UT Dallas 2015 Graduate Catalog

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Graduate Programs in Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science

75 semester credit hours minimum beyond the baccalaureate degree

Faculty

Professors: Thomas L. Brunell, Anthony M. Champagne, Harold D. Clarke, Euel W. Elliott, Edward J. Harpham, Jennifer S. Holmes, Robert C. Lowry, Todd Sandler, Marianne C. Stewart

Clinical Professor: Linda Camp Keith

Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Clint W. Peinhardt, Idean Salehyan

Clinical Associate Professors: Brian Bearry, Karl K. Ho

Assistant Professors: Jonas Bunte, Vito D'Orazio, Banks P. Miller

Mission Statement

The Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science provides a rigorous, disciplinary program with strong multidisciplinary links. The Program consists of innovative, state-of-the-science graduate education in political methodology and the fields of Comparative Politics and International Relations; Law and Courts; and Political Institutions and American Politics. In the first two years of the program, students acquire research skills and tools, work on research projects, and acquaint themselves with professional norms in the discipline. Later, they have opportunities to develop their instructional and presentation skills and to conduct research answering an important question (or questions) in the field. Throughout, emphasis is placed on preparing students for life after graduate school in academia, government, or industry.

Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate the ability to apply political science and other social scientific theories to research questions.
  • Students will develop the ability to apply advanced methodological training in understanding important political and social questions.
  • Students will develop advanced skills in professional communication appropriate for presentation to professional audiences in academia, government, or industry.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house 24-30 computers each that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Admission Requirements

The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/admission).

Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, the Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science Program seeks applications from students with at least a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.2 and a combined quantitative and verbal Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of 310 are desirable. Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Applicants should submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay describing educational and professional objectives.

Prerequisites:

While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in economics, political science, sociology, calculus, statistics, and research design.

Degree Requirements

The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/policies/policy).

The PhD in Political Science requires a minimum of 75 post-baccalaureate graduate semester credit hours. Full-time students can complete the degree in an average of 5 years. Students must receive a grade of B or better in all core courses and must maintain at least a 3.2 grade point average to graduate. If placed on probation, students will have one semester to bring their cumulative grade point average to a 3.0 or greater.

Semester Credit Hour Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  • 18 semester credit hours of core courses
  • Courses in Major Field: 12 semester credit hours
  • Courses in Minor Field: 6 semester credit hours
  • Core exam
  • Field exam
  • PSCI 8381 Research Seminar in Political Science (3 semester credit hours)
  • Electives: at least 12 semester credit hours
  • Matriculation to the dissertation phase
  • Successful completion of a dissertation
  • Successful completion of 75 semester credit hours

The requirements are outlined in further detail below.

I. Core Courses (18 semester credit hours)

Core semester credit hours include three courses in Political Science methodology and theory, and three proseminars in the program fields.

Methodology (6 semester credit hours)

One of the following sequences:

EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods and EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

or EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics and EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

All of the following: (12 semester credit hours)

PSCI 6300 Proseminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations

PSCI 6311 Proseminar in Law and Courts

PSCI 6347 Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics

PSCI 6350 Logic, Methodology, and Scope of Political Science

II. Major and Minor Field Courses (18 semester credit hours)

The field coursework consists of four courses (12 semester credit hours) taken in the student's chosen major filed and two course taken (6 semester credit hours) in the student's chosen minor filed for a total of 18 semester credit hours of coursework. Students may select their major and minors from the listed fields below.

Comparative Politics and International Relations

PPPE 6319 Political Economy of MNCs

PSCI 6305 Workshop in Constitutional Law Studies

PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

PSCI 6309 International Political Economy

PSCI 6316 International Organizations

PSCI 6335 Institutions and Development

PSCI 6337 Comparative Institutions

PSCI 6342 Comparative Courts and Law

PSCI 6352 Empirical Democratic Theory

PSCI 6357 Political Economy of Latin America

PSCI 6358 Refugee and Migration Policy

PSCI 6362 Political Development

PSCI 6363 Conflict and Development

PSCI 6361 Political Violence and Terrorism

PSCI 6365 U.S. and International Asylum and Refuge Law

PSCI 6374 U.S. Global Security and Public Opinion

PSCI 7330 Contemporary International Security

PSCI 7335 Theories of International Relations

PSCI 7350 Institutions and Citizen Behavior

Political Institutions and American Politics

PSCI 6301 Constitutional Law

PSCI 6323 Public Choice

PSCI 6324 Local and State Government and Politics

PSCI 6330 Campaigns and Elections

PSCI 6331 Executives, Legislatures and Public Policy

PSCI 6333 Political and Civic Organizations

PSCI 6337 Comparative Institutions

PSCI 6339 Election Law and Electoral Systems

PSCI 6343 Law and the Policy Process

PSCI 6352 Empirical Democratic Theory

PSCI 7350 Institutions and Citizen Behavior

PSCI 7352 Choice and Decision Making Law and Courts

PSCI 6301 Constitutional Law

PSCI 6305 Workshop in Constitutional Law Studies

PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

PSCI 6339 Election Law and Electoral Systems

PSCI 6342 Comparative Courts and Law

PSCI 6343 Law and the Policy Process

PSCI 6365 U.S. and International Asylum and Refuge Law

PPPE 6366 Law and Development

With approval of the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head, other classes may be substituted for field courses.

III. Optional Concentration in Research Methods (9 semester credit hours)

In addition to major and minor field concentrations, students who have completed EPPS 7313 and EPPS 7316 can complete a concentration in research methods by taking three courses from the following list.

ECON 6306 Applied Econometrics

ECON 6309 Econometrics I

ECON 6316 Spatial Econometrics

ECON 6320 Game Theory for the Social Sciences

ECON 6380 Experimental Economics I

ECON 7309 Econometrics II

ECON 7315 Econometrics III

ECON 7316 Game Theory

PPPE 6310 Research Design I

PPPE 6342 Research Design II

EPPS 6346 Qualitative Research Methods

EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis

EPPS 7318 Structural Equation and Multilevel (Hierarchical) Modeling

EPPS 7344 Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables

EPPS 7370 Time Series Analysis I

EPPS 7371 Time Series Analysis II

EPPS 7390 Bayesian Analysis for the Social and Behavioral Sciences

GISC 6301 GIS Data Analysis Fundamentals

GISC 6317 GIS Programming Fundamentals

GISC 7310 Advanced GIS Data Analysis

PSCI 6353 Mathematical Models in Political and Social Science

PSCI 6364 Public Opinion and Survey Research

PSCI 7352 Choice and Decision Making

PSCI 7372 Game Theory for Political Scientists

Other EPPS courses as approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head.

IV. Core and Field Exams

To advance to the dissertation stage of the program, students must pass both core and field exams. Core exams are taken at the first scheduled opportunity once students have completed the core classes. Students must take the field exam at the first scheduled opportunity following completion of four approved major field courses.

V. Additional Coursework (12 semester credit hours minimum)

Students must take at least 12 semester credit hours of additional coursework.

VI. Research Seminar (3 semester credit hours)

After the core and field exams have been successfully completed, students are required to enroll in PSCI 8381 Research Seminar in Political Science or in an independent study with their likely chair to develop their dissertation prospectus. Full-time students should defend their dissertation prospectus prior to the start of their 4th year.

VII. Electives and Dissertation Hours (variable semester credit hours)

In order to fulfill the 75 semester credit hour PhD requirement, students should enroll in a combination of additional electives and dissertation hours (PSCI 8V99 Dissertation). Students may not enroll in dissertation hours before they have successfully defended a dissertation proposal. No more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study (PSCI 7V83) may be taken, unless approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head.

VIII. Dissertation

There are two possible options of dissertation format. One is the "book-length" format. Another option is the "three-paper" dissertation, which consists of three papers that may or may not be thematically related. The submission of an approved dissertation will complete the course of study for the PhD degree in Political Science. The procedure for approval of the dissertation is outlined in the UT Dallas Graduate Catalog.

Master of Arts in Political Science

30 semester credit hours minimum

Faculty

Professors: Thomas L. Brunell, Anthony M. Champagne, Harold D. Clarke, Euel W. Elliott, Edward J. Harpham, Jennifer S. Holmes, Robert C. Lowry, Marianne C. Stewart

Clinical Professor: Linda Camp Keith

Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Clint W. Peinhardt, Idean Salehyan

Clinical Associate Professors: Brian Bearry, Karl K. Ho

Assistant Professors: Vito D'Orazio, Banks P. Miller

Mission

The mission of the Master of Arts in Political Science (MAPS) degree is to offer advanced instruction in the social science literature and theories about politics, citizenship, and governance. The program serves the interests and needs of talented students who can commit initially to a 30-semester credit hour program but may be attracted subsequently to the PhD program, as well as those who can commit initially to the doctoral program but subsequently decide not to complete the program.

Objectives

Students in the Master of Arts in Political Science program will:

  • Develop a competency in one of the fields of Comparative Politics and International Relations; Political Institutions and American Politics; or Law and Courts.
  • Develop skills in professional communication appropriate to political science research and analysis.
  • Develop competency in analysis, evaluation, and research design relevant to political science research and analysis.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories that have 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS, and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Admissions Requirement

The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/admission).

The Master of Arts in Political Science seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 scale), and a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 300 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Applicants should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

Prerequisites

While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design. In cases where undergraduate preparation is not adequate, students may be required to take additional course work before starting the master's program.

Degree Requirements

The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/policies/policy).

Students seeking a Master of Arts in Political Science must complete at least 30 semester credit hours of work in the program, must receive a grade of B- or better in all required courses, and must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average to graduate.

The curriculum has two components:

  1. Fifteen semester credit hours of required coursework
  2. Fifteen semester credit hours of prescribed electives

Required Courses: 15 semester credit hours

All students should complete the core courses as soon as possible.

All of the following courses:

EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

or EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

PSCI 6300 Proseminar in Comparative Politics and International Relations

PSCI 6311 Proseminar in Law and Courts

PSCI 6347 Proseminar on Political Institutions and American Politics

PSCI 6350 Logic, Methodology, and Scope of Political Science

Prescribed Electives: 15 semester credit hours

Two additional courses at the 6000 or 7000 level in one of the following fields: Comparative Politics and International Relations; Political Institutions and American Politics; or Law and Courts.

Three additional political science courses at the 6000 or 7000 level, or EPPS methods courses offered throughout the School, or internship. Students may write an optional thesis by registering for three semester credit hours of independent study.

Master of Arts in Political Science - Constitutional Law Studies

30 semester credit hours minimum

Faculty

Professors: Thomas L. Brunell, Anthony M. Champagne, Murray J. Leaf, Marianne C. Stewart

Clinical Professor: Linda Camp Keith

Associate Professor: Patrick T. Brandt

Assistant Professor: Banks P. Miller

Mission

The mission of the Master of Arts in Political Science - Constitutional Law Studies degree is to provide students with the reasoning and analytic skills necessary to understand the technical rules of law, legal practices and policies, and law more generally as a social phenomenon. It serves the interests and needs of students who want an intellectually rigorous legal education as preparation for law school, for more advanced graduate learning, or for law-related careers in teaching, journalism, government, policy-making, or the private sector.

Objectives

Students in the Master of Arts in Political Science - Constitutional Law Studies program will:

  • Acquire detailed knowledge of the role of the judicial system in the evolution of public policy in the United States.
  • Acquire detailed knowledge of the roles played by practicing attorneys in the development and application of public law in the United States.
  • Develop competency in the application of theories of the evolution of constitutional law to United States Supreme Court decisions.
  • Demonstrate the ability to conduct original research on law and courts using skills in legal research and writing, quantitative research or field research.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house 24-30 computers each that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Admissions Requirement

The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/admission).

The Master of Arts in Political Science seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 point scale), and a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 300 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Applicants should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives. Applications are reviewed by the Political Science Program Committee in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

Prerequisites

While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design. In cases where undergraduate preparation is not adequate, students may be required to take additional course work before starting the master's program.

Degree Requirements

The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/policies/policy).

Students seeking a Master of Arts in Political Science - Constitutional Law Studies must complete at least 30 semester credit hours of work in the program, must receive a grade of B- or better in all required courses, and must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average to graduate.

The curriculum has two components:

  1. Twelve semester credit hours of required coursework
  2. Eighteen semester credit hours of prescribed electives

Required Courses: 12 semester credit hours

All of the following courses:

EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

or EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

PSCI 6301 Constitutional Law

PSCI 6311 Proseminar in Law and Courts

PSCI 6350 Logic, Methodology, and Scope of Political Science

Prescribed Electives: 18 semester credit hours

Choose six courses from the following:

EPPS 6316 Applied Regression or EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

PPPE 6366 Law and Development

PSCI 6304 Internship in Constitutional Law Studies

PSCI 6305 Workshop in Constitutional Law Studies

PSCI 6306 Human Rights and International Law

PSCI 6331 Executives, Legislatures and Public Policy

PSCI 6339 Election Law and Electoral Systems

PSCI 6342 Comparative Courts and Law

PSCI 6343 Law and the Policy Process

PSCI 6365 US and International Asylum and Refuge Law

Other courses as approved by the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head.

Master of Arts in Political Science - Legislative Studies

30 semester credit hours minimum

Faculty

Professors: Thomas L. Brunell, Anthony M. Champagne, Harold D. Clarke, Euel W. Elliott, Edward J. Harpham, Robert C. Lowry, Marianne C. Stewart

Clinical Professor: Linda Camp Keith

Associate Professors: Patrick T. Brandt, Clint W. Peinhardt

Assistant Professor: Banks P. Miller

Mission

The mission of the Master of Arts in Political Science - Legislative Studies degree is to offer instruction for students interested in positions as legislative staff, political consultants, or other careers in professional politics. Students will receive instruction that moves beyond the standard coursework in American and Texas government and politics by advancing their knowledge of legislative processes and the role that legislatures play at the local, state, and national levels of government.

Objectives

Students in the Master of Arts in Political Science - Legislative Studies program will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of political institutions and processes in the United States and their effects on politics and policy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of issues in contemporary democracies involving representation, influence, and the balance of majority and minority interests, and the ability to evaluate political institutions and processes in the United States.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in skills required for at least one position in the practice of politics by successfully completing an internship.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing faculties in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and University's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which house 24-30 computers each that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The University's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Admissions Requirement

The University's general admission requirements are discussed on the Graduate Admission page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/admission).

The Master of Arts in Political Science seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 point scale), and a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 300 on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). Standardized test scores are only one of the factors taken into account in determining admission. Applicants should also submit all transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a one-page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives.

Prerequisites

While there are no specific course prerequisites, entering students will benefit from exposure to undergraduate courses in the economics, political sciences, sociology, college algebra, statistics, public policy, and research design. In cases where undergraduate preparation is not adequate, students may be required to take additional course work before starting the master's program.

Degree Requirements

The University's general degree requirements are discussed on the Graduate Policies and Procedures page (catalog.utdallas.edu/2015/graduate/policies/policy).

Students seeking a Master of Arts in Political Science - Legislative Studies must complete at least 30 semester credit hours of work in the program, must receive a grade of B- or better in all required classes, and must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average to graduate.

Major Required Courses: 9 semester credit hours

EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

or EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics

PSCI 6347 Proseminar in Political Institutions and American Politics

PSCI 6350 Logic, Methodology, and Scope of Political Science

Prescribed Electives: 9 semester credit hours

Three from the following list of courses:

EPPS 6316 Applied Regression

or EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

EPPS 7386 Survey Research

PSCI 6324 Local and State Government and Politics

PSCI 6330 Campaigns and Elections

PSCI 6331 Executives, Legislatures and Public Policy

PSCI 6333 Political and Civic Organizations

PSCI 6339 Election Law and Electoral Systems

PSCI 6341 Texas Legislative Process

PSCI 6343 Law and the Policy Process

PSCI 6352 Empirical Democratic Theory

PSCI 7350 Institutions and Citizen Behavior

PSCI 6364 Public Opinion and Survey Research

Free Electives: 6 semester credit hours

Two additional courses at the 6000-level or above offered by programs in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, subject to approval by the Director of Graduate Studies or Program Head. These may include additional courses from the list above.

Internship: 6 semester credit hours

PSCI 6V42 Legislative Affairs Internship (6 semester credit hours total; can be spread over more than one semester). Internships can be done in Austin, TX or Washington, D.C., or with another state or local government agency or political organization.

Updated: 2015-05-06 14:14:22 - v13