UT Dallas 2013 Undergraduate Catalog

Accounting

ACCT 2301 (ACCT 2301) Introductory Financial Accounting (3 semester hours) An introduction to financial reporting designed to create an awareness of the accounting concepts and principles for preparing the three basic financial statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. The course is designed to benefit all students who will be future users of accounting information. Students must earn a grade of C or better to progress to ACCT 2302. (3-0) S

ACCT 2302 (ACCT 2302) Introductory Management Accounting (3 semester hours) An introduction to the determination, development, and uses of internal accounting information needed by management to satisfy customers while continuously controlling and containing costs. The course is designed to benefit all students who will be future users of accounting information. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 with a grade of C or better. (3-0) S

ACCT 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Accounting in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

ACCT 3320 Financial Information Management (3 semester hours) This course is a study of the corporate financial reporting process and the use of financial statements by investors and analysts. Students use financial reports prepared by publicly-traded companies to study how financial statements and other information is prepared, communicated and used by managers, investors and other decision-makers. May not be used to satisfy degree requirements for majors in accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301. (3-0) S

ACCT 3322 Integrated Accounting Information Systems (3 semester hours) Employs SAP software or similar enterprise systems software to illustrate the fundamental concepts of integrated information systems. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419), and (MATH 2333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305 or OPRE 3333). (3-0) Y

ACCT 3331 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (3 semester hours) A study of external financial reporting, including measuring and reporting of cash, receivables, inventories, investments, property, plant and equipment, and intangibles. Current generally accepted accounting principles for financial reporting are analyzed. Prerequisites: (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419), and (ACCT 2301 with a minimum grade of C), and (ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C). (3-0) S

ACCT 3332 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (3 semester hours) This course is a continuation of topics in external financial reporting including issues related to the measurement and reporting of current liabilities and contingencies, bonds, leases, deferred taxes, pensions, stock-based compensation plans, stockholders equity, earnings per share, accounting changes, and cash flows. Current generally accepted accounting principles for financial reporting are analyzed. Prerequisite: ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C. (3-0) S

ACCT 3341 Cost Management Systems (3 semester hours) A study of management's internal accounting information needs as they pertain to cost control and containment. Emphasis is on the processes of business planning, controlling, and decision making. Topics include cost behavior, cost allocation, budgeting, and performance measurement. Prerequisites: (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419), (and ACCT 2301 with a minimum grade of C), and (ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C). (3-0) Y

ACCT 3350 Fundamentals of Taxation (3 semester hours) Introduction to the role of taxes in today's society and their impact on individuals and business entities; emphasis on federal income taxation. Prerequisites: BLAW 2301 and (ACCT 2301 with a minimum grade of C), and (ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C). (3-0) S

ACCT 4199 Senior Honors in Accounting (1 semester hour) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. Prerequisite: ACCT 4299. (1-0) S

ACCT 4299 Thesis Research Methods and Writing Seminar (2 semester hours) This course will prepare Honors Students to write their Honors Thesis. Various research methods ranging from survey to archival will be discussed. Students will choose a method, pick a research question, and produce an outline and introduction to their thesis topic. Junior standing and instructor consent required. (2-0) S

ACCT 4300 Database Fundamentals (3 semester hours) Introduces the basic concepts for the design and development of relational databases and database management. Topics include entity-relationship data model, logical database design, data administration, Structured Query Language, and database management issues, such as concurrency control, data security, and integrity. A database management system software package is used to implement working database systems. Prerequisites: MIS 3300 and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417). (Same as MIS 4300) (3-0) Y

ACCT 4334 Auditing (3 semester hours) Basic concepts, philosophy, standards, procedures, and practices of auditing are presented. Topics include generally accepted auditing standards, the role of the independent auditor in society, professional conduct and ethics, auditor's reporting responsibilities, risk assessment, internal control, fraud, and evidential matter. Prerequisite: ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C. (3-0) Y

ACCT 4336 Financial Statement Analysis (3 semester hours) Financial statements are analyzed from the user's perspective. Broad concepts are illustrated with applications to different companies. Topics include comparative analysis, earnings management and ethics in financial reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C. (3-0) Y

ACCT 4337 Business Valuation (3 semester hours) Models used to value businesses and stocks are studied and applied. Topics include income measurement and profitability assessment, analysis of discounted cash flows and accounting-based valuation models. Prerequisite: ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C. (3-0) Y

ACCT 4342 Analysis and Design of Accounting Systems (3 semester hours) Students are introduced to accounting system analysis and design tools and methods. The course emphasizes business processes, accounting transaction flows, internal control and accounting information systems as part of enterprise systems. Prerequisites: (ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C) and (Prerequisite or corequisite: ACCT 3332). (Same as MIS 4342) (3-0) S

ACCT 4365 Real Estate Accounting, Taxation and Legal Concepts (3 semester hours) This course provides a review of accounting, tax and legal issues affecting the real estate industry. Material includes special rules used by owners and developers of real estate. May not be used to satisfy degree requirements for majors in accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3320 or ACCT 3331. (Same as REAL 4365) (3-0) R

ACCT 4380 Internship in Accounting (3 semester hours) This course provides students with an opportunity to expand and apply their skills in accounting in a professional setting. The accounting student will be required to apply knowledge obtained at the University in an actual job situation. Instructor consent required. Credit/No Credit. (3-0) Y

ACCT 4v00 Special Topics (1-3 semester hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. Graded credit/no credit only unless instructor permits letter grade. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) S

Business Administration

BA 1100 Business Basics (1 semester hour) This course is an introduction to the study of business, with exposure to each of the business disciplines. Students will be introduced to the functional areas of business, learn about social entrepreneurship, begin to plan their business careers, and present a simple business plan. Required for all freshman Naveen Jindal School of Management majors; open to all non-School of Management majors. Corequisite: UNIV 1010. (1-0) S

BA 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Business Administration in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

BA 4010 ENACTUS Participation (0 semester hours) This course is designed for students participating in Enactus for zero course credit. Students in Enactus partner with business and education leaders to take lessons learned in the classroom out to local communities in need of assistance. Instructor consent required. May be repeated (3 attempts maximum). Instructor consent required. Graded Credit/No Credit. (1-0) S

BA 4101 Careers in Management (1 semester hour) The primary objective of this course is to provide students with assistance in making effective career decisions. This is accomplished through the use of career assessments, informational interviews, development of a career plan, as well as both practical and theoretical readings and exercises. Students will prepare resumes, develop effective interviewing skills, explore networking, and job search techniques. (1-0) Y

BA 4199 Senior Honors in Business Administration (1 semester hour) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. Corequisite: BA 4299. (1-0) S

BA 4299 Thesis Research Methods and Writing Seminar (2 semester hours) This course will prepare Honors Students to write their Honors Thesis. Various research methods ranging from survey to archival will be discussed. Students will choose a method, pick a research question, and produce an outline and introduction to their thesis topic. Junior standing and instructor consent required. (2-0) S

BA 4v00 Special Topics (1-3 semester hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) S

BA 4v10 ENACTUS Service (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed for students participating in Enactus. Students in Enactus partner with business and education leaders to take lessons learned in the classroom out to local communities in need of assistance. Working with the community, the students develop quality community outreach programs that focus on one or more of eight core areas: (1) market economics, (2) entrepreneurship, (3) financial literacy, (4) success skills, (5) environmental sustainability, (6) business ethics, (7) female empowerment, and (8) support of the military. These projects will be developed and applied with the intent of creating a better business or educational situation for the community. The target group for these projects will be aspiring entrepreneurs, struggling business owners, low-income families, and school children. Instructor consent required. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). Graded Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

BA 4v90 Management Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) S

Business Communication

BCOM 2101 Basic Business Communication (1 semester hour) This course will provide an introduction to business writing and speaking with a particular emphasis on grammar, sentence structure, thought formation, and presentation skills. Class activities will emphasize communication in real-world business situations and enable students to begin developing their ability to write and speak effectively in the workplace. (1-0) S

BCOM 3311 Business Communication (3 semester hours) Introduction to various types of professional communication, with an emphasis on business writing. Students will gain experience writing and revising business email, letters, proposals, and job search documents. Students will work both individually and in teams and will exit the course with a clear understanding of the centrality of communication in business. Not eligible for audit. Prerequisites: RHET 1302 and (ACCT 3100 or BA 3100 or FIN 3100 or IMS 3100 or MKT 3100 or MIS 3100 or OPRE 3100). (3-0) S

BCOM 3320 Business Communication, Practices, and Culture: Spain and Latin America (3 semester hours) This course prepares students to maneuver the business environment in Spain and Lain America with a focus on technical communications, business practices, and the culture of business. Basic language skills are necessary to be able to more fully appreciate the business nuances involved in international business. Prerequisites: SPAN 1311 and SPAN 1312 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

BCOM 3321 Business Communication, Practices, and Culture: China (3 semester hours) This course prepares students to maneuver the business environment in China with a focus on technical communications, business practices, and the culture of business. Basic language skills are necessary to be able to more fully appreciate the business nuances involved in international business. Prerequisites: CHIN 1311 and CHIN 1312 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

BCOM 3322 Business Communication, Practices, and Culture: Japan (3 semester hours) This course prepares students to maneuver the business environment in Japan with a focus on technical communications, business practices, and the culture of business. Basic language skills are necessary to be able to more fully appreciate the business nuances involved in international business. Prerequisites: JAPN 1311 and JAPN 1312 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

BCOM 3323 Business Communication, Practices, and Culture: Germany (3 semester hours) This course prepares students to maneuver the business environment in Germany with a focus on technical communications, business practices, and the culture of business. Basic language skills are necessary to be able to more fully appreciate the business nuances involved in international business. Prerequisites: GERM 1311 and GERM 1312 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

BCOM 4350 Advanced Business Communication (3 semester hours) This course builds on BCOM 3311 by helping students work towards mastery of three critical communication competencies: business speaking, professional use of social media/technology in/for work, and the development of a professional online presence. Students will gain experience engaging in many different kinds of oral communication for business, both individually and in teams. Prerequisites: BCOM 3311 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

Business Policy and Strategy

BPS 4305 Strategic Management (3 semester hours) Capstone-level course requiring integration of all fields of business. Students will draw on their broadened awareness of various environmental influences (social and political) to solve business problems. Management alternatives will be examined with an ethical perspective relating policy trends to the strategic planning mode. Prerequisites: (BCOM 3311 and FIN 3320 and MIS 3300 and OPRE 3310 and OBHR 3310 and MKT 3300) and (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) S

BPS 4307 Corporations, Politics and Society (3 semester hours) Overview of the corporation as a political participant in the American political system. Topics include corporate political action committees, business lobbying, grassroots programs, Federal Election Campaign Act, and labor involvement. Prerequisite: BCOM 3311. (3-0) Y

Business Law

BLAW 2301 (BUSI 2301) Business and Public Law (3 semester hours) Commercial and administrative law, focusing on the American judicial and legislative process, the law of contracts, agency, torts and laws of partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations. (3-0) Y

BLAW 3301 Employment Law (3 semester hours) Introduction to the various legal issues that are involved in the modern employment relationship. The topics covered will include employment contracts, employment-at-will, anti-discrimination laws, occupational health and safety, pay equity, employee privacy, and other relevant topics. Prerequisite: BLAW 2301. (3-0) Y

BLAW 4301 International Law (3 semester hours) The course examines the nature, structure and sources of international law, the relationship between international law and domestic U.S. law, the role of international organizations such as the United Nations, World Trade Organization and Regional Organization such as European Union and NAFTA in international businesses. The course also deals with methods of resolving international disputes and conflicts, involving, firms and countries. Prerequisites: BLAW 2301 and IMS 3310. (3-0) Y

BLAW 4310 Current Issues in Business and Law (3 semester hours) This class will explore current business and legal issues. Topics covered will likely include employment issues, government regulation, social media and copyright, marketing, ethical business decision making, negligence, Constitutional issues, and many others. Prerequisite: BLAW 2301. (3-0) Y

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

ENTP 3301 Entrepreneurship (3 semester hours) Explores all aspects of entrepreneurship and the process of creating new ventures. Topics include innovation and entrepreneurship and the roles of both in the domestic and international economies, opportunity recognition and evaluation, feasibility analysis and validation of assumptions, customer identification, value propositions, business models, market entry strategies, bootstrapping, venture finance, and legal considerations. Student teams will develop a business concept, prepare a preliminary business plan and prepare and present an investor overview presentation. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. (3-0) Y

ENTP 3320 Start-up Launch I (3 semester hours) This course provides an opportunity for a student or a student team to develop a business concept and proceed toward the launch of a business. The course will follow a structured and defined methodology for the refinement and validation of a business concept based on leading industry practices. Participants will be selected and enrolled in the course on the basis of a proposal for a business concept, approved prior to registration in the course. Participant business ideas can come from many sources, including concepts or ideas developed in other entrepreneurship courses or during the Business Idea Competition. Additional resources including office space or laboratory facilities in the Venture Development Center may be applied for. Additionally, as concepts are refined, student teams may modify or pivot their approach during the semester with faculty support. Students will enroll and complete the course either individually or as a venture team. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 3321 Start-up Launch II (3 semester hours) Faculty mentored development of a business concept initiated in ENTP 3320. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 3322 Start-up Launch III (3 semester hours) Faculty mentored development of a business concept initiated in ENTP 3320. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 3323 Start-up Launch IV (3 semester hours) Faculty mentored development of a business concept initiated in ENTP 3320. Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 3360 Entrepreneurial Finance (3 semester hours) Explores the process of raising capital and managing financial resources in entrepreneurial ventures. Focus on forecasting cash flows, cash flow management, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure and the various financing methods and mechanisms available to entrepreneurs (bootstrapping, angel investors, venture capitalists, IPOs) seeking to raise capital for a new venture. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (Same as FIN 3360) (3-0) Y

ENTP 4311 Entrepreneurial Strategy & Business Models (3 semester hours) Students will learn to assess and conduct in-depth analyses of potential business opportunities, with an emphasis on entrepreneurial business strategies, innovative business models and the determinants of new venture success in high tech and other business environments. Alternative strategies and approaches for market entry and the growth of a new venture will be explored in both domestic and international environments. The application of these frameworks, tools and techniques will be illustrated with case studies and a project focused on evaluating an existing or new venture and making recommendations to its management. Prerequisites: (ENTP 3301 or instructor consent required) and sophomore standing. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4320 Small Business Management (3 semester hours) An integrative course designed to help students develop the skills and knowledge required to successfully establish and manage a small business. The course addresses major problem areas faced by smaller companies, including development of systems and processes to monitor and run the business, legal issues in launching and growing the business, building and maintaining customer relationships, promotional planning, team building, conflict resolution, personnel and compensation issues, and development of exit strategies. The course will also address special issues unique to managing a family business and franchising. Prerequisites: ENTP 3301 or Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4330 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3 semester hours) This course addresses the marketing challenges facing the entrepreneurial firm, including the introduction and marketing of new products and services without the benefit of an established reputation, channel infrastructure or customer base. Topics include the development of marketing strategies, channel selection and design, product positioning, competitive pricing strategies, advertising and promotion, etc., all within the framework of the resource and reputational limitations inherent in a new venture, whether in the context of an entrepreneurial startup or an established organization. Prerequisites: ENTP 3301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4340 Social Entrepreneurship (3 semester hours) This course will explore the role and importance of the non-profit sector and the unique place it occupies in 21st century life. The course will develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks appropriate for understanding the processes and challenges of non-profit ventures in the social sector. Student teams will work with selected non-profits in the local community on projects focused on the issues and challenges of mission definition, service delivery, business practices, fund-raising and governance. Prerequisites: at least junior standing. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4350 Corporate Entrepreneurship (3 semester hours) This course seeks to equip student with the skills required to develop new ideas and create viable new businesses within the context of an established organization. The course will address the development of an internal culture of innovation, processes for reviewing ideas and for developing business concepts, strategic analysis, and positioning for competitive advantage. The course will address both domestic and international corporate entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: (ENTP 3301 or instructor consent required), and at least junior standing. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4360 Innovation & Creativity (3 semester hours) This course will explore individual creativity and organizational innovation. Topics will include the nature of creativity, the development of an innovative mind-set in individuals, the antecedents and processes of individual and group creativity, the barriers to and management of corporate innovation, and the development of the managerial skills essential to the stimulation and management of group creativity and innovation. The course will be organized around a series of individual and team-based innovation challenges. Prerequisites: at least junior standing. (3-0) Y

ENTP 4v90 Innovation and Entrepreneurship Internship (1-3 semester hours) This internship course must be directly related to your concentration or minor in innovation and entrepreneurship. Students gain experience and improve skills through appropriate work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester, students prepare a presentation describing their work experience and work output. Consent of the JSOM Internship Coordinator and the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program is required. Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) Y

Finance

FIN 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Finance in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

FIN 3300 Personal Finance (3 semester hours) This course is designed to help students prepare for a financially challenging world and to introduce the concepts and methods of personal financial planning. The financial planning process, the time value of money, taxation, credit, budgeting, housing, insurance, and employee benefits will be explored. The course will enable students to manage their finances and develop their own personal financial plans. (3-0) S

FIN 3305 Real Estate Principles (3 semester hours) Survey of various aspects of the real estate business and economics, including marketing, finance, taxation, investment, development, law, appraisal, and valuation. (Same as REAL 3305) (3-0) S

FIN 3320 Business Finance (3 semester hours) Introduction to financial decision making and the valuation of business enterprises, with a particularly focus on the use of discounted cash flow techniques in the selection of capital investment projects. Additional topics include financial planning, exchange rates, risk and return trade-offs in financial markets, financing decisions and dividend policy. Prerequisite or corequisite: (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360) and Prerequisites: (ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333), and MIS 3300. (3-0) S

FIN 3330 Personal Financial Planning (3 semester hours) Application of principles of financial management to lifetime consumption and retirement planning, with an emphasis on the integration of savings and investment decisions with life insurance programs and estate planning. Topics include the role of property, health, life insurance; tax-deferred investment vehicles, as well as fixed income and equity investment alternatives such as mutual funds. Open only to students majoring in either finance or accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and MATH 1326 and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333), and (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) S

FIN 3340 Regulation of Business and Financial Markets (3 semester hours) Examines the legal and regulatory environment of business and financial markets. Comparisons between the impact of laws and their original intent are considered, as well as their ethical dimensions. Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 3320. (3-0) S

FIN 3350 Financial Markets and Institutions (3 semester hours) Examines the operation of financial markets and financial intermediaries, along with their role in providing financing to the public and private sectors. Topics covered include the banking system, markets for short-term securities, financial derivatives, and market for foreign exchange. Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 3320. (3-0) Y

FIN 3360 Entrepreneurial Finance (3 semester hours) Explores the process of raising capital and managing financial resources in entrepreneurial ventures. Focus on forecasting cash flows, cash flow management, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure and the various financing methods and mechanisms available to entrepreneurs (bootstrapping, angel investors, venture capitalists, IPOs) seeking to raise capital for a new venture. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (Same as ENTP 3360) (3-0) Y

FIN 3365 Real Estate Finance and Advanced Principles (3 semester hours) Survey of the institutions in real estate finance and factors affecting the flow of funds; investment analysis and procedures involved in real estate financing. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (Same as REAL 3365) (3-0) S

FIN 3370 Insurance and Risk Management (3 semester hours) Study of insurance products and associated risk management issues. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (3-0) Y

FIN 3380 International Financial Management (3 semester hours) Study of world financial markets and institutions, foreign exchange exposure and management, foreign direct investment, and issues of financial management of multinational firms. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (3-0) Y

FIN 3390 Introduction to Financial Modeling (3 semester hours) Develops the ability to use quantitative methods and software (particularly spreadsheet) for financial decision making. Prerequisites: (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333) and (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360), and FIN 3320. (3-1) S

FIN 4300 Investment Management (3 semester hours) Examines a wide range of issues concerning management of investments and so provides an understanding of the role of modern financial theory in pricing financial assets and managing portfolios. Prerequisite: FIN 3320 and (prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 3390). (3-0) S

FIN 4310 Intermediate Business Finance (3 semester hours) Builds on FIN 3320 to develop additional topics in business financial decision making. It integrates a variety of advanced topics in developing a firm's financial strategy. Prerequisite: FIN 3320 and (prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 3390). (3-0) S

FIN 4320 Management of Financial Institutions (3 semester hours) Study of the financial management of commercial banks and other financial intermediaries, with an emphasis on the analysis of financial performance, lending decisions, asset-liability management, and the management of institutional capital requirements. Strategic considerations such as evolving information technology, the changing regulatory environment and the impact of global competition in financial services will also be examined. Prerequisite: FIN 3350. (3-0) T

FIN 4321 Real Estate Law and Contracts (3 semester hours) Study of the legal principles governing real estate transactions. Topics include contract law, estates in land, forms of ownership, deeds, mortgages, title insurance, agency and homestead. Prerequisite or corequisite: REAL 3305 or FIN 3305. (Same as REAL 4321) (3-0) Y

FIN 4328 Real Estate Valuation (3 semester hours) This capstone real estate course provides the theory and methods of residential and income property valuation and appraisal. Topics include the three major approaches to appraising real estate, regression analysis, real estate market analysis, highest and best use analysis and capitalization techniques. Income property valuation techniques are emphasized. Several cases and problems are presented and solved. Prerequisites: ((REAL 3305 or FIN 3305) or (REAL 3365 or FIN 3365)) and FIN 3320. (Same as REAL 4328) (3-0) Y

FIN 4330 Estate Planning (3 semester hours) This course provides a basic understanding of the estate and gift tax system, including planning strategies. It addresses the transfer, administration, and taxation of property within the estate planning context. Topics include transfers of property outright or with trusts, wills, and powers of appointment; use of the marital deduction; valuation of assets; and buy-sell agreements. Prerequisites: FIN 3330. (3-0) R

FIN 4335 Financial Aspects of Retirement and Employee Benefits (3 semester hours) This course focuses on business and individual retirement plans, planning strategies to meet individual and client goals as well as retirement distribution strategies. Students will evaluate employer and non-employer benefit plans and use a combination of financial planning software to create retirement plans. Prerequisite: FIN 3330. (3-0) Y

FIN 4340 Options and Futures Markets (3 semester hours) Examines valuation of derivative securities, such as options and futures contracts, and the use of these instruments in managing business and financial risks. Topics include pricing of futures contracts, swaps, and options, and use of derivative instruments in hedging, portfolio insurance, and exotic options. Prerequisite: FIN 4300 or FIN 4310. (3-0) Y

FIN 4345 Financial Information and Trading (3 semester hours) This course examines the sources and uses of financial information in valuing and trading securities, as well as the structure of trading in security markets. Prerequisite: FIN 3390. (3-0) Y

FIN 4350 Cases in Personal Financial Planning (3 semester hours) This course refines skills necessary to help individuals, families, and business owners reach financial goals. Topic areas include investment planning, insurance planning and risk management, income tax planning, estate planning, retirement planning, and employee benefits planning. Students are required to prepare written, comprehensive financial plans and to present them orally. Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 4330 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 4360 Cases in Financial Management (3 semester hours) This course uses case studies to study different financial management issues. Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 4310 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 4380 Domestic Fund Management (3 semester hours) For students involved in the practice of investment management for the university. This course requires faculty consent and may be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Prerequisite: FIN 4300. (3-0) R

FIN 4390 Seminar Series in Finance (3 semester hours) Examination of selected financial topics. Requires approval of the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum). (3-0) R

FIN 4399 Senior Honors in Finance (3 semester hours) For students conducting independent research for honors theses or projects. Requires faculty sponsor approval. (3-0) R

FIN 4v80 Practicum in Finance (1-3 semester hours) For students engaged in the practice of financial analysis or management. Requires approval of undergraduate program director. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) R

FIN 4v90 Individual Study in Finance (1-3 semester hours) For students interested in pursuing further study of a topic in finance. This course requires faculty sponsor approval and completion of either FIN 4300 or FIN 4310. In addition, it may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 hours. ([1-3]-0) R

Healthcare Management

HMGT 3311 Healthcare Accounting (3 semester hours) This course will help students develop the critical ability to make financial decisions that reduce risk and create economic value. Using hospital and physician group practice data, participants learn how to: read and interpret healthcare financial statements, using discounted cash flows to make investment decisions that create economic value, financially evaluate a proposed healthcare acquisition, partnership or joint venture, determine how much a medical practice or healthcare organization is really worth, and review internal controls. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 (3-0) Y

HMGT 4301 Introduction to Healthcare Management (3 semester hours) An overview of the U.S. healthcare system - topics include the issues of cost, quality, and access. Financing of the system and healthcare policy will be covered and the role of hospitals, physicians, and managed care organizations will be examined. Prerequisite: MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417. (3-0) Y

HMGT 4321 Introduction to Healthcare Information Systems (3 semester hours) Examines key processes in healthcare organizations and how information systems support the delivery of healthcare services. The course also deals with issues surrounding the selection, implementation, and use of electronic medical records (EMR) and provides opportunities to work hands-on with EMR software. Prerequisites: HMGT 4301 and MIS 3300. (Same as MIS 4320) (3-0) Y

HMGT 4331 Marketing in Healthcare Organizations (3 semester hours) An overview of marketing & business planning principles oriented to settings such as hospitals and outpatient clinics. Traditional marketing models are related to the healthcare industry as students are familiarized with concepts critical to understanding business development for healthcare professionals, including: industry data, market analysis, relevant stakeholders and patient flow through the continuum of care. Prerequisites: HMGT 4301 and MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

HMGT 4341 Human Resources Management in Healthcare Organizations (3 semester hours) An introduction to the employee life cycle in healthcare organizations, including: recruitment, candidate selection, credentialing, record retention, performance management, staff retention, disciplinary action and termination. Students will explore topics pertinent to the management and development of staff and will be familiarized with federal legislation commonly encountered in human resources, including: NLRA, OSHA, EEOA, ERISA and FLSA. Prerequisites: HMGT 4301 and OBHR 3310. (3-0) Y

HMGT 4351 Management, Design and Optimization of Healthcare Processes (3 semester hours) An interactive, experiential course in which students will utilize hands-on, practice-oriented opportunities to learn how to design, manage and optimize healthcare processes. Advanced analytical techniques for healthcare process optimization will also be discussed. (3-0) Y

HMGT 4v90 Management Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

International Management Studies

IMS 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Global Business in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

IMS 3310 International Business (3 semester hours) Examination of worldwide patterns of trade and investment. Overview of financial, managerial, and marketing problems confronted by multinational firms. Prerequisites: ECON 2301 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) S

IMS 3v91 Regional Management Area Studies: Latin America (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in Latin America. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 3v92 Regional Management Area Studies: Western Europe (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in Europe. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 3v93 Regional Management Area Studies: Asia (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in Asia. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 3v94 Regional Management Area Studies: Africa (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in Africa. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 3v95 Regional Management Area Studies: North America (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in North America. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3 ]-0) R

IMS 3v96 Regional Management Area Studies: Eastern Europe (1-3 semester hours) This course familiarizes students with the historical, social, economic, and political background of nations in Eastern Europe. Students will learn about the business environment of the area and participate in seminars on firms that operate in and have an economic impact in the area. Prerequisite: IMS 3310. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 4310 Export Market Development (3 semester hours) Survey of factors affecting export markets. Examination of free trade versus strategic trade; trade protectionism; role and influence of the WTO; impact of regional trade agreements (e.g. NAFTA, EU); supply chain management, logistics and distribution challenges; and trade finance. Prerequisites: IMS 3310 and BLAW 4301. (3-0) Y

IMS 4320 International Marketing (3 semester hours) Analysis of environment of international marketing. Survey of techniques of international marketing management. Prerequisites: IMS 3310 and MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

IMS 4325 International Advertising and Promotion (3 semester hours) This course will look at the major trends and strategies associated with global promotions and advertising. In today's world, the major global brands keep growing larger in value and influence and the smaller brands just entering global markets are growing in numbers. Students will analyze these brands and businesses as they make the needed adjustments or adaptations in advertising and promotions to be culturally relevant and sensitive. Prerequisites: IMS 3310 and MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

IMS 4330 Global Human Resource Management (3 semester hours) The course examines cultural complexity in the uncontrollable business environments in foreign markets. The course covers management of problems derived from cultural differences, the lack of adaptability of expatriates and their families in host countries, and recruitment, training and motivation for international assignments. Prerequisites: OBHR 3310 and IMS 3310 (3-0) Y

IMS 4332 International Negotiation (3 semester hours) This course explores the theories, processes and practical techniques of negotiations in situations where partners to the negotiation come from different national cultures, political, legal and economic systems. Topics include the basics of international negotiations, cultural influences on negotiations, culture-specific strategies and tactics used in the negotiation process, and qualities that an international negotiator must possess. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. Prerequisites: OBHR 4352 and IMS 4330. (3-0) Y

IMS 4334 International Leadership (3 semester hours) Addresses the challenge of leading organizations in a dynamic global environment. Overall goal is to not only question one's assumptions about leadership, but also enhance skills and acquire new content knowledge. Topics include visionary and transformational leadership; empowerment; leveraging and combining resources; designing organizations; and ethics. Prerequisites: OBHR 4350 and IMS 4330. (3-0) Y

IMS 4373 Global Strategy (3 semester hours) Study of the challenges that multinational firms face, including managing across national borders, managing international strategic alliances, managing headquarters-subsidiary relationships, and developing global capabilities. Prerequisites: (IMS 3310 and IMS 4320 and FIN 3380 and BLAW 4301). (3-0) Y

IMS 4v81 Individual Study in International Management (1-3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

IMS 4v90 Management Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

IMS 4v94 Seminar Series in International Management (3 semester hours) Discussion of selected topics and theories in organizational behavior, strategy and international management. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

Management Information Systems

MIS 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Management Information Systems in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

MIS 3300 Introduction to Management Information Systems (3 semester hours) Examines key business processes in organizations and how information systems support the execution and management of these processes. The course also deals with how to structure and manipulate data that might typically be found in an information system using the database management system, MS Access, and spreadsheet software, MS Excel, to make business decisions. (3-0) S

MIS 3310 Introduction to Social Network Technology (3 semester hours) The course helps students apply the latest Internet-based technologies in both their personal and academic lives. Further, it explores how consumer-oriented businesses utilize these technologies. The course is a hands-on, interactive course where the students can share their current knowledge with others in the class and learn the latest applications of various online technologies. Finally, the course introduces students to the application and use of advanced technology on the UT Dallas campus. (3-0) Y

MIS 3320 Business Analytics Using Excel (3 semester hours) A focus on practical IT skills required to model and solve business problems. It is an interdisciplinary course that draws upon problems from accounting, finance, marketing, production, and human resource fields. The course emphasizes learning-by-doing using Excel and its add-ons as the primary tool. Students taking this class are required to have a laptop. Prerequisite: MIS 3300. (3-0) Y

MIS 4300 Database Fundamentals (3 semester hours) Introduces the basic concepts for the design and development of relational databases and database management. Topics include entity-relationship data model, logical database design, data administration, Structured Query Language, and database management issues, such as concurrency control, data security, and integrity. A database management system software package is used to implement working database systems. Prerequisites: MIS 3300 and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417). (Same as ACCT 4300) (3-0) Y

MIS 4301 Database Systems (3 semester hours) Introduces the basic concepts of relational databases. The emphasis is on relational database structure and the use of relational databases for query retrievals and report generation. Structured Query Language (SQL) will be covered extensively. Applications of databases for accounting, finance, marketing, and other areas of business will be discussed. Cannot be used to satisfy the requirements of BS in MIS degree. Prerequisites: (ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 and MIS 3300) and (MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417). (3-0) Y

MIS 4310 Programming in Java (3 semester hours) Business application development using Java. Topics include the fundamentals of Java programming, applets programming for web-based systems, and object-oriented programming concepts. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4312 Mobile Web Application Development (3 semester hours) Provides an introduction to mobile web application development. A mobile web application is developed using a combination of CSS, HTML5, JavaScript, and PHP. Emphasis is given to hands on application of course material through development of a web application prototype under conditions simulating a business environment. Prior programming knowledge is highly recommended. (3-0) Y

MIS 4320 Introduction to Healthcare Information Systems (3 semester hours) Examines key processes in healthcare organizations and how information systems support the delivery of healthcare services. The course also deals with issues surrounding the selection, implementation, and use of electronic medical records (EMR) and provides opportunities to work hands-on with EMR software. Prerequisites: HMGT 4301 and MIS 3300. (Same as HMGT 4321) (3-0) Y

MIS 4330 Systems Analysis and Design (3 semester hours) An overview of systems development methodologies will be presented. In addition to concepts in systems analysis and design, the students will be exposed to concepts in project management, and information gathering techniques. Projects focusing on the use of CASE tools will also be an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: (MIS 4310 or MIS 4312) and (MIS 4300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4340 Enterprise Resource Planning (3 semester hours) This course provides an understanding of the practical use of enterprise resource planning systems in modern business. The course provides an understanding of integrated business processes in ERP systems, project management approaches, ERP development methodologies, and ERP architectures. ERP concepts are reinforced with hands on transaction experience in the SAP ERP system. Topics associated with creating an information systems implementation proposal for an executive team are discussed. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4342 Analysis and Design of Accounting Systems (3 semester hours) Students are introduced to accounting system analysis and design tools and methods. The course emphasizes business processes, accounting transaction flows, internal control and accounting information systems as part of enterprise systems. Prerequisites: (ACCT 3331 with a minimum grade of C) and (Prerequisite or corequisite: ACCT 3332). (Same as ACCT 4342) (3-0) S

MIS 4350 Introduction to Business Intelligence and Data Mining (3 semester hours) This course will introduce various data mining techniques to extract business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including association, customer segmentation, classification, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems and web mining. Students will also be exposed to various business intelligence software such as XLMiner, SAS EnterpriseMiner or SQL Server 2008 (depending on availability). Prerequisites: (MIS 4300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) T

MIS 4351 Enterprise Data Warehouses (3 semester hours) Data warehouses enable firms to effectively consolidate, arrange and analyze vast amounts of data. This course will explore the theory and practice of data warehouses for enterprises. The course will examine the components of an enterprise data warehouse, model the relational database required for an enterprise data warehouse, extract, cleanse, consolidate, and transform heterogeneous data into a single enterprise data warehouse, and run queries using a data warehouse. The course currently uses SAP BW and Business Objects as the tools for hands-on experience. Prerequisite: (MIS 4300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4352 Introduction to Web Analytics (3 semester hours) Introduces technologies and tools used to realize the full potential of web sites. The course focuses on collection and use of web data such as web traffic and visitor information to design web sites that will enable firms to acquire, convert, and retain customers. Online advertising such as paid search and web analytics tools will also be included. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4360 Network and Information Security (3 semester hours) With the advances in information technology, security of information assets has become a keenly debated issue for organizations. While much focus has been paid to technical aspects of the problem, managing information security requires more than technology. Effective information security management demands a clear understanding of technical as well as socio-organizational aspects of the problem. The purpose of this course is to prepare business decision makers who recognize the threats and vulnerabilities present in current information systems and who know how to design and develop secure systems. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4361 Business Data Communications (3 semester hours) The course will focus on currently observed industry trends, including the digital convergence of voice, video and data, enterprise wide connectivity, distributed computing environments, and the massive demand for Internet-based open systems. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4370 Information Systems Management (3 semester hours) Management of the information technology within an organization is a critical activity. Students will be introduced to issues relating to IT investment, management of IT, and using IT for competitive advantage. Prerequisites: (MIS 3300 and MATH 1326) and (MATH 2333 or OPRE 3333 or MATH 2418 or MATH 2415 or CS 2305). (3-0) Y

MIS 4390 Information Systems Capstone (3 semester hours) Project-based capstone course. Student groups apply management information systems principles and techniques to analyze, design and test information systems. They also analyze organizational impacts associated with acquiring, designing, developing and delivering information systems solutions. As a designated communication-enhanced course, MIS 4390 also focuses on the refinement of students' business communications skills and their use of writing as a critical-thinking and learning tool. Prerequisite: MIS 4330. (3-0) Y

MIS 4v81 Individual Study in MIS (1-3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

MIS 4v90 MIS Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's MIS knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real MIS environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

MIS 4v95 Seminar Series in Information Systems (1-3 semester hours) Discussion of selected topics and theories in information systems. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

Marketing Management

MKT 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Marketing in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

MKT 3300 Principles of Marketing (3 semester hours) An overview of marketing principles including marketing planning, understanding customer's decision making environment, measurement of market performance, product and branding decisions, advertising and promotions, pricing, and distribution. Special emphasis placed upon the determination and evaluation of market segments. (3-0) S

MKT 3320 Product and Brand Management (3 semester hours) C3 Certified. This course discusses concepts and cases of planning, building, measuring and management of brands and products. It covers topics such as product management, branding, brand equity, product and service quality, brand positioning, perceptual mapping, long term brand management, and the product life cycle. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

MKT 3330 Introduction to Professional Selling (3 semester hours) C3 Certified. This course covers professional selling practices and philosophies at an introductory level. Personal selling skills including developing and qualifying prospects, creating a sales presentation, closing techniques and servicing the sales will be covered for business to business sales. Sales ethics, account relationship management and basic professional networking will also be included. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

MKT 3340 Marketing Research (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of the entire marketing research process, which involves collecting and analyzing data to facilitate better marketing decisions. Specific topics include problem definition, research design, use of secondary data, collecting primary data, designing surveys, sampling, fieldwork, basic data analysis, and reporting of findings. Students are expected to know basic marketing and have an aptitude for quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) Y

MKT 4321 Marketing Strategy (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of how strategy is developed in marketing. This course emphasizes the integration of knowledge from previous marketing courses and related disciplines. Topics include planning and development of policies, implementation and evaluation of the entire marketing strategy. Case analyses are employed to also understand how to monitor and respond to competition. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

MKT 4322 Price Management (3 semester hours) The course teaches students how to set and manage price for products and services based on an understanding of costs, competition, price elasticity, and consumer perceptions based on price. The study also establishes the links between positioning / segmentation and pricing. Students will learn to use break even analysis, to compute price elasticity, and to evaluate price-quality trade-offs. They will also learn how to manage price in response to competitor's price changes. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) Y

MKT 4330 Digital and Internet Marketing (3 semester hours) The course provides an introduction to using direct marketing in the digital and social media environment as well as traditional direct response media such as print, DRTV and others. The course has special emphasis on the use of different Internet platforms in direct marketing such as email, paid search and social media (YouTube, Linkedin, Facebook, Twitter). Students will learn how online databases can be accessed for direct marketing purposes. Students will learn how to create and manage a paid search advertising campaign using Google AdWords. Students will have hands on practice through several labs that will cover: importing and exporting data, merging and purging (duplicate) records; using YouTube; creating and running a Google Ads campaign. The measurability and accountability of direct marketing is stressed including Excel based direct marketing math such as return on promotion calculations. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

MKT 4331 Sales Customer Relationship Management (3 semester hours) This course covers the methods and metrics, including the tools and software, that are used to manage existing customers and prospects for new customers using specialized CRM software. Focus is on customer relationship management strategy for the purpose of strategic sales account management and prospecting. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and MIS 3300 and MKT 3330. (3-0) Y

MKT 4332 Advanced Personal Selling (3 semester hours) The course covers advanced personal selling skills, practices and programs. Emphasis will be placed on sales, presentations, demonstrations, advanced sales techniques, advanced communication and relationship-building skills. Various corporate sales strategies for both consumer and business sales will be explored. This course is intended to prepare students for competitive sales situations and competitions and is primarily intended for students interested in sales careers. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and MKT 3330 and BCOM 3311, and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 4333 Retailing and Distribution: (3 semester hours) This course will discuss retailing and distribution including merchandising, positioning strategies, inventory management, pricing, buying functions, advertising and promotion, atmospherics as well as customer satisfaction. Additionally, the course will provide the student with a comprehensive view of retailing and an application of marketing concepts in a practical retail environment along with channel management decisions, channel design, logistics and management of channel relationships. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

MKT 4334 Social Media Marketing (3 semester hours) This course teaches special considerations in social media market research, consumer behavior and segmentation as well as how to develop a sound social media strategy (content curation) and content management (Hootsuite, Wordpress). The course will also familiarize students with best practices, case studies and tactical considerations using current popular platforms such as Facebook, Google Plus, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, Wordpress, YouTube and others. The metrics of social media will also be covered using both the tools provided by these platforms as well as by third party tools such as Netbase, Tweetstats, etc. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

MKT 4340 Consumer Behavior (3 semester hours) This course covers the theories and research findings to understand how and why consumers make purchase decisions. Topics include information search and information processing models, perception, evaluation of alternatives, consideration set formation and psychological aspects of household decision making. Students apply these concepts to practical design and marketing of new products. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

MKT 4350 Advertising (3 semester hours) This course examines the principles and practices of advertising, public relations and promotions. Topics include: the role of the ad agency; the advertising plan based on marketing, research, and consumer behavior; integrated marketing communications; communication goals and measurement, advertising, budgeting, advertising buying, media planning, media scheduling, and art, copy, creativity and production of ads in different media. We also discuss social, ethical and legal issues in advertising. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and MKT 3320. (3-0) Y

MKT 4351 Business and the Digital Environment (3 semester hours) This course will expose students to a variety of business issues that have arisen relative to the digital revolution. Companies have been forced to change the way they do business, sell products, distribute products and reach consumers. Students will explore a series of business cases that address overcoming and adapting to disruptive technology, product development, business strategy, managing creative organizations, innovation, intellectual property development, and entrepreneurship. Students will participate in a real life business simulation by developing a business plan or business case for a new start up, product or service in this digital economy. Prerequisites: FIN 3320 and MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

MKT 4360 Services Marketing (3 semester hours) Services (e.g. healthcare, financial, retailing, travel and entertainment, and public sectors) represent about 70% of the US economy. Students will obtain a good grounding regarding the elements of marketing that are important in a service industry. Major topics covered include service design, managing capacity and yield, managing customer relationships and satisfaction, and managing service personnel and operations. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and MKT 3330. (3-0) Y

MKT 4370 Marketing Projects (3 semester hours) Sponsored by local industries, these project provide the students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained to solve real world challenging problems in the area of marketing. Students will interact with industry leaders and gain some industry specific knowledge. Subject to availability, check with the marketing department before enrolling. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. (3-0) Y

MKT 4380 Capstone Course in Marketing (3 semester hours) C3 Certified. Students (in teams) are expected to make marketing decisions and compete with other teams to achieve superior performance in terms of market share, profitability and stock price. The course will use marketing simulation to teach practical decision making. Students will make decisions regarding new product specifications, price, production, sales force and advertising as in a real life situation. This course integrates the strategic and the tactical aspects of marketing. Prerequisites: MKT 3320 and MKT 3330 and MKT 3340 and MIS 3300 and FIN 3320. (3-0) Y

MKT 4v83 Individual Study in Marketing (1-3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

MKT 4v90 Marketing Internship (1-3 semester hours) This internship course must be directly related to your major in marketing. Students are expected to complete assignments satisfactorily during the semester and complete the online evaluation at the end of the semester. Information related to assignments or evaluation will be available in the course syllabi. Student must meet internship eligibility guidelines available from the internship coordinator. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum over 2 semesters). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) Y

MKT 4v93 Seminar Series in Marketing (1-3 semester hours) Discussion of selected topics and theories in marketing. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

Organizational Behavior/Human Resources

OBHR 3310 Organizational Behavior (3 semester hours) An integrated social science approach is taken to enable students to better understand their work environments and the issues that arise from the complex interplay among organizational members. This course explores theories and concepts derived from diverse fields such as psychology, sociology, economics, and anthropology. The topics include: motivation, attitudes, ethics, communication, leadership, teamwork, power, negotiation, and culture. Prerequisites: RHET 1302 and MATH 1325. (3-0) S

OBHR 3311 Principles of Management (3 semester hours) This course will introduce students to the connections between areas in management, emphasizing the role that organizational behavior plays in the functioning of the organization. Students will have the opportunity to learn and implement ideas through the use of exercises and case studies. The student will gain useful tools to identify problems in organizations, apply solutions and understand outcomes. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. (3-0) S

OBHR 3320 Groups and Teams (3 semester hours) This course focuses on how groups and teams can be used to maximize organizational success. Students will be introduced to theories and concepts that will allow them to analyze and manage groups in organizations. Topics will include building teams, managing teams, the opportunities and challenges of diversity in teams, managing conflict, and leadership. Practical experience will be developed through the use of exercises, case-studies, and the completion of a team project. Prerequisites: OBHR 3300 and OBHR 3310. (3-0) T

OBHR 3330 Introduction to Human Resource Management (3 semester hours) This course is an overview of human resource management. Students will learn theories and practices in many different "core" areas of human resource management including staffing, performance management, work and job design, training, compensation, and labor relations. The course also examines how the human resource function contributes to the company's business strategy and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: OBHR 3310. (3-0) T

OBHR 4300 Management of Non-Profit Organizations (3 semester hours) This course examines the role of non-profit organizations in today's society and discusses the challenges of managing a non-profit both internally and externally concerning areas such as leadership, mission, program planning, budgeting, personnel, marketing, fundraising, volunteerism, and cross-sector collaboration. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. (3-0) Y

OBHR 4310 Business Ethics (3 semester hours) This course examines ethical and socio-political issues and concepts that relate to management in a global business environment. Leaders increasingly need to be aware of potential threats and opportunities in their environments and many stem from value and cultural differences that most managers are not trained to resolve. Prerequisites: OBHR 3310 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) S

OBHR 4331 Compensation and Benefits Administration (3 semester hours) This course focuses on how managers can strategically utilize compensation to attract, retain, and motivate qualified employees. Students will gain an understanding of the multidisciplinary theories underlying pay system design and implementation. Attention will be given to principles underlying successful compensation systems, including internal alignment, external competitiveness, and pay-for-performance. Prerequisites: OBHR 3310 and OBHR 3330 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OBHR 4333 Performance Management (3 semester hours) This course examines the continuous process of identifying measuring, and developing the performance of individuals and teams and aligning their performance with the strategic goals of the organization. Special attention will be placed on developing performance management systems for small and large, for-profit and not-for-profit, and domestic and global organizations, and in all industry segments. Prerequisites: (OBHR 3310 and OBHR 4350) and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) T

OBHR 4334 Talent Acquisition and Management (3 semester hours) This course focuses on the effective management of the flow of talent into and through organizations. It covers human resource planning, recruiting and selection, career transitions and other workforce movement. An important goal of the class will be to provide opportunities to develop hands-on skills that are relevant to effectively managing talent flow. Acquisition and development of human resources in organizations and career management for individuals. Some emphasis on using data systems to perform human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, training, socialization, career development, and withdrawal from work. Prerequisites: (OBHR 3310 and OBHR 3330) and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) T

OBHR 4350 Introduction to Leading and Managing (3 semester hours) This course will deal with theories and techniques of leadership and management. The course will start with a general overview of major theories on leadership and management. The main focus of this course is on the relationship between individual action and group and organizational performance. Prerequisites: OBHR 3310 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OBHR 4352 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester hours) This course explores the theories, processes and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal and group settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OBHR 4354 Leading Organizational Change (3 semester hours) This course will emphasize practical skills required to be an effective change agent. Theories and techniques of planned and transformative organizational change will be discussed, along with topics that include change agent entry in change projects, negotiating role expectations, contracting, diagnostic interviewing and needs assessment, overcoming resistance to change, large group intervention processes, and cross-cultural differences in leadership expectations. Prerequisite: OBHR 3310. (3-0) T

OBHR 4356 Power and Influence in Organizations (3 semester hours) This course will examine the role that power plays in organizations and the ways in which influence can be developed and used to increase individual power. Focus will be placed on how individuals can increase their power from anywhere within the organization. Topics will include functions of power, sources of power, assessing power in organizations, and personal influence strategies and tactics. Prerequisite: OBHR 3310. (3-0) Y

OBHR 4358 Transformational Leadership, Ethics, and Social Responsibility in Practice (3 semester hours) This is a hands-on course to help students understand how transformational leaders can change the people around him/her to create productive societies with sustainable institutions and practices. This course starts with an introduction to transformational leadership concepts and basic ideas from both western and eastern moral philosophical traditions. Armed with a good understanding of these leadership and ethical concepts students will be given opportunities to work on a real project with one of the not-for-profit charitable organizations in the DFW area. This will not only help them practice what they have learned in the classroom setting but also help the community and practice transformational leadership behavior. Prerequisites: OBHR 3310 and OBHR 4300 and OBHR 4350. (3-0) Y

OBHR 4360 Advanced Organizational Behavior and Leadership (3 semester hours) Focus is on the successes and failures of enterprises and the people who run them. We examine the essential elements of leadership in businesses that either lead to sustainable competitive advantage or take the company into crisis and decline. Prerequisites: (OBHR 3310 and OBHR 4350) and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OBHR 4v84 Individual Study (1-3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

OBHR 4v90 Management Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

OBHR 4v94 Seminar Series in Management (1-3 semester hours) Discussion of selected topics and theories in organizational behavior, strategy and international management. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

Operations Research

OPRE 3100 Professional Development (1 semester hour) This course is required for all students majoring in Supply Chain management in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. This course is designed to enhance the student's experience in the Naveen Jindal School of Management. Students will work on networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette training, and learn how to increase their human capital. Students will also work on projects geared towards career management and overall professional development as a business major. The goal of this class is to make the student a more marketable and valuable professional to the global economy. Students will learn and attend class using hybrid system of online training and on campus training. Only one professional development course (credit) may be applied toward your degree plan. Not repeated for credit. (1-0) S

OPRE 3310 Operations Management (3 semester hours) Applications of operations research methods to production problems. Production processes in the business firm with emphasis on forecasting, production planning, and production control techniques. Prerequisites: (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419) and (MATH 2333 or MATH 2418 or CS 2305 or OPRE 3333) and Prerequisite or corequisite: (STAT 3360 or OPRE 3360). (3-0) S

OPRE 3320 Supply Chain Management (3 semester hours) Introduction to the key players and challenges in a supply chain management (SCM). Type of facilities, inventory and transportation options and the role of information in running supply chain is discussed. The objectives of different players in SCs are laid out and contrasted with each other. This motivates the discussion of integration/coordination of the players, a central theme in SC management. Operations and tradeoffs in service supply chains (i.e., air/sea lines, health care, hotels, and restaurants) are examined. Prerequisites: OPRE 3310. (3-0) S

OPRE 3330 Project Management (3 semester hours) The objective of this course is to provide students with the tools and techniques needed to initiate and manage a project effectively. The course will enhance the ability of students to respond to the challenges of large-scale projects so that they can be more effective as project managers. The course also examines the modern project management concepts, models, and techniques and reviews case studies so students can develop practical skills necessary to be successful in the field. (3-0) S

OPRE 3333 Quantitative Business Analysis (3 semester hours) Provides students with the analytical tools necessary for making better management decisions. Students are introduced to mathematical techniques used to make different types of business decisions. Prerequisite: MATH 1325 or MATH 2413 or MATH 2417. Credit cannot be received for both courses, OPRE 3333 or MATH 2333. (3-0) S

OPRE 3360 Managerial Methods in Decision Making Under Uncertainty (3 semester hours) Introduces the concept of probability and statistics to managerial decision making. Concepts will be developed in lecture and exercises using software packages. Topics include: summarizing and presenting data, probability theory, sampling, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, and ANOVA. Emphasis will be given to modeling and solving business problems in Finance, Marketing, Accounting, and Operations Management. Credit cannot be received for both courses, OPRE 3360 or STAT 3360. Prerequisite: (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OPRE 4310 Lean and Six Sigma Processes (3 semester hours) Topics covered include concepts and theory of quality control in manufacturing and service operations, analysis of product design and process capability, and statistical process control. In this course, students will develop a broad understanding of Lean and Six Sigma principles and practice, and acquire knowledge about Lean and Six Sigma initiatives in manufacturing/service operations. Prerequisites: OPRE 3310. (3-0) Y

OPRE 4320 Integrated SCM Information Systems (3 semester hours) An introduction to the concept of an integrated supply chain management system such as SAP's Enterprise Resource Planning System. Students will: 1) learn the elements of an ERP application, 2) understand the concepts of end-to-end supply chain management, 3) define the basic master data needed to create a supply chain plan, 4) forecast demand using several statistical methods, 5) plan inventories using MRP and re-order point techniques, 6) execute the supply chain plan through the production process, 7) view the completed inventories after production. Prerequisite: MIS 3300. (3-0) Y

OPRE 4330 Logistics and Inventory Management (3 semester hours) This course introduces and explains the logistics concepts and systems as well as the related components and managing the inventory in supply chain systems. It also covers the planning, designing and the techniques for managing the distribution of products and services. Prerequisite: OPRE 3310. (3-0) Y

OPRE 4340 Purchasing and Sourcing Management (3 semester hours) This course introduces and explains the purchasing and sourcing management concepts with focus on selecting, building and managing supplier relationships. It also covers the contract development and its management as well as building the necessary skills for effective negotiation. Prerequisites: OPRE 3310 and (MATH 1326 or MATH 2414 or MATH 2419). (3-0) Y

OPRE 4350 Global Outsourcing Services (3 semester hours) This course is an introduction to outsourcing of services. Students will learn how organizations initiate, engage and manage their global outsourcing of businesses or IT functions and services. The course covers topics related to the outsourcing lifecycle, selective vs. total outsourcing processes, strategies, models and related business implications. Prerequisite: OPRE 3310. (3-0) R

OPRE 4360 Capstone Projects in Supply Chain Management (3 semester hours) Capstone projects are sponsored by local supply chain companies. The course provides students with a unique opportunity to work in a team environment, interact with industry leaders and gain some industry specific knowledge. Students will learn how to work on a consulting engagement, how to collect the necessary data for analysis and assessment and how to use the skills and knowledge gained to solve real world problems in the area of supply chain management. Prerequisites: OPRE 3310 and instructor's consent required. (3-0) R

OPRE 4v81 Individual Study in Supply Chain Management (1-3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

OPRE 4v90 Management Internship (1-3 semester hours) This course is designed to further develop a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Students are required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives (goals) at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester students must prepare an oral presentation, reflecting on the knowledge gained in the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Credit/No Credit. ([1-3]-0) S

OPRE 4v91 Seminar Series in Supply Chain Management (1-3 semester hours) Discussion of selected topics and theories in the decision sciences. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

Real Estate

REAL 3305 Real Estate Principles (3 semester hours) Survey of various aspects of the real estate business and economics, including marketing, finance, taxation, investment, development, law, appraisal, and valuation. (Same as FIN 3305) (3-0) S

REAL 3365 Real Estate Finance and Advanced Principles (3 semester hours) Survey of the institutions in real estate finance and factors affecting the flow of funds; investment analysis and procedures involved in real estate financing. Prerequisite: FIN 3320. (Same as FIN 3365) (3-0) S

REAL 4321 Real Estate Law and Contracts (3 semester hours) Study of the legal principles governing real estate transactions. Topics include contract law, estates in land, forms of ownership, deeds, mortgages, title insurance, agency and homestead. Prerequisite or corequisite: REAL 3305 or FIN 3305. (Same as FIN 4321) (3-0) Y

REAL 4328 Real Estate Valuation (3 semester hours) This capstone real estate course provides the theory and methods of residential and income property valuation and appraisal. Topics include the three major approaches to appraising real estate, regression analysis, real estate market analysis, highest and best use analysis and capitalization techniques. Income property valuation techniques are emphasized. Several cases and problems are presented and solved. Prerequisites: ((REAL 3305 or FIN 3305) or (REAL 3365 or FIN 3365)) and FIN 3320. (Same as FIN 4328) (3-0) Y

REAL 4365 Real Estate Accounting, Taxation and Legal Concepts (3 semester hours) This course provides a review of accounting, tax and legal issues affecting the real estate industry. Material includes special rules used by owners and developers of real estate. May not be used to satisfy degree requirements for majors in accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 3320 or ACCT 3331. (Same as ACCT 4365) (3-0) R

REAL 4v80 Internship in Real Estate (1-3 semester hours) This course provides students with an opportunity to expand and apply their skills in a professional setting. Students must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. This course requires faculty sponsor approval, a written report upon completion and employer evaluation. In addition, this course is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis, but it can be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 hours. ([1-3]-0) R

REAL 4v90 Individual Study in Real Estate (1-3 semester hours) For students interested in pursuing further study of a topic in real estate. This course requires faculty sponsor approval and completion of REAL 3365 or REAL 4365. This course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 3 hours. ([1-3]-0) R

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