UT Dallas 2013 Undergraduate Catalog

American Studies

AMS 2311 Social Change and Photography in America (3 semester hours) This course exposes students to a broad range of images from the tradition of American documentary photography in order to help them better understand the role that such images play in social change. After briefly familiarizing ourselves with the history of photography and photographic methods, we will trace the history of documentary photography in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. (Same as GST 2311) (3-0) R

AMS 2312 Social and Political Legacies of the 1960s (3 semester hours) This course examines the social and political movements of the 1960s and links those activities to more recent debates regarding various forms of political thought and action in American society. We will follow the history of the sixties in order to enhance our understanding of the people, events, and places that not only defined this decade but which have also impacted American society in subsequent decades. Course readings and lectures will be supplemented by a wide range of media including songs, commercials, print advertisements, movies, and documentary footage. (Same as GST 2312) (3-0) R

AMS 2341 American Studies for the Twenty-First Century (3 semester hours) An introduction to American cultural studies, its theories, and methodologies. Topics may include: religion and politics; transnationalism; gender and sexuality; class, labor and consumption; race and ethnicity. The course develops students' abilities to interpret cultural texts, to make and evaluate historical and literary arguments, and to situate contemporary cultural debates in larger historical and theoretical frames. (3-0) Y

AMS 2390 Topics in American Studies (3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). (3-0) R

AMS 3300 American Popular Culture (3 semester hours) Examines American culture historically through some of its most popular cultural forms: fiction, film, magazines, advertising, music, sports, television and media. Considers the economics of cultural production, ways of critically reading popular texts, and how consumers make use of popular culture. Pays particular attention to the ways gender, race, and class influence how popular texts are created and consumed. (3-0) Y

AMS 3302 American Cultures (3 semester hours) Study of contemporary American cultures. The course examines institutions, culture regions, and the interaction between mainstream American culture and various subcultures. (3-0) Y

AMS 3313 Public Relations (3 semester hours) Study of the techniques used by U.S. corporations, nonprofit organizations, and individuals to create and foster the public images they desire. (3-0) Y

AMS 3314 Public Communication (3 semester hours) Study of communication theory in relation to ways in which the U.S. government and other institutions present themselves. (3-0) Y

AMS 3316 Interpersonal Communication (3 semester hours) Study of theory and practice of interpersonal communication. The focus will be on learning and applying various concepts and skills needed to improve the quality and effectiveness of communication in both personal and professional aspects of life. (3-0) Y

AMS 3321 American Ethnic Experience: Immigrants Before 1945 (3 semester hours) Study of the experiences, conditions, and contributions of the old immigrants who came to America before 1945. The course examines the making of mainstream American culture, persistence of ethnic subcultures, and changes in ethnic relations. (3-0) R

AMS 3322 American Ethnic Experience: Immigrants After 1945 (3 semester hours) Study of the experiences, conditions, and contributions of the new immigrants who have arrived in America since 1945. Topics include the changes in immigration policies, new patterns of ethnic relations, and impact of new immigrants on American society. (3-0) T

AMS 3326 The U.S. in the 21st Century (3 semester hours) An exploration of 21st-century conditions and realities of the U.S., including economic crisis and sociocultural changes. The course also examines the roles of the U.S. in the world community. (3-0) T

AMS 3350 Crisis Communication (3 semester hours) An introduction to the concepts, terms, strategies, and foundations of communication prior to, during and after a crisis. This course looks beyond the basic elements of communication into how a crisis changes elements of communication. (3-0) R

AMS 3374 Entrepreneurs in America (3 semester hours) An interdisciplinary introduction to various kinds of entrepreneurial ventures. The basic purpose of the course is to discover and understand the factors that govern the success (or failure) of entrepreneurial ventures and the role of the entrepreneur in a capitalist economy. (3-0) R

AMS 4300 Oral and Written Communication for the Classroom (3 semester hours) This course provides future teachers with the ability to understand, use, and teach standard American English grammar rules and to employ effective speaking techniques as well as write efficacious sentences, paragraphs, and essays and make effective oral presentations. By becoming proficient in these areas, future teachers will know how to score student essays and deliver viable classroom instruction. (3-0) S

AMS 4304 Communication in America (3 semester hours) This course examines the basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication in American society. Perspectives to be addressed include communication across cultures, gender differences in communication, interpersonal communication styles, and communication in peer groups, families, and work contexts. In addition, the effects of technology on communication and its impact on individuals and society will be explored. (3-0) T

AMS 4305 World History for Teachers (3 semester hours) This course is a comprehensive thematic survey of world history that parallels the standards in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as required for teachers in grades 8 through 12. (3-0) S

AMS 4360 Rebels and Reformers: Women and Alcohol in America (3 semester hours) This course examines women's historical role as crusaders against alcohol and identifies how the role of reformer was gendered. Identifies the genesis of the disease concept of alcoholism and how it was applied to men and women in different ways. This course also examines gendered ideas about male and female drinking and how they are represented in popular culture, literature, and film. (Same as GST 4360) (3-0) R

AMS 4379 Topics in American Studies (3 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). (3-0) Y

AMS 4381 Senior Honors in American Studies (3 semester hours) Required for graduation magna cum laude or summa cum laude. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 39 and no more than 45 hours of work towards a degree in American Studies and instructor consent required. (3-0) R

AMS 4385 Professional Communications in Business (3 semester hours) Combines theory and practice in improving both the written and spoken word in business. Students learn to evaluate professional and technical audiences and how to communicate more effectively to those audiences. Principles of composition, organization, tone, format, and punctuation are reviewed. Exercises in effective speaking and group presentations are also conducted. (3-0) T

AMS 4v80 Independent Study (1-6 semester hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

Interdisciplinary Studies - Bachelors

BIS 1100 Interdisciplinary Studies Freshman Seminar (1 semester hour) This course is designed to introduce students to the programs offered through the School of Interdisciplinary Studies and to assist students adjust to university life. Corequisite: UNIV 1010. (1-0) Y

BIS 2v90 Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R

BIS 3150 Jumpstart Seminar I (1 semester hour) This one hour seminar is an adjunct to a service learning program, Jumpstart, which involves 6-12 hours/week supervised work in a preschool classroom. This course is restricted to students who participate in the Jumpstart program. The seminar provides training for activities that students will lead in their preschool classrooms, and background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language and social development. Jumpstart Corps members have the unique opportunity to inspire young children to learn, serve in a local community, work on a team, and build professional skills. All Corps members receive professional-caliber training to help them implement Jumpstart's outcome-based program, promote children's school success, and build family involvement. Instructor consent required. (1-0) S

BIS 3190 Library Research Skills (1 semester hour) Through this online course, students will develop the skills to identify what information is needed for their research, how to find and evaluate scholarly resources, and how to organize the information for a paper or other course project. Plagiarism, copyright, and citation management will be included. (1-0) R

BIS 3250 Jumpstart Seminar II (2 semester hours) This internship seminar is an adjunct to a service learning program, Jumpstart, which involves 6-12 hours/week of supervised work in a preschool classroom. This course is restricted to students who participate in the Jumpstart program. The seminar will help students understand the role that the Jumpstart program has on citizenship. Topics covered in this seminar will deal with the following: The Working Poor, Defining Jumpstart Service, Leadership and Civic engagement, and Jumpstart as a Social Change Agent. Students are required to attend training and service events throughout the semester. Instructor consent required. (2-0) S

BIS 3310 Environmental Studies Project (3 semester hours) This course is designed to provide students with a new learning experience in environmental issues. This may be at a faculty-supervised work situation in business, government, or other approved setting. Sites may be local, out of state, or abroad. The internship option provides exposure to a professional working environment, application of theory to working realities, and an opportunity to test skills and clarify goals in environmental studies. Experience gained may also serve as a work credential after graduation. Course requirements include writing a journal and research paper connecting theory to practice. Students may also choose a straight research option to meet the requirements of this course but instructor consent must be obtained before any work is undertaken. (3-0) Y

BIS 3320 The Nature of Intellectual Inquiry (3 semester hours) Core course designed to enhance the student's critical thinking and reasoning in order to understand and utilize the methodologies of scholarly pursuits. To be taken during the student's first twelve hours as a junior in the Interdisciplinary Studies program. (There is a honors section of this course for those interested in honors in the major). May not be taken on a credit/no credit basis. (3-0) S

BIS 3v03 Educational Issues (1-6 semester hours) This course is designed to allow students to study and analyze various educational issues under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students must have the prior approval from the faculty member willing to supervise the course and the permission of the Associate Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R

BIS 4303 Senior Honors in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 semester hours) Required for graduation magna cum laude and summa cum laude. See requirements for Graduation with Latin Honors in this catalog. Consent of the instructor and Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Studies is required. (3-0) S

BIS 4305 Learning Studies Practicum (3 semester hours) Supervised instructional experiences with school-age students. Focus is on enrichment activities that meet the learning needs of individual students. Consent of faculty member is required. (3-0) Y

BIS 4306 Strategies for Diversity in Education (3 semester hours) This course prepares teacher certification candidates to meet the challenges of student diversity in the general education classroom. Students will examine the roles of various professionals, overview the identification and needs of special education and gifted and talented students through the lenses of gender, ethnicity, culture and language. Students will learn about IEPs, ARDs, legal requirements, collaboration, instructional differentiation, cooperative learning, inclusion, and assessment techniques applicable for diverse learners in the general education classroom. (3-0) S

BIS 4310 Co-op Education (3 semester hours) Students completing this course will integrate academic learning with their co-op work experience. To attain this goal, students will keep a journal of their workplace experience, maintain contact with the instructor, and prepare a written report that focuses on the accomplishments and insights gained through their co-op experience. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). (3-0) T

BIS 4v01 Special Topics (1-3 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) R

BIS 4v02 Independent Study (1-9 semester hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. An independent study course may be used in the Interdisciplinary Studies degree plan wherever appropriate. An independent study course involves an individual contract between the student and a faculty member, specifying what requirements the student will meet. This usually involves some combination of reading, research, papers, examinations, and meetings with the faculty member. To undertake an independent study, the student must arrange with an appropriate faculty member for supervision of a particular topic. For written papers, 10 pages are required for each hour of credit. Consent of the faculty member is required. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). ([1-9]-0) S

BIS 4v04 Internship (1-6 semester hours) Students undertake a new learning experience at a faculty-supervised work situation in business, government, or social service agency, arts institution, or other setting appropriate to the student's concentration. Sites may be local, out of state, or abroad. An internship provides exposure to a professional working environment, application of theory to working realities, and an opportunity to test skills and clarify goals in a specific field. Experience gained may also serve as a work credential after graduation. Course requirements include writing a journal and research paper connecting theory to practice. This course is open to all majors at UTD. The internships must be approved by the instructor before commencing the internship. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) S

Education

ED 3314 The American Public School (3 semester hours) A study of the nature, scope, and purposes of the public school, with emphasis on meeting the needs of the multicultural society of Texas. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Completion of 45 hours of course work and a cumulative GPA of 2.500 is a prerequisite for this course. (3-0) S

ED 3315 Children's Literature (3 semester hours) Examining literature that is age appropriate for elementary students. Literature from many cultures and writers will be included. Students will explore ways to incorporate a variety of literature in their classes and the national and state standards will be incorporated into the class. Prerequisite: HUMA 1301 or equivalent. (Same as LIT 3315) (3-0) S

ED 3339 Educational Psychology for Teachers (3 semester hours) This course will introduce the theoretical foundation underlying various teaching strategies and provide a framework for understanding student development. Emphasis will be on application of theories in actual teacher behavior. (3-0) S

ED 3340 Math Concepts for Teachers (3 semester hours) Class designed to teach prospective classroom teachers to analyze problem situations, create solution strategies, solve problems, and justify his/her thinking; students will construct concepts of number, patterns, geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics through the use of exploration and investigation. Prerequisite: MATH 1306 or MATH 1314. (3-0) S

ED 3342 Classroom Management Grades EC - 6 (3 semester hours) Principles of teaching, classroom management and organization, and designing instruction and assessment for elementary/middle schools. Emphasis will be given to understanding the teaching environment, understanding learners, and enhancing student achievement. The domains and competencies for the Professional Development TExES are examined. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 3345 Art, Music, and Physical Development Grades EC - 6 (3 semester hours) Principles and foundations for developing critical thinking and motor skills through art, music, and organized movement. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 3370 Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics and Computer Science (3 semester hours) Curriculum design and methods of instruction in the mathematical sciences. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 3371 Curriculum and Instruction in the Natural Sciences (3 semester hours) Curriculum design and methods of instruction in the natural sciences. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 3380 Curriculum and Instruction in English (3 semester hours) Curriculum design and methods of instruction in English. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 3382 Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies (3 semester hours) Curriculum design and methods of instruction in history. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience is required and a prerequisite for a grade in this course. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4343 Science Methods for Grades EC - 6 (3 semester hours) Subject matter and scope and sequence organization for an integrated science program in the elementary/middle school based on national and Texas curricula and assessment standards. Hands-on activities are included. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4344 Mathematics Methods for Elementary Teachers (3 semester hours) Subject matter and scope and sequence organization for teaching mathematics in the elementary/middle school, based on national and Texas curricula and assessment standards. Manipulatives and visuals are used to help students master basic mathematics principles and develop critical thinking skills. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4345 Social Studies Methods for Grades EC - 6 (3 semester hours) Subject matter and scope and sequence organization for teaching social studies in the elementary/middle school, based on national and Texas curricula and assessment standards. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4352 Reading I: Learning to Read (3 semester hours) A study of the reading process and theories about teaching reading, understanding the sequential development of reading programs and methods for grouping students and subject matter. This course is required for all students seeking Generalist EC-6 or ELAR 4-8 certification. (3-0) S

ED 4353 Reading in Secondary Content (3 semester hours) Focuses on using reading and writing in non-language related courses. Required for students seeking certification for Grades 4-8 Generalist and all Grades 8-12 content teaching fields. (3-0) S

ED 4357 Diagnostic Reading (3 semester hours) Examines a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the classroom teacher - both formal and informal procedures are introduced. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. Prerequisites: ED 4352 and ED 4363 and must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. (3-0) S

ED 4358 Chess I: Using Chess in Elementary Schools (3 semester hours) Using chess to teach critical thinking, math, and reading skills in the elementary and secondary classrooms. This course is also appropriate for chess instructors who wish to incorporate additional academic and humanistic goals into their programs. No previous knowledge of chess is required. This course is offered through the UTD's eLearning. (3-0) R

ED 4359 Chess II: Institutional and Cultural Contexts of Chess (3 semester hours) Examination of the role of chess in history and in contemporary culture and analysis of chess in education. Each student's culminating paper proposes improving an existing chess program or developing a new chess program. No prior knowledge of chess is required. This course is offered through the UTD's eLearning. (3-0) R

ED 4361 Classroom Management Grades 8 - 12 (3 semester hours) A systematic approach to managing the total classroom environment. Emphasis will be given to practical applications of the research in instructional design, instructional management, and strategies in behavioral management. The domains and competencies for the Pedagogy and Professional Development TExES are examined. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4362 Classroom Management Grades 4 - 8 (3 semester hours) A systematic approach to managing the total classroom environment in the middle school. Emphasis will be given to practical applications of the research in instructional design, instructional management, and strategies in behavioral management for pre- and early teens. The domains and competencies for the Pedagogy and Professional Development TExES are examined. Class includes 20 hours of field experience for 4-8 Generalist students. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4363 Reading II/ELAR Methods (3 semester hours) Focuses on developing and learning methods to teach reading, writing, listening, language arts, speaking and thinking for Grades EC-6. Instructional strategies, thematic teaching, study skills, and effective uses for text, media, and other resources will be utilized. This course is required for all students seeking Generalist EC-6 certification. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. Prerequisite: ED 4352. (3-0) S

ED 4370 Multicultural Perspectives in Learning (3 semester hours) Focuses on identifying and effectively meeting the needs of a diverse population. Emphasis is placed on tools for planning, collaborative decision making, and implementation of new ideas in the development of programs for minority and non-minority students in academic achievement. (3-0) R

ED 4372 Educational Technology (3 semester hours) Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to support the teaching and learning process. This class is only available online. Information about specific instructional applications is presented to provide concrete examples of principles and procedures. Focuses on electronic instructional media, multimedia, telecommunications, multi-user networks, and their real world applications to the secondary classroom. Must be officially admitted to teacher certification program. Department permission required. Must register in Teacher Development Center. (3-0) S

ED 4693 Student Teaching - Elementary (6 semester hours) Observation and supervised teaching in the elementary school. Requires full-time attendance in schools for 12 weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching. Must register in Teacher Development Center. Additional fee attached to course. (6-0) S

ED 4694 Student Teaching - Grades 8 - 12 (6 semester hours) Observation and supervised teaching in a single teaching field. Requires full time attendance in schools for 12 weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching. Must register in Teacher Development Center. Additional fee attached to course. (6-0) S

ED 4696 Student Teaching - Grades 4 - 8 (6 semester hours) Observation and supervised teaching in a classroom for Grades 4-8. Requires full-time attendance in school for 12 weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching. Must register in Teacher Development Center. Additional fee attached to course. (6-0) S

ED 4v90 Independent Study in Education (1-6 semester hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

ED 4v95 Special Topics in Education (1-6 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit (9 hours maximum). Department permission required. ([1-6]-0) R

Gender Studies

GST 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 semester hours) An introduction to the way gender shapes individuals, social institutions and culture. Examines gender, class, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and nationality as interactive systems. Topics include biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the cultural construction of gender; the psychology of sex roles; the ways gender shapes families, workplaces and other social institutions. (Same as SOC 2300) (3-0) Y

GST 2311 Social Change and Photography in America (3 semester hours) This course exposes students to a broad range of images from the tradition of American documentary photography in order to help them better understand the role that such images play in social change. After briefly familiarizing ourselves with the history of photography and photographic methods, we will trace the history of documentary photography in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. (Same as AMS 2311) (3-0) R

GST 2312 Social and Political Legacies of the 1960s (3 semester hours) This course examines the social and political movements of the 1960s and links those activities to more recent debates regarding various forms of political thought and action in American society. We will follow the history of the sixties in order to enhance our understanding of the people, events, and places that not only defined this decade but which have also impacted American society in subsequent decades. Course readings and lectures will be supplemented by a wide range of media including songs, commercials, print advertisements, movies, and documentary footage. (Same as AMS 2312) (3-0) R

GST 2v90 Topics in Gender Studies (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R

GST 3301 Psychology of Gender (3 semester hours) Examines gender as it is expressed in the personality of the individual and in the social relations of dyads and groups. Topics include gender identity, sexual orientation, gender differences in intellectual abilities and personality characteristics, gender as it is expressed in friendships, marriage, and sexuality, and cultural gender stereotypes as they affect individual psychology and personal relationships. (Same as PSY 3324) (3-0) Y

GST 3302 Gender in Western Thought (3 semester hours) Identifies gendered approaches within the history of ideas, including philosophy, theology, and literature. Universal truths about human nature, particularly with regard to sex and gender, are located within the intellectual milieu of various writers and within the larger body of Western thought. (Same as HIST 3302) (3-0) T

GST 3303 Gender, Society and Politics (3 semester hours) Addresses the influence of gender on the distribution of public goods and the way gender, interacting with race and class, shapes social, political, and economic institutions. Introduces students to traditional notions of rights and citizenship as conceptual underpinnings for contemporary political and legal debates (on welfare, reproductive rights, childcare, job segregation, women in the military, prostitution). (Same as SOC 3354) (3-0) Y

GST 4311 Gender and Education (3 semester hours) An examination of the impact of gender, race, and class on the educational experiences of men and women. Considers the way educational institutions both empower individuals and reproduce social inequalities based on class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality. Topics include Enlightenment discussions of gender and reason, co-ed vs. single sex education, curriculum transformation efforts to include the history and experiences of women and ethnic minorities, feminist and critical pedagogies. (3-0) Y

GST 4325 Motherhood and the Technological Womb (3 semester hours) Examines the relationship between reproductive technologies and the meanings of motherhood. Investigates the history of reproductive technologies and how various interventions and medical/technological "advances" have influenced the social, emotional, legal, political, and economic dimensions of motherhood and reproduction. Topics include conception and birth control, "test tube" babies, infertility treatments, surrogacy, fetal ultrasound imaging, high-order multiple births, genetic testing, cloning, and ectogenesis (artificial wombs). (3-0) R

GST 4360 Rebels and Reformers: Women and Alcohol in America (3 semester hours) This course examines women's historical role as crusaders against alcohol and identifies how the role of reformer was gendered. Identifies the genesis of the disease concept of alcoholism and how it was applied to men and women in different ways. This course also examines gendered ideas about male and female drinking and how they are represented in popular culture, literature, and film. (Same as AMS 4360) (3-0) R

GST 4379 Topics in Gender Studies (3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). (3-0) R

GST 4380 Women, Work and Family (3 semester hours) An examination of the relationship between women's work for pay in the marketplace and their unpaid work in homes across time and in different cultures. Topics include historical separation of work from home under capitalism; division of household labor between men and women; public policy initiatives (socialized/commercial housework and daycare, family leave, telecommuting, part-time and flex-time work) designed to make juggling work and family easier; the ways class, race, and ethnicity constrain and enable women's choices. (Same as SOC 4380) (3-0) R

GST 4381 Senior Honors Research (3 semester hours) Designed for students conducting original research. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

GST 4382 Senior Honors in Gender Studies (3 semester hours) To qualify for magna or summa cum laude if the required number of hours are taken at UTD. A suitable ranking of this paper/project is required to qualify for honors. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

GST 4v80 Independent Study (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

Health Care Studies

HLTH 1100 Career Explorations for the Health Professions (1 semester hour) Centered on guest speakers, this one hour course aims to develop a holistic approach for healthcare and to explore the realities of various health professions. Students will investigate many options for present and next-generation health careers, and learn what courses and activities will open doors to their areas of interest. Appropriate for any level student. Instructor's permission is required to register for this course. (1-0) Y

HLTH 1301 Introduction to Kinesiology (3 semester hours) The history, principles, objectives and current concepts of kinesiology. May not be repeated for credit. (3 hours maximum) (3-0) R

HLTH 1322 Human Nutrition (3 semester hours) This is an introduction to human nutrition. Topics will include classes, sources, and function of nutrients, digestion and absorption, and metabolism with applications to normal and therapeutic nutritional needs. (3-0) Y

HLTH 3101 Medical Terminology (1 semester hour) This course is an introduction to the origins and basics of medical terminology. This course examines basic word structure including suffixes and prefixes, the organization of the human body, the definition of useful diagnostic and procedural terminology, and commonly used medical abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols. (1-0) Y

HLTH 3300 Pre-Health Professional Development (3 semester hours) This course will introduce students to the concept of professionalism within a healthcare context including issues of appropriate personal attributes and expectations, ethical decision making, interpersonal communication, and self-appraisal. It will also have an overview of the history of medicine in the U.S., and examination of current issues in healthcare and discussions about personal enrichment through research, clinical activities, and study abroad experiences. Prerequisites: Must be at least a sophomore and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

HLTH 3301 Issues in Geriatric Healthcare (3 semester hours) This course will explore the health, social, psychological, economic and family issues that impact the health status of older adults. An overview of the healthcare system, hospice, home health care professionals, and productive aging will be presented. Students considering careers in the health care field will learn about the multiple factors that must be considered when working with this complex patient population. (3-0) R

HLTH 3305 The U.S. Healthcare System (3 semester hours) This course examines the structure and components of the U.S. healthcare system including hospitals, long-term care, home health and hospice and an analysis of the roles and interconnections among these components. Students will also receive an overview of payment sources and referral systems as well as an exploration of the roles of healthcare professionals in various healthcare settings. (3-0) Y

HLTH 3310 Health Care Issues: Global Perspectives (3 semester hours) This course examines the social and political aspects of global healthcare issues. Stressing principles of cultural competence, we will examine varying meanings of "health" as well as the range of factors that encourage the health of some and deny it for others. Through a combination of "macro-level" (national and international) as well as "micro-level" (local) analysis, we will enhance our understanding of the global dimensions of health and disease, various strategies of health initiatives, and the short-and-long-term outcomes of both diseases and correlating health care interventions. Topics may include: maternal mortality, HIV, health and environmental hazards, health systems, health and human rights, grass roots initiatives, the millennium development goals, chronic disease and female genital surgeries. (3-0) R

HLTH 3315 Issues in Patient Education (3 semester hours) Overview of methods of delivery of patient education, factors impacting patient education, instructional strategies, health attitudes as they affect patient education and prevention, and the role of patient education within the health care system. May not be repeated for credit. (3 hours maximum) (3-0) R

HLTH 4108 Verbal Reasoning and Writing for Pre-Health (1 semester hour) This course develops professional level text analysis and composition skills critical to lifelong success in the health professions. Students analyze connotation, content and rhetorical structure, evaluate relationships, and authorial perspective, and craft short compositions. Students will also develop the critical thinking and methodological skills necessary for success on the MCAT and similar exams, success in professional school and success in the health professions. (1-0) R

HLTH 4304 Health Professions Internship (3 semester hours) The internship provides students with exposure to a professional healthcare environment, interaction with a variety of disciplines, application of theory to practice and the opportunity to clarify career goals. The learning experience is faculty supervised and requires journal documentation and a research paper. The internship must be approved by the instructor before commencing the internship. Instructor's permission is required to register for the class. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). (3-0) S

HLTH 4380 Special Topics in Healthcare (3 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum). Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor or associate dean's consent required. (3-0) R

HLTH 4v01 Health Professions Independent Study (1-6 semester hours) Independent study under a faculty member's direction. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum.) Instructor's consent required. ([1-6]-0) R

Interdisciplinary Studies

ISIS 3305 Humans: Our Place in Nature (3 semester hours) The history of the human lineage is a complicated but fascinating combination of biological and cultural changes. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3306 Human Female: Biology and Culture (3 semester hours) This course takes a life cycle approach to the major biological events in a woman's life, and the various cultural observances or lack thereof, which accompany these changes. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3308 Bones, Bodies, and Disease (3 semester hours) An introduction to the wealth of knowledge that can be ascertained through an analysis of skeletal and mummified remains. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3309 Dental Anthropology (3 semester hours) An introduction to the wealth of knowledge that can be ascertained through analysis of the dentition of archaeological and modern populations. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3310 Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Multidisciplinary Investigation (3 semester hours) Examines childhood sexual abuse in America using multiple cultural forms: psychiatry, fiction, drama, film, news stories, and television. Considers how the definitions of sexual abuse evolve and change from the late 1800s to the 21st century. (3-0) R

ISIS 3312 Women in Management (3 semester hours) Earnings differences, employment policies, and other critical issues affecting the status of women in managerial and professional positions. (3-0) S

ISIS 3315 The Politics of Reproduction: U.S. and Global Contexts (3 semester hours) This course assesses the ways in which reproduction and access to reproductive healthcare services are influenced by myriad factors including gender, age, marital status, race/ethnicity, geography and ability, among others. Grounding our discussion in broader discourses of equality, human rights, citizenship, and non-discrimination, we will explore human reproduction as an inherently charged political domain, one that has been and continues to be shaped at the intersection of political, medical/scientific, ethical and religious ideologies. Compares the political dimensions of reproduction in both the industrialized and developing nations. (3-0) R

ISIS 3335 United States and East Asia (3 semester hours) This course examines the interaction between the United States and East Asia. Topics include sociocultural differences, conflicts in political ideals, economic relations, and trans-Pacific diplomacy. The course highlights the spread of American culture and the rise of East Asia's economic power. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3338 Native American Cultures (3 semester hours) This course provides an overview of Native American cultures (Indian, Eskimo/Inuit, and Aleut) from the first contacts with the European world to the present. Native American cultures will be viewed from an interdisciplinary and culture area perspective. Topics discussed include Native American ideologies and issues. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3350 World Archaeology (3 semester hours) A look at archaeology from a global perspective. This course will include theory, methods, and analytical techniques used to reconstruct past cultures. (3-0) Y

ISIS 3390 Costa Rica Field Trip (3 semester hours) Costa Rica is world famous for its dedication to the concept of sustainability. This field trip class will visit different locations in Costa Rica to better understand the diversity of its environment, its non-human primates, its practices that help sustainability and related ecological and social issues. The emphasis on particular aspects of the course may vary from year to year but the major emphasis is sustainability. This course has a service learning component. Student must be in good academic standing. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ISIS 3v70 Teaching Internship (1-3 semester hours) Students work individually with faculty members in preparing and presenting course materials and tutoring students. Instructor and Associate Dean's consent required. Taken on a credit/no credit basis. Can be repeated (6 maximum hours). Must have completed the relevant course with a grade of at least B and have a UT Dallas GPA of at least 3.000. ([1-3]-0) S

ISIS 4303 Business, Law and Culture (3 semester hours) Study of the interactions among business, law and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course examines business tangles, legal complexities, ethical dilemmas, and cultural contradictions in the capitalist system. (3-0) T

ISIS 4309 Diversity and Globalization (3 semester hours) This course studies the meanings, processes, and impacts of globalization. It highlights sensitivity to global diversity and examines how global companies cope with a wide array of political/legal forces and transform social/cultural differences into competitive advantages. Topics include conflict resolution in business diplomacy and strategies of managing global diversity. (3-0) Y

ISIS 4350 International Development: Cultural Impacts (3 semester hours) This interdisciplinary course explores the social, political and economic factors that shape international development. Central course themes include the history of international development, poverty and economics, education, sustainability and the environment. (3-0) R

ISIS 4v89 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (1-6 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit (6 hours maximum). ([1-6]-0) R

Physical Instruction

PHIN 1100 Sports Conditioning (1 semester hour) This course will emphasize cardio pulmonary endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, speed, agility, quickness, and balance. A variety of activities, drills, and sports specific techniques will be included. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 1102 Racquetball (1 semester hour) Emphasis on acquiring enjoyment, knowledge, and skills in racquetball. Instruction will vary according to individual ability. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) S

PHIN 1103 Beginning Tennis (1 semester hour) Designed for the beginning player; development of basic strokes, rules of play, scoring. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1104 Intermediate Tennis (1 semester hour) Designed for the player who has mastered the basic skills; utilization of strategy and tactics in game playing. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1106 Aerobics (1 semester hour) Emphasis on the development of cardiovascular endurance by utilizing choreographed routines which may combine basic dance pattern with activities such as walking, jogging, and jumping. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) S

PHIN 1107 Beginning Basketball (1 semester hour) Instruction in basic basketball skills, including rules, strategies, and competitive activities. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1108 Beginning Volleyball (1 semester hour) Instruction in basic volleyball skills, including rules, strategies, and competitive activities. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1111 Special Topics in Physical Instruction (1 semester hour) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 1120 Yoga (1 semester hour) Instruction in the basic asanas and their use in building and maintaining muscle tone throughout the body. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1121 Martial Arts and Self-Defense (1 semester hour) Instruction in basic self-defense techniques. Emphasis on judo and karate for self-defense and physical exercise. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 1122 Physical Fitness and Conditioning (1 semester hour) Instruction and participation in weight training and conditioning techniques. Designed to improve muscle tone, flexibility, and endurance. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) S

PHIN 1129 Beginning Swimming (1 semester hour) Instruction in basic swimming including stroke development, water safety, and fitness. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 1130 Intermediate Swimming (1 semester hour) Instruction in advanced swimming including stroke development, water safety, and fitness. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) S

PHIN 2102 Racquetball II (1 semester hour) This course will emphasize the continued development and increase in skills necessary for the game of racquetball. Skill development will continue in strokes, serving, court position, rules and strategies. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 2120 Open Water Scuba (1 semester hour) Learn to Scuba dive under the PADI diver-training program. This is a hands-on course that will teach you in a classroom and pool environment all of the skills to receive diver certification. At the end of the course, you will demonstrate your skills at a Scuba Park near Dallas. Upon successful completion of four open water dives, you will receive a PADI Open Water Certification card. Prerequisites: You must be able to swim and tread water. Additionally, you must complete a medical questionnaire. Depending on the response to the questionnaire, you might need a medical release from a Licensed Medical Doctor prior to any in-water training. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 2125 Intermediate Yoga (1 semester hour) This yoga course offers a more in-depth practice of yoga postures emphasizing inversions, back bends, and breath work as well as essential techniques and information about yoga. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 2150 Soccer (1 semester hour) This course will teach understanding and demonstration of the basic skills and concepts used in the game of soccer. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) Y

PHIN 2151 Topics in Athletics (1 semester hour) Skill instruction in the basic fundamentals and style of playing. Emphasis on techniques, conditioning, and play patterns. Instructor consent required. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 2152 Baseball (1 semester hour) This course will teach understanding and demonstration of basic skills and concepts used in the game of baseball. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 2153 Cheerleading (1 semester hour) This course is designed to develop the theory and practice of cheerleading skills. It will provide aerobic exercise. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

PHIN 2154 Cross Country (1 semester hour) This course is designed to develop the skills necessary for cross-country. Warm-up techniques, endurance training and cool-down techniques will be learned. May be repeated for credit (3 hours maximum). (1-0) R

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