UT Dallas 2013 Graduate Catalog

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Graduate Programs in Public Policy and Political Economy

Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy and Political Economy

75 semester credit hours minimum beyond the baccalaureate degree

Faculty

Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Lloyd J. Dumas, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Murray J. Leaf, Richard K. Scotch

Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Simon M. Fass, Jennifer S. Holmes, Linda Camp Keith, Dohyeong Kim, Clint W. Peinhardt, Sheryl L. Skaggs

Assistant Professors: Jonas Bunte, Brandon J. Kinne

Mission

The mission of the PhD program in Public Policy and Political Economy is to prepare our students for professional positions in research, teaching, and practice in fields related to public policy and political economy, and in both academic and nonacademic settings. We prepare students through instruction in social science and public policy concepts, advanced methodological knowledge, applied social research techniques, and professional communication skills. PPPE students and faculty are encouraged to promote an inclusive and diverse environment that is committed to continued scholarship and service.

Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to apply social science and public policy theories and concepts.
  • Students will develop competency in advanced methods of social science and public policy research and analysis.
  • Students will develop basic skills in professional communication appropriate to the public policy and political economy research and analysis.
  • Facilities

    Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and University's Computer Labs. The School has two computing laboratories that have over 30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's Computer Labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    Admission Requirements

    The PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or college. An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.2, a score of 160 Verbal and a score of 148 Quantitative on the GRE, or equivalent score on the GMAT, are desirable. Students may also wish to consider submitting their score from the writing component of the GRE test as additional evidence of their writing skills. Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in economics, political science, sociology, calculus, statistics, and research design.

    Degree Requirements

    The PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy requires a minimum of 75 post-baccalaureate graduate semester credit hours. Full-time students can complete the degree in an average of 5 years.

    Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in their graduate courses in the degree program, and earn a grade of at least 3.0 (B) for all core courses. If placed on probation, students will have one semester to bring their cumulative grade point average to a 3.0 or greater. Any student who receives two Cs will not be allowed to continue in the program.

    Students must complete the following:

  • 33 semester credit hours of core courses
  • 12 semester credit hours of field courses (six semester credit hours in two fields of the student's choice)
  • Development
  • International Conflict and Security
  • International Political Economy
  • Social Policy
  • 6 semester credit hours area of specialization (in one of the fields of the student's choice)
  • A Methods Qualifying Examination in Quantitative Methods and Research Design
  • Matriculation to the dissertation phase
  • Successful completion of a dissertation
  • Successful completion of 75 semester credit hours including electives
  • The requirements are outlined in further detail below:

    I. Major Core Requirements (33 semester credit hours)

    Students complete a core sequence of courses as follows:

    1. Six semester credit hours of coursework in Government and Public Policy:

    POEC 6347 Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics
    POEC 6329 Ethics, Culture, and Public Policy

    2. Six semester credit hours of Theories of Political Economy

    POEC 6312 Social-Economic Theories
    or POEC 6301 Political-Economic Theories
    POEC 6321 Economics for Public Policy
    or POEC 7327 Innovation Dynamics and Economic Change

    3. Fifteen semester credit hours of Analytical Methods

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus-based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods
    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Students are strongly encouraged to take the calculus-based sequence, which is better preparation for the methods qualifying exam and more advanced methods courses.

    Students will also take at least three additional courses from a set of courses approved by the relevant graduate program committee. Students may obtain a list of those courses from the program office.

    4. Six semester credit hours of Research Design

    EPPS 6310 Research Design I
    EPPS 6342 Research Design II

    II. Field Courses (12 semester credit hours)

    Students take a two course introductory sequence in two of the following five fields. The fields and required courses are as follows:

    Development:

    POEC 6354 Theories and Issues of Development (Required)

    Select one of the following:

    POEC 6335 Institutions and Development
    POEC 6360 World Political Economy1
    POEC 6362 Political Development
    POEC 6364 Development Economics
    POEC 6368 Population and Development
    POEC 6392 Practice of International Development

    International Conflict and Security (Select two of the following):

    POEC 6361 Political Violence and Terrorism
    POEC 6369 National and International Security Strategies and Policies
    PSCI 6300 Proseminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations

    International Political Economy (Select two of the following):

    PSCI 6300 Proseminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations
    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy
    PSCI 6316 International Organizations
    POEC 6360 World Political Economy1

    Social Policy (Select two of the following):

    POEC 6351 Domestic Social Policy
    POEC 7341 Health Policy
    SOC 6350 Social Stratification

    Students may request that alternative courses be substituted in a particular field with the approval of the Program Head. Moreover, students may, in consultation with the Program Head, define a new field provided that appropriate coursework is available in a coherent research literature is identified.

    III. Area of Specialization (6 semester credit hours)

    The student takes at least six semester credit hours of additional coursework in one of the field areas as defined above. The specific required courses are designated by the faculty associated with that area of concentration and may be obtained from the program office. The student completes a dissertation in one of the two fields (see above) and must successfully defend the dissertation before a duly constituted dissertation committee, in accordance with the requirements of the University and the UT System.

    IV. Methods Qualifying Exam and Matriculation to the Dissertation Phase

    To advance to the dissertation stage of the program, students are evaluated by the Program Committee based on a Methods Qualifying Examination (MQE).

    The MQE will cover course material from EPPS 6313/EPPS 6316 and/or EPPS 7313/EPPS 7316, EPPS 6310 Research Design I and EPPS 6342 Research Design II. It is critical full-time students take EPPS 6313 or EPPS 7313 and EPPS 6310 the fall semester of the first year and EPPS 6316 or EPPS 7316 and EPPS 6342 in spring. The MQE is administered once a year in late April or May. Student performance will be evaluated as unsatisfactory, satisfactory or excellent. Those failing the exam will be given a second opportunity to pass, at the end of the summer. Those failing the MQE for the second time will not be allowed to continue in the program. Part-time students should seek to complete the required methods sequence by spring of their second year; courses noted above should be taken in the same basic sequence.

    V. Dissertation Seminar

    Students must register for POEC 8398 Dissertation Seminar for a minimum of one semester after passing the MQE and workshop paper requirements. The aim of the Dissertation Seminar is to assist students in the formulation of a dissertation topic, and prepare a dissertation topic for submission to a dissertation Committee and defense of the proposal before the committee. The Dissertation Seminar can also be taken as an independent study course under the supervision of the student's likely dissertation supervisor. Students seeking advising concerning a suitable dissertation topic or appropriate supervisor are encouraged to consult with the Program Head.

    VI. Electives

    Students take free electives in areas of interest to fulfill the 75-semester credit hour PhD requirement.

    PhD students should note that they are eligible to receive Master's degrees offered by the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences while they matriculate toward the doctorate. These degrees include the Master of Public Policy and the MS in International Political Economy. Other EPPS masters degrees can be earned as well. Students interested in obtaining one of these degrees should consult the catalog requirements or the graduate advisor.

    1. Students may only count POEC 6360 World Political Economy as a field course for either Development or International Political Economy, not for both.

    Master of Science in International Political Economy

    36 semester credit hours minimum

    Faculty

    Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Lloyd J. Dumas, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Murray J. Leaf, Richard K. Scotch

    Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Simon M. Fass, Jennifer S. Holmes, Linda Camp Keith, Dohyeong Kim, Clint W. Peinhardt

    Assistant Professors: Jonas Bunte, Brandon J. Kinne

    Mission

    The mission of the Master of Science in International Political Economy is to offer an experience in interdisciplinary education and policy research through activities in graduate education, scholarly and applied inquiry, and professional service. Today, more careers increasingly require international knowledge and skills that transcend the confines of traditional disciplinary training. We prepare students for careers in research, teaching, and practice in a variety of both academic and non-academic public policy and political economy settings. The Master of Science in International Political Economy will develop students' critical skill sets to meet the needs and demands of the international diplomatic and business sectors. These skills include critical thinking, knowledge of multiple cultures, and cultural contexts, rigorous research skills, and the ability to communicate effectively in an array of environments. Students will be prepared to advance careers in policy and data analysis, and administrative positions in government, the nonprofit and private sectors.

    Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to apply social science and international political economy theories and concepts.
  • Students will develop competency in advanced methods of social science and international political economy research and analysis.
  • Students will develop basic skills in professional communication appropriate to international political economy research and analysis.
  • Students will develop competency in analysis, evaluation, and research design relevant to social science and international political economy research and analysis.
  • Facilities

    Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's Computer Labs. The School has two computing laboratories that have over 30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS, and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's Computer Labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    Admissions Requirement

    The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2013/graduate/admission).

    The master's program in International Political Economy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or college. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 scale), and a verbal score of 156 and a quantitative score of 146 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, statistics, and research design. Students are strongly encouraged to strengthen their foreign language skills.

    Degree Requirements

    The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2013/graduate/policies/policy).

    Students seeking a Master of Science in International Political Economy must complete at least 36 semester credit hours of work in the program. The program has four components:

  • Eighteen semester credit hours of required coursework
  • Twelve semester credit hours of prescribed electives
  • Six semester credit hours of free electives
  • Students must demonstrate a foreign language proficiency equivalent to two years of university-level study in one foreign language before graduation.
  • Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in their graduate courses in the degree program, including core courses. If placed on probation, students will have one semester to bring their cumulative grade point average to a 3.0 or greater. Any student who receives two Cs will no longer be allowed to continue in the program.

    Major Required Courses: 18 semester credit hours

    All students should complete the core courses as soon as possible.

    Economic Theory Core (take one of the following):

    POEC 6321 Economics for Public Policy
    POEC 7327 Innovation Dynamics and Economic Change

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods
    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    One of the following:

    POEC 6360 World Political Economy
    POEC 6366 International Economics
    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

    One of the following:

    POEC 6335 Institutions and Development
    POEC 6362 Political Development
    PSCI 6309 International Political Economy
    PSCI 6316 International Organizations

    One of the following:

    POEC 7V76 Policy Research Workshop in Development Studies
    EPPS 6310 Research Design I
    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    Prescribed Electives

    Students complete 12 semester credit hours of Prescribed Electives. These consist of:

    An area concentration in which the student completes two courses (six semester credit hours) in history, advanced language, or area studies courses that address a single region, including Europe, Latin America, or the Middle East/Greater Asia.

    A theme concentration in which the student completes two courses (six semester credit hours) in Development, International Business & Public Policy, or International Conflict & Security

    Courses in both the area concentrations and theme concentrations must have the approval of the Program Head. Internships and independent studies may count toward either area or theme concentrations, with the permission of the Program Head.

    Elective Courses

    Students also select an additional six semester credit hours of coursework. Students may select courses from those courses not selected under Required Courses.

    Master of Public Policy

    36 semester credit hours minimum

    Faculty

    Professors: Brian J. L. Berry, Lloyd J. Dumas, Euel W. Elliott, Donald A. Hicks, Murray J. Leaf, Richard K. Scotch

    Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Simon M. Fass, Jennifer S. Holmes, Dohyeong Kim, Sheryl L. Skaggs

    Assistant Professor: Jonas Bunte

    Mission

    The Mission of the Master of Public Policy is to offer students an interdisciplinary graduate education designed to develop skills for careers in which a solid understanding of the public policy process and the analysis and evaluation of public policies are essential. Students will be prepared for analytical and administrative positions and responsibilities in a wide array of professional settings in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors as well as advanced study for careers in research. Specific skills include knowledge of the policy process and related ethical concerns, rigorous research skills that provide students with an essential grounding in statistical and data analysis and research design, and effective communication skills.

    Objectives

  • Students will understand and analyze the principal policy making institutions and the ways in which they formulate debate and implement public policies at the national, sub-national and local levels. Students will examine legislative, executive, and non-governmental roles in policy formation at different levels of government. They will analyze the ways in which the various institutions interact and set policy priorities. They will study policy implementation and the interrelated functions of levels of governments, nonprofit and corporate entities in policy implementation.
  • Students will learn and apply quantitative skills and economic theories to measure and evaluate public policies. They will learn when to apply appropriate techniques to complex policies. They will demonstrate an understanding of techniques to examine the preferred outcomes of policy alternatives to advise senior officials. Students will acquire skills in applying statistical measures of projected policy outcomes. Students will learn economic theories and acquire skills in applying those theories appropriately to establish policy objectives and outcomes.
  • Students will understand the role of and learn appropriate, rigorous ways to design research to increase knowledge of public policy and citizen welfare. Students will learn ways to quantitatively and qualitatively design research projects that address important public policy questions and concerns.
  • Students will learn and understand the unique role of ethical theories and behavior as it applies to the public and nonprofit sectors. Students will understand the ethical obligation of elected and appointed governmental officials to the body politic. Students will understand the functions of internal and public oversight of the formation and implementation of public policies.
  • Students will develop expertise in a substantive area of public policy and learn how to effectively communicate new findings and innovative policies to senior decision makers and the general public. Students will study one of three major public policy disciplines - social policy, health policy or the business-government relationship. Students will understand the theories and scientific principles that support these substantive policy areas and the ways in which those theories are tested. Students will understand how these policy areas contribute to the well-being of citizens to enhance the quality of life.
  • Qualified students are encouraged to consider the PhD in Public Policy and Political Economy (PPPE). Such students should meet with Program Head of PPPE as soon as possible to discussion options.
  • Facilities

    Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's Computer Labs. The School has two computing laboratories that have over 30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS, and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's Computer Labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

    Admissions Requirement

    The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2013/graduate/admission).

    The master's program in Public Policy seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or college. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 scale), and a verbal score of 156 and a quantitative score of 146 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Students should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

    Prerequisites

    While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design.

    Grading Policy

    In order to qualify for graduation, students must maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average in their degree program's core courses plus an aggregate grade point average of 3.0 for all graduate courses taken in the student's degree program at UT Dallas.

    Degree Requirements

    The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2013/graduate/policies/policy).

    Students seeking a Masters in Public Policy must complete at least 36 semester credit hours of graduate coursework in the program. The program has three components:

  • Twenty-one semester credit hours of required coursework
  • Nine semester credit hours of prescribed electives
  • Six semester credit hours of free electives
  • Students must maintain at least a 3.0 (B) grade point average to graduate.

    I. Major Required Core Courses: 21 semester credit hours

    Policymaking and Institutions (6 semester credit hours)

    POEC 6347 (PSCI 6347) Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics
    POEC 6329 Ethics, Culture, and Public Policy

    Methodology (Statistics, Research Design, and related courses - 9 semester credit hours)

    Methods Core (Algebra-based or Calculus based)

    Algebra-based series

    EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods
    EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

    or

    Calculus-based series

    EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
    EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

    Select one of the following:

    EPPS 6310 Research Design I
    EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

    Economics (3 semester credit hours)

    POEC 6321 Economics for Public Policy
    or POEC 7327 Innovation Dynamics and Economic Change

    Research Workshop or Internship (3 semester credit hours)

    A POEC Policy Research Workshop or internship or substitution as approved by the Program Head.

    II. Prescribed Electives: 9 semester credit hours

    Students complete nine semester credit hours in ONE of the following areas of concentration. All courses must be approved by the Program Head.

    A. Social Policy
    B. Security Studies
    C. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
    D. Analytic Methods

    Other concentration areas proposed by the student and approved by the Program Head.

    Students should consult the graduate catalog, and the Program Head, for additional information regarding those courses that would best satisfy the "Prescribed Electives" requirement

    III. Free Electives: 6 semester credit hours

    Students may select six semester credit hours of 6000 level or higher courses. Students may choose courses that are not selected under "Major Required Core Courses" to fulfill this requirement and may choose courses outside the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

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