. (Same as SOC 4386) (3-0) R

PA 4387 Project Management (3 semester credit hours) A practical examination of how projects are managed from start to finish. The emphasis is on planning and control to avoid common pitfall and manage risk. Planning includes defining objectives, identifying activities, establishing precedence relationships, making time estimates, determining project completion times, and determining resource requirements. (3-0) R

PA 4396 Topics in Public Administration (3 semester credit hours) Subject matters of current interest. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

PA 4V97 Independent Study in Public Administration (1-9 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (9 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-9]-0) S

PA 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

PA 4V99 Senior Honors in Public Administration (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

Public Policy

Political Science

PSCI 3301 Political Theory (3 semester credit hours) An examination of perennial issues in political thought through a study of the work and research methods of selected theorists in the history of political thought. (3-0) Y

PSCI 3303 Civil Liberties (3 semester credit hours) An examination of the development of constitutional law in the area of civil liberties. (3-0) T

PSCI 3306 Political Economy (3 semester credit hours) Investigates various conceptual perspectives for understanding the relationship between economic processes and political institutions. Focuses particular attention on the normative and policy debates separating conservative, liberal, and radical schools of thought. (3-0) R

PSCI 3310 Public Management (3 semester credit hours) Overview of management responsibilities, functions, and activities in government agencies within the framework of political values and organizational dynamics. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (Same as PA 3310) (3-0) S

PSCI 3322 Constitutional Law (3 semester credit hours) Students will examine the methods used in legal research, the evolution of the Constitution of the United States, and the role of the Supreme Court of the United States in the development of the American constitutional system. (3-0) Y

PSCI 3323 American Federalism (3 semester credit hours) An examination of how local, state, and national governments share power in such important areas as education, environmental regulation, public finance, welfare, housing and community development, and criminal justice. There will also be discussions of recent innovations, such as judicial supervision and deregulation. (3-0) R

PSCI 3325 American Public Policy (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the making of public policy in the U.S. political system. Students will examine the various public policy models and case studies related to specific policy areas. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

PSCI 3326 Politics and Business (3 semester credit hours) An investigation of the role played by business in American politics. Particular attention will be focused on the regulatory process and the changing relationship between business and government in it. (3-0) T

PSCI 3327 American Foreign Policy (3 semester credit hours) Examines the way in which policy-making process structures the premises, concepts, and objectives of U.S. policy and the U.S. role in international politics. (3-0) R

PSCI 3328 International Relations (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the power relationships among national actors and organizations. Topics may include origins of the state system, international security, globalization, north-south relations, ecological security, and the implications of world demographic patterns. (3-0) R

PSCI 3333 Political Behavior (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the questions of why some people vote but others do not, how individuals make political choices, and how people participate in other ways. It examines the behavioral approach to the study of government and politics, the major theories of political behavior, and the effects of long-term changes, socialization processes, media use and political attitudes and institutions. (3-0) Y

PSCI 3350 Comparative Politics (3 semester credit hours) An analysis of political life in different cultural and national settings. Considers different theoretical approaches to comparative politics, and differences and similarities in types of political culture, political participation, political institutions, and citizen well-being and government effectiveness. (3-0) R

PSCI 3351 Comparative Courts and Law (3 semester credit hours) Examines the roles of constitutions and law across a wide range of countries. Relatedly considers theoretical approaches and research methodologies used to advance understanding of the courts. (3-0) R

PSCI 3353 Law and Gender (3 semester credit hours) This course examines how U.S. laws and legal institutions reflect and reproduce cultural notions of gender and sexuality. Focuses on how legal equality and sex discrimination have been defined and challenged in the United States. Topics include reproductive and sexuality issues, family issues, pornography and sexual speech, workplace regulations, and, generally, how gender and sexuality interact in legal decision making. We will also examine several of these issues from an international human rights or comparative perspective. (3-0) R

PSCI 3362 The American Political Institutions (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the constitutional foundations and historical development of the Congress, the presidency, the executive, and the courts. Attention will be paid to both the interactions of these institutions, research methodologies employed in examining these institutions, and the internal workings of each. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

PSCI 3364 Campaigns and Elections (3 semester credit hours) An examination of the electoral process and the changing role that political parties have played in the development of American political institutions and public policy. (3-0) T

PSCI 4305 Political Research (3 semester credit hours) Introduces students to how to develop and answer interesting questions about citizenship, governance, and politics. Covers basic research skills and their application to real world political questions and problems. Course is recommended for students pursuing independent study or theses in the political and social sciences, or those considering law and professional programs. Prerequisites: EPPS 2301 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303). (3-0) Y

PSCI 4307 Predicting Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course covers how social scientists understand and predict political events. We will examine how to predict and explain events like riots, civil wars, intra- and inter-state conflict, terrorism, and elections. There is a growing need in the policy, human rights, and foreign policy communities for these types of forecasts for early warning systems, humanitarian aid allocation, human rights monitoring, foreign policy decision-making, and conflict mediation. The course focuses on understanding, applying, evaluating, and validating commonly used prediction methods of political events. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. Prerequisites: EPPS 2301 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303). (3-0) T

PSCI 4312 Politics of East Asia (3 semester credit hours) This course examines and compares the politics of East Asian nations in their political institutions, actors and issues. Students will study extensively the history, political geography, political economy, development and democratization of the countries in the region. (3-0) R

PSCI 4313 Politics of China (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on China's political history, the three political systems of modern China and how it is connected with the world, in particular the United States. Students will study China's political and economic development, its role in the global economy and the potential for a new world order. The course addresses special issues, especially the democratization of Greater China including Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao and China's own democratic experiments in local village elections. (3-0) R

PSCI 4314 Political Economy of East Asia (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the political economy of East Asia with primary focus on China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong. Students will study the region's development models, institutions and international organizations and analyze the rapid growth of its economy and political influence. (3-0) R

PSCI 4315 Civil Conflict in Africa (3 semester credit hours) While Africa is a diverse, growing, and geopolitically significant continent, it has also been marred by numerous civil conflicts since the end of the colonial era. This course covers theories and empirical studies of civil wars with a focus on contemporary African conflicts. Students will gain an understanding of the causes of civil conflicts, the domestic and international consequences of conflict, and how wars are resolved. The cases covered will include the struggle to end Apartheid in South Africa, the Rwandan Genocide, Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the rise of Islamic extremism in Africa. (3-0) R

PSCI 4321 Media and Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course will give students a background in the development of the press as a political institution and the logistics of news-making and coverage. We will examine the theoretical and actual roles played by the press in public affairs to develop understanding of current and persistent problems of press performance, such as bias, independence, manipulation by government and special interests, and the quest for profits at the expense of public service. (3-0) R

PSCI 4326 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 semester credit hours) Studies the development and organization of political parties and interest groups, and their activities in campaigns and policy making and implementation, in the United States. Political and legal issues in the regulation of nominating processes, campaign finance, lobbying, redistricting, and related areas are addressed. (3-0) R

PSCI 4329 Global Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course will introduce students to the study of global politics. It will explore the teachings from comparative politics and international relations in examining changing global relationships and power structures, and the research methodologies used in this analysis. (3-0) Y

PSCI 4330 The Bible and Politics (3 semester credit hours) An investigation of the Bible as a political text. Includes discussion of the political context and themes of the Bible and analysis of political theories based upon biblical perspectives. (3-0) R

PSCI 4331 Mexican Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the changing face of the Mexican political economy. Topics will include the evolution and decline of the PRI, the revolt in Chiapas, NAFTA, Mexico's role in Latin America, and the changing nature of its relations with the U.S. (3-0) T

PSCI 4332 Latin American Politics (3 semester credit hours) After a brief review of the region's history from conquest and independence up to the twentieth century, the course will include discussions of current issues confronting the region. These issues may include U.S./Latin American relations including NAFTA, demographic changes, religion, guerilla groups, revolution, and the transition from authoritarianism to democracy. (3-0) T

PSCI 4341 Politics of the Judicial Process (3 semester credit hours) The study of judicial decision making, the political impact of court decisions, and the role of lawyers and judges at the local, regional, and national levels. (3-0) T

PSCI 4343 Congress and Public Policy (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the history and development of both the place of Congress in the Constitutional order and the internal structures and behaviors of the legislative process. Topics include congressional-presidential relations, elections, representation, committees, parties and leadership, collective action and coalition building, and Congress' capacity to deliberate and make public policy "in the public interest." (3-0) T

PSCI 4344 Race and Redistricting (3 semester credit hours) Examines the politics and process of redrawing congressional and state legislative district lines, notably how this process is influenced by politics as well as by important principles and laws. Reviews the history of redistricting in the U.S. House of Representatives and considers recent redistricting and the role of race in this process. (3-0) R

PSCI 4347 The War on Drugs (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the war on drugs within the context of democratic stability. Alternative state responses to the drug trade will be covered, with attention to the consequences of those policies on democratic stability. Substantively, we will deal with these questions within the context of individual democracies in Latin America and in other regions. (3-0) T

PSCI 4348 Terrorism (3 semester credit hours) This course, focusing on cases of domestic terrorism, examines terrorism within the context of democratic stability. Alternative state responses to these crises will also be covered, with attention to the consequences of those policies on democratic stability. Substantively, we will deal with these questions within the context of individual democracies in Latin America and in other regions of the world. (3-0) T

PSCI 4349 The Politics of the Bureaucratic Process (3 semester credit hours) This course analyzes the role of administrative agencies in democratic policy making. Discusses the internal, procedural determinants of policy decision making as well as the interactions between administrative agencies and other branches of government. Topics may include the development of the contemporary administrative state, administrative rule making, and control of administrative processes by Congress, the president, and the judiciary. (3-0) R

PSCI 4352 Modern Individualism (3 semester credit hours) An investigation of the development and criticism of the modern concept of the individual in political philosophy. Among the issues to be considered are the relationship between the mind and the body in the individual, the nature of reason, passions, and instincts, the origins of morality and justice, the nature of political obligation, and the relationship between the individual and society. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

PSCI 4354 Contemporary Political Thought (3 semester credit hours) Investigates the moral and political controversies shaping contemporary political thought. Considers such issues as legitimacy, justice, distribution, and representation. (3-0) R

PSCI 4356 International Political Economy (3 semester credit hours) Focuses on the interaction of global politics and economics, including international trade, the underpinnings of international currency exchange, multinational corporations, globalization, and other topics. Prerequisite: PSCI 3328 or PSCI 4329 or undergraduate coursework in international economics. (3-0) R

PSCI 4357 Human Rights and the Rule of the Law (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the development of norms involving international human rights and law as well as major and competing theories that sometimes weigh against the development of universal human rights. Also examines the effectiveness of the courts and law, including international courts and truth commissions, in the area of human rights. (3-0) R

PSCI 4359 Globalization and International Conflict (3 semester credit hours) An examination of how recent trends in globalization affect the use of force in international relations, with particular emphasis on whether globalization makes war less likely. The course examines how the calculus of war is affected by economic interdependence, social and cultural integration, environmental pressures, demographic shifts, non-state actors, democratization, and attempts at global governance. Concludes with case studies of recent conflicts. (3-0) T

PSCI 4360 The Political Economy of Multinational Corporations (3 semester credit hours) In addition to the historical rise of international firms, the course covers the economic theory of the firm, multinational corporations (MNCs) as political actors, the dynamics of foreign direct investment, and the relationship of MNCs to developing countries. The aim of the course is to understand the causes and effects of the behavior of transnational corporations, particularly in regard to economic policy. This course will retain core notation for a transition period - see http://go.utdallas.edu/core-curriculum-transition. Please consult advisors for more detailed information. (3-0) T

PSCI 4364 Civil Rights Law and Society (3 semester credit hours) Examines the development of civil rights law, and how social ideologies are reflected and reproduced in race and sex discrimination law. Explores how power is exercised through law, and how legal change is pursued as a strategy for social reform. Topics include antislavery and the judicial process, the Reconstruction Amendments, the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. society, school segregation cases, and hate speech. (3-0) Y

PSCI 4365 Law and Medicine (3 semester credit hours) Examines the relationship between law and medical ethics. Emphasis is placed on court cases involving reproductive privacy, wrongful life, informed consent, the right to treatment, and the right to refuse treatment. (3-0) T

PSCI 4370 Policy Making Process (3 semester credit hours) A multidisciplinary exploration of the history, ideas, and institutions that set the stage for politics. This course is part of the Archer Program and is restricted to Archer Fellows. Director of Archer Program consent required. (3-0) R

PSCI 4372 Advocacy in Applied Settings (3 semester credit hours) This is a course on communication and advocacy. Students examine how people make cases for their needs in organizations, especially governmental and political ones. This course is part of the Archer Program and is restricted to Archer Fellows. Director of Archer Program consent required. (3-0) R

PSCI 4373 Beyond Congress and White House (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the sources and use of power in Washington. It focuses attention upon such issues as the constitutional and technological limits to power, power and the media, and the struggle for control over national memory and language. This course is part of the Archer Program and is restricted to Archer Fellows. Director of Archer Program consent required. (3-0) R

PSCI 4374 Policy Making in Austin (3 semester credit hours) A multidisciplinary exploration of the history, ideas, and institutions that set the stage for Texas politics and policymaking in the state legislature. This course is part of the Texas Legislative Internship Program and is restricted to Texas Legislative Internship Program Fellows. Director of Texas Legislative Internship Program consent required. (3-0) T

PSCI 4375 Advocacy in the State Legislature (3 semester credit hours) This is a course on communication, advocacy, and leadership. Students will develop communication and leadership skills to assist them in their internships. This course is part of the Texas Legislative Internship Program and is restricted to Texas Legislative Internship Program Fellows. Director of Texas Legislative Internship Program consent required. (3-0) T

PSCI 4376 Foreign Policy and Public Opinion (3 semester credit hours) This course considers the themes of intervention and isolation, and of pragmatism and prudence, in government making of and in public opinion about foreign policy. Topics involve the domestic and international sources and consequences of government making of foreign policy, as well as of public opinion about foreign policy, including the effects of foreign policy on public opinion and of public opinion on foreign policy, in terms of restraining or supporting government actions, in times of peace and of war. (Same as IPEC 4376) (3-0) T

PSCI 4377 Women and Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course describes, explains, and evaluates the meanings of politics and the private-public distinction involving politics; the participation of women in politics as voters and candidates in elections and as leaders in legislative, executive and other offices; and the consequences of women's participation for gender equity, political representation, and public policy. (3-0) T

PSCI 4378 Migration, Refugee and Asylum Policy and Law (3 semester credit hours) This course will introduce students to international and U.S. migration, asylum and refugee policy and law. The course will explore the broad issue of international migration and its effects. It will also examine the development and expansion of the international rights and protections in regard to forced migration, asylum and refugee issues. The course will explore U.S. policy and law on these issues in comparison with other receiving states. Students will be introduced to a growing body of relevant empirical research. (3-0) T

PSCI 4382 Education Policy and the Politics of Education (3 semester credit hours) Access to education and education attainment have huge impacts on the lives of individuals and aggregate social outcomes. Education in turn is affected by public policies at all levels of government which often are the subject of fierce political debate. We will examine the education system in the United States at the primary, secondary and post-secondary levels, the public policies shaping that system, and the politics underlying various policy debates. Readings and class discussions will include general overviews as well as vigorous arguments by proponents of different views. (3-0) R

PSCI 4396 Selected Topics in Government and Politics (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

PSCI 4398 Texas Legislative Internship (3 semester credit hours) This course is part of the Texas Legislative Internship Program and is restricted to Texas Legislative Internship Program Fellows. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Director of Texas Legislative Internship Program consent required. (3-0) T

PSCI 4V66 Mock Trial (1-6 semester credit hours) Examines a hypothetical case. Students will learn the Rules of Evidence and will simulate an actual trial with attorneys and witnesses. Students compete with Mock Trial teams from other universities at regional and national tournaments. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

PSCI 4V67 Moot Court (1-6 semester credit hours) Course examines a hypothetical case which contains two constitutional issues. Based on approximately 20 actual precedents, students are expected to prepare arguments supporting both the petitioner and respondents on each constitutional issue. Students compete in tournaments against advocates from other universities. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

PSCI 4V76 Archer Center Washington Internship (3-6 semester credit hours) This course is part of the Archer Program and is restricted to Archer Fellows. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Director of Archer Program consent required. ([3-6]-0) R

PSCI 4V97 Independent Study in Government and Politics (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

PSCI 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

PSCI 4V99 Senior Honors in Government and Politics (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Sociology

SOC 1301 (SOCI 1301) Introduction to Sociology (3 semester credit hours) An overview of the sociological perspective and its application to social research and social policy. (3-0) Y

SOC 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 semester credit hours) An introduction to the way gender shapes individuals, social institutions and culture. Examines gender, class, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and nationality as interactive systems. Topics include biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the cultural construction of gender; the psychology of sex roles; the ways gender shapes families, workplaces and other social institutions. (Same as GST 2300) (3-0) Y

SOC 2303 Culture, Media and Society (3 semester credit hours) Examines how various forms of modern media represent the values and lifestyles of American popular culture, and how we experience the media in our everyday lives. The course will address social issues and cultural changes related to the use of mass media, as well as social media. (3-0) Y

SOC 2305 Individual and Society (3 semester credit hours) The study of the relationship among the individual, social structure, and culture. Explores self-concept and personality, the process of socialization, role-taking and social interaction, norms, values, group membership, and group processes. (3-0) R

SOC 2320 Contemporary Social Issues (3 semester credit hours) An overview of how sociological concepts and approaches can be applied to the study of the causes and consequences of various social issues in contemporary society. Topics may include poverty, crime, violence, social isolation, urban decay, changes in the family, consumerism, and health disparities. (3-0) R

SOC 3303 Classical Social Theory (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the classic theorists in sociology, primarily works by Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. This course examines how these early theorists defined and described society within their own social contexts, as well as how we derive meaning from their writings to understand and explain issues of twenty-first century societies. Prerequisite: SOC 1301. (3-0) Y

SOC 3305 Applied Data Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an introduction to data analysis techniques using standard social science statistical software packages. Topics include application, limitations, and interpretations of research results. Prerequisite: EPPS 2301 and (EPPS 2302 or EPPS 2303). (3-0) Y

SOC 3321 Deviance (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of historical and contemporary perspectives which propose the causes, consequences, and cures for deviance. Description of theories, research, and public policy associated with efforts to control deviant behavior and deviant groups, and to establish normalcy. (3-0) R

SOC 3325 Race and Ethnicity (3 semester credit hours) Examines how race/ethnicity plays a role in social stratification in U.S. society, the economy, government, education, and other social institutions, and how public policies address social inequalities associated with such stratification. (3-0) R

SOC 3331 Education and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on education as a social institution and an agent of socialization. The formal organization of education, education and the family, education and social stratification, and education as a vehicle for examining and solving social problems are explored. Also considered is the relationship between funding sources and educational objectives and outcomes. (3-0) R

SOC 3333 Religion in Society (3 semester credit hours) This course examines how world religions in U.S. society help shape the views and behaviors of the public as they participate in education, the economy, government, healthcare, and other social institutions. The course also examines social challenges presented by the diversity of religion. (3-0) R

SOC 3336 Culture Regions (3 semester credit hours) Survey of a major region of the world as defined by a set of common cultural traditions and institutions such as Latin America, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, or South Asia. Each time the course is offered, it will review the key cultural, social, economic, and political features of the region being addressed. The specific region to be studied will be announced in advance, and the course may be repeated for credit when a different culture region is treated. (3-0) Y

SOC 3342 The Life Cycle (3 semester credit hours) An examination of the institutions that shape the course of people's lives from birth to death. Topics include primary socialization, family, schools, peer groups, occupations, retirement, and death. (3-0) R

SOC 3343 Sociology of the Family (3 semester credit hours) Trends in family life are examined with special attention to how these relate to changes in men's and women's roles. Topics include sex-role socialization, division of household labor, sexuality, emotional aspects of marriage, marital power and decision making, and divorce. (3-0) R

SOC 3344 Film and Society (3 semester credit hours) Utilizes full-length commercial films and documentaries to illuminate and demonstrate sociological concepts, phenomena and important contemporary social issues. The course also assesses the impact of films on American culture and society. (3-0) R

SOC 3346 Sociology of Sport (3 semester credit hours) Analyzes sport and its place in the culture of contemporary societies. Focuses on how sport and sport experiences are related to social development, social relations and major spheres of social life such as the economy, education and religion. (3-0) R

SOC 3352 Sex, Gender and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender. (3-0) R

SOC 3363 Immigrants and Immigration in U.S. Society (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the assimilation of immigrants and the second generation into U.S. society, specifically the economy, education, the legal system, and other social institutions. (3-0) R

SOC 3379 Diversity in the Public Sector (3 semester credit hours) This course will focus on diversity beyond just race/ethnicity and gender, and examine dimensions of sexual orientation, religion, skill level, physical ability, communication styles, and multi-generations in the workplace. Understanding diversity and learning how to manage its complexity is the key focus of this class. Students will examine the importance of multiple cultures in public organizations in work teams and discuss the challenges that come with multiculturalism. Social interactions that contribute to the understanding of difference groups in diverse settings are examined. (Same as PA 3379) (3-0) R

SOC 3381 Field Research Methods (3 semester credit hours) Research practicum in which students learn how to conduct field research, conduct observations and interviews in the field, write field notes, and use these to analyze data. Readings focus on fieldwork roles and relations, observing and describing, writing field notes, field interviewing, ethical issues, and preliminary data analysis. Fieldwork and extensive field notes required. (Same as PA 3381) (3-0) Y

SOC 3382 Sustainable Communities (3 semester credit hours) This course will survey the following topics in public policy and environmental justice: climate change, loss of habitat and biodiversity, water security, and the effects of new technologies. We will examine policy issues in light of the challenges faced by societies to balance the needs of all stakeholders in terms of economic, social, and environmental impacts; e.g., the triple bottom line. Emphasis is placed upon gaining an understanding of the elements of environmental justice and their impacts on different sectors of society through multiple ethical paradigms. (Same as PA 3382) (3-0) R

SOC 4302 Class, Status, and Power (3 semester credit hours) Explores the nature of systems of differentiation and ranking in societies and their consequences; examination of how prestige, occupational skills, education, and economic assets are used to create class distinctions in the United States; considers the impact of social class on life chances; concepts and processes of social mobility; and the influence of power inconsistencies on income, wealth, and status. Prerequisite: SOC 1301 or SOC 3303. (3-0) Y

SOC 4306 Advanced Sociological Research (3 semester credit hours) Advanced topics in research methods and data analysis are examined with an emphasis on project based learning. Smaller exercises will culminate into a complete research paper that incorporates theory, review of literature, data analysis and research findings. Projects will focus on a range of topics including, but not limited to, education, race and ethnic relations, culture, the family, health care, and workplace diversity. Prerequisites: SOC 3303 and SOC 3305. (3-0) Y

SOC 4357 Drugs, Alcohol and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the societal influences that lead to illicit drug and alcohol use and misuse, as well as the social consequences of those actions. The focus is on the social construction of addiction rather than on individual pathological behaviors. The relationship between individual and group behavior, and social structure is also explored. (3-0) R

SOC 4369 Public Health and Society (3 semester credit hours) An overview of public and population health, with an emphasis on the relationship between social forces and health. Topics to be covered include the history of public health institutions and occupations; the determinants and social components of infectious and noninfectious diseases, including major public health epidemics and the response to them; public health rates, risk factors, indicators, and vital statistics; public health law, policy, and ethics; and the effects of social forces on health, including social inequality, culture and lifestyle, and environmental and occupational influences on health. Particular emphasis will be devoted to health disparities in the U. S. and globally. (3-0) R

SOC 4371 Mental Health and Illness (3 semester credit hours) Explores the diverse, disturbing, disruptive, and disabling phenomena of mental disorders. Topics to be covered include the classification of mental disorders, the etiology and epidemiology of mental illnesses, and the history of societal responses to mentally ill, including public policies. (3-0) R

SOC 4372 Health and Illness (3 semester credit hours) An examination of the social conditions and correlates of diseases, the social behavior of the sick, health institutions and professions, and the formulation and implementation of health policies and programs. (3-0) R

SOC 4375 Gender and Work (3 semester credit hours) A sociological analysis of historical trends and current patterns of gender inequality in paid and domestic work; examination of theories and research related to the role of gender in shaping labor market opportunities, experiences, and rewards; identification of various forms of workplace discrimination and potential remedies. (3-0) R

SOC 4378 Jobs and Work in Society (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the structure of work and workplaces, with an emphasis on the division of labor, technology and work, labor force trends, job satisfaction, worker productivity and performance, occupational safety, and career patterns. (3-0) R

SOC 4380 Women, Work and Family (3 semester credit hours) An examination of the relationship between women's work for pay in the marketplace and their unpaid work in homes across time and in different cultures. Topics include historical separation of work from home under capitalism; division of household labor between men and women; public policy initiatives (socialized/commercial housework and daycare, family leave, telecommuting, part-time and flex-time work) designed to make juggling work and family easier; the ways class, race, and ethnicity constrain and enable women's choices. (Same as GST 4380) (3-0) R

SOC 4384 Social Epidemiology (3 semester credit hours) A non-technical overview of epidemiology (disease investigation) and its role in public health theory and practice, with emphasis on the social dimensions of health, illness, and injury. (3-0) Y

SOC 4385 Health and Illness in Global and Cross-national Perspective (3 semester credit hours) A review of frameworks for understanding global health issues and the improvement of health at a population level. Topics include measurement of (and strategies for reducing) the burden of morbidity and mortality; the relationships among culture, political economy, and health; comparative health care systems and health policies; the relationship between economic development and health; and the role of global governmental and nongovernmental institutions in promoting health. Course concepts will be examined in the context of case studies of global epidemics and the response to them. (3-0) R

SOC 4386 Social Policy in Modern Societies (3 semester credit hours) Examines the controversies and research concerning the development of welfare states and public social provision. Particular emphasis is placed on the U.S. public social spending system, in historical and comparative perspective. Explanations of developments in social policies and an assessment of their applicability to the American welfare state and those of other societies are considered. (Same as PA 4386) (3-0) R

SOC 4387 Religion in International Development (3 semester credit hours) This course examines how world religions play a role in social, economic, and political development, and how they contribute to policies relevant to international development. (3-0) R

SOC 4388 Religions in Global Societies (3 semester credit hours) Examines how religions in global societies, where cultural and institutional pluralism are prominent, reflect and help shape globalization processes related to the economy, government, communication, and other areas. (3-0) R

SOC 4390 Health Behavior (3 semester credit hours) An overview of human behavior and how it affects health on the macro level. This course will introduce human behavior theories and their application in health promotion program planning. (3-0) R

SOC 4391 Community Health Practice (3 semester credit hours) A tactile learning experience, this course will introduce current public health best practice methods and strategies and allow students the opportunity to apply these skills in real world settings. (3-0) R

SOC 4396 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

SOC 4V97 Independent Study in Sociology (1-6 semester credit hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

SOC 4V98 Internship (1-6 semester credit hours) Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

SOC 4V99 Senior Honors in Sociology (1-6 semester credit hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Social Sciences

SOCS 2V95 Individual Instruction in the Social Sciences (1-6 semester credit hours) Individual study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

SOCS 3111 Careers in the Social Sciences (1 semester credit hour) This one-credit course is designed to provide social sciences majors and those interested in the social sciences with information and skills that will help them select and pursue a career in their major or a related field. (1-0) Y

SOCS 3V96 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences (1-3 semester credit hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

SOCS 4320 Social Entrepreneurship (3 semester credit hours) This course is about providing those interested in entrepreneurial ventures with primarily a social focus with the skills and knowledge necessary to accomplish their goals. The course will be seminar style and require a practicum. Topics include entrepreneurship in the nonprofit sector, entrepreneurship in political campaigns, new public management and the role of entrepreneurship in government and public services, urban planning, and geographical information sciences as a tool all entrepreneurs can use in the creation of new opportunities. (3-0) R

SOCS 4V98 Pre-Law Internship (3-6 semester credit hours) An internship with law firms or judges that will expose students to legal issues and to the practice of law. An excellent exposure to the legal profession. Credit/No Credit only. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([3-6]-0) S

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