UT Dallas 2014 Graduate Catalog

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Graduate Programs in Criminology

Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology

75 semester credit hours minimum beyond the baccalaureate degree

Program Faculty

Professors: Bruce A. Jacobs, James W. Marquart, Alex R. Piquero, Nicole Leeper Piquero, Robert W. Taylor, John L. Worrall

Associate Professors: Denise Paquette Boots, Tomislav Kovandzic, Robert G. Morris II, Lynne M. Vieraitis

Assistant Professor: Nadine Connell

Clinical Professor: Elmer Polk

Clinical Assistant Professor: Timothy M. Bray

Senior Lecturer: Galia Cohen

Mission

The mission of the Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology at The University of Texas at Dallas is threefold in nature, in order to:

  1. Deliver high-quality education to a diverse body of graduate students regarding the etiology, control, and variation of lawbreaking across space and time.
  2. Serve local, regional, and national communities through professional development programs, public policy analyses, evaluation research, program and policy design, and a forum for new approaches to the study of crime.
  3. Advance the understanding of criminology through a multidisciplinary mix of theoretical and applied research.

Objectives

The doctoral program in Criminology is an interdisciplinary, research-oriented degree offered in conjunction with other graduate programs in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at UT Dallas. The objective of the PhD program is to provide students a coherent, yet intellectually challenging degree that adequately prepares them to conduct research among the many aspects of criminology and criminal justice, varying with individual interests and areas of specialty. Graduates of the PhD program will be qualified to teach at the university level as professors. Graduates will also be competent to enter into analytic and administrative posts within the vast array of research and policy institutions, criminal justice organizations, and in the private sector.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the university's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which have 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, PASW, Stata, LexisNexis database, and Westlaw for student use. The university's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX Workstations. Data and reference materials are also available online via the library and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Application and Admission Requirements

The PhD Program in Criminology seeks applicants who have completed a Master's in Criminology or a relevant discipline from an institution of higher education. A graduate GPA (grade point average) of 3.50 and a GRE combined verbal and quantitative score of 300 are desirable, but students may be admitted at the program's discretion. All transcripts must be submitted, along with three letters of recommendation (preferably academic) and a one-page essay describing their background, education, and professional objectives. To be considered for Fall admissions and funding opportunities, applications must be submitted in full by February 15. Students can apply as late as July 1, per university policy, but they will likely not be considered for funding opportunities. Students should note their desire to be considered for graduate funding in their letter of intent at the time of application. For more information please see our Graduate Handbook on our website www.utdallas.edu/epps/crim/.

Degree Requirements

On admission to the PhD in Criminology Program, a student must earn a minimum of 75 semester credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree, pass a qualifying methods examination, pass the criminology comprehensive examination, and successfully complete independent research. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Coursework: 75 credit semester credit hours of graduate study (minus transferred master's semester credit hours up to 30 semester credit hours)
  • Qualifying Methods Examination
  • Comprehensive Examination
  • Doctoral Dissertation

A grade of "B-" or lower in any graduate class requires that the class be retaken with only one retake allowed per course. If the retake results in a final grade of "B-" or lower, the student will be dropped from the program. In addition, all students must meet the university's minimum required GPA of 3.0 or higher. See the Criminology Graduate Program Handbook located on the Criminology website for more specific requirements.

Course Requirements

Coursework: 75 semester credit hours of graduate study (minus transferred or master's semester credit hours up to 30 semester credit hours)

Criminology core classes (15 semester credit hours)

CRIM 6307 Extent of Crime and Measurement
CRIM 7300 Advances in Criminology Theory
CRIM 7301 Seminar in Criminology Research and Analysis
CRIM 7305 Professional Development in Criminology
CRIM 7315 Evidence-based Crime Prevention

Methodology/Statistics core classes (9 semester credit hours)

EPPS 6310 Research Design1
EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics
EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

A grade of "B-" or lower in any core graduate class requires that the class be retaken. Only one retake is allowed per course. If the retake results in a final grade of "B-" or lower, the student will be dropped from the program. In addition, all students must meet the university's minimum required GPA of 3.0 or higher. See the Graduate Program Handbook located on the Criminology website for more specific requirements.

Methodology or Advanced Statistics Elective (3 semester credit hours)

Students must select one additional methodology or advanced statistics course. Students may select this course from any number of methodology or statistics courses offered through the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences (EPPS).

Sample of Methodology or Advanced Statistics Courses:

EPPS 6346 Qualitative Research Methods
EPPS 6352 Evaluation Research Methods in the Economic, Political and Policy Sciences
EPPS 7304 Cost-Benefit Analysis
EPPS 7318 Structural Equation and Multilevel (Hierarchical) Modeling
EPPS 7344 Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables
EPPS 7368 Spatial Epidemiology
EPPS 7370 Time Series Analysis
EPPS 7386 Survey Research
EPPS 7390 Bayesian Analysis for Social and Behavioral Sciences

Elective Courses (39 semester credit hours)

Students take free electives in areas of interest to fulfill the 75 semester credit hour PhD requirement.

Per university policy, students may apply up to 36 semester credit hours of master's level credit into the doctoral program. Courses being applied must have earned a grade of "B" or better from an institution of higher education. All students should consult with the Criminology Doctoral Advisor to determine which courses will be accepted toward the PhD in Criminology. The Criminology Doctoral Advisor has sole discretion to decide the number and manner in which transfer credits will be applied.

Dissertation Research (minimum of 9 semester credit hours)

A dissertation or a three-paper option requirement must be completed in order to successfully complete the Criminology doctoral program. Students will select a dissertation chair and a supervising committee to advise them through the research component of the doctoral requirement.

The dissertation is an original work initiated and completed by the doctoral candidate that demonstrates research competence and substantially adds to the knowledge in the candidate's field. The three-paper option is composed of a set of articles that together represent a significant and coherent contribution to our knowledge in the field of Criminology.

Regardless of the option selected, students will enroll in CRIM 8V99 during each semester until the research is completed and defended. The final dissertation defense is completed when the student's dissertation chair and supervising committee agree that the research has been satisfactorily completed.

Qualifying Methods Examination

Students must pass the Qualifying Methods Examination following the completion of the first academic year (or 18 semester credit hours) in order to continue in the Criminology PhD program. This exam is based on materials from the following four courses: (1) EPPS 6310 Research Design I, (2) EPPS 7313 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics, (3) EPPS 7316 Regression and Multivariate Analysis, and (4) CRIM 6307 Extent of Crime and Measurement. The exam will be administered once each year in late April or May. Student performance will be evaluated as pass or fail. Those failing the exam will be given a second opportunity to pass the exam at the end of the summer. Those failing the Qualifying Methods Examination the second time will be dismissed from the program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students will sit for the Criminology comprehensive examination after successfully completing all coursework (66 semester credit hours) but no later than the end of year three in the PhD program. This exam is offered twice per year, once in the fall and again in the spring. The comprehensive examination will test students' knowledge in two topical areas: theory and policy. Student performance will be evaluated as pass or fail on each section. Those failing a section of the exam will be given a second opportunity to pass the failed section in the following semester. Those who fail either section of the exam for the second time will be dismissed from the Criminology program.

Master of Science in Criminology

36 semester credit hours minimum

Program Faculty

Professors: Bruce A. Jacobs, James W. Marquart, Alex R. Piquero, Nicole Leeper Piquero, Robert W. Taylor, John L. Worrall

Associate Professors: Denise Paquette Boots, Tomislav Kovandzic, Robert G. Morris II, Lynne M. Vieraitis

Assistant Professor: Nadine Connell

Clinical Professor: Elmer Polk

Clinical Assistant Professor: Timothy M. Bray

Senior Lecturer: Galia Cohen

Mission

The mission of the Master of Science in Criminology program at The University of Texas at Dallas is threefold, to:

  1. Deliver high-quality education to a diverse body of students regarding the etiology, control, and variation of law-breaking across space and time.
  2. Serve local, regional, and national communities through professional development programs, public policy analyses and evaluation research, program and policy design, and as a forum for new ideas and approaches to the study of crime.
  3. Advance the understanding of criminology through a multidisciplinary mix of theoretical and applied research, as well as to provide a forum for new ideas and approaches to the study of crime.

Objectives

The Master of Science (MS) in Criminology provides students with a coherent yet intellectually challenging degree that prepares them to conduct interdisciplinary research among the many aspects of criminology and criminal justice, varying with individual interests and areas of specialty. Graduates of the MS program will be competent to teach at the community college and at the university level as adjunct lecturers. Graduates will also be ready to enter into analytic and administrative posts within a vast array of research and policy institutions, criminal justice organizations, and in the private sector.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the university's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which have 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The university's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library's and the school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Application and Admission Requirements

The Master of Science in Criminology seeks applicants from a baccalaureate in Criminology, Sociology, or a relevant discipline. A 3.2 undergraduate GPA and a combined GRE verbal and quantitative score of 300 are desirable, but students may be admitted at the program's discretion. All transcripts must be submitted, along with three letters of recommendation (preferably academic) and a one-page essay describing their background, education, and professional objectives. For more information please see our Graduate Handbook on our website.

Prerequisites

For the Master of Science in Criminology, students with an undergraduate degree in Criminology or a related field will have the necessary academic foundation to begin their graduate coursework (See the Graduate Program Handbook which is posted on the EPPS website for more information on Prerequisites and Transfer Policies at epps.utdallas.edu/crim).

Program of Studies Policy

Each student admitted to a graduate program will have a specific program of studies agreed upon in consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee or graduate advisor for Criminology per the degree plan for the program. A complete Program of Studies Form will be filled in and approved prior to the student's registration for his/her 19th semester credit hour to be counted toward a master's degree.

Writing Requirement (MS in Criminology)

All Doctoral track students must complete a writing requirement while enrolled in the MS Program. Students must take a minimum of six semester credit hours of CRIM 6V96 or CRIM 6V98, complete an independent paper, and present their findings in a colloquium setting to be eligible for graduation with the MS.

Non-Writing Requirement Option for the MS in Criminology

MS students on a terminal track who do not wish to be considered for admission into a doctoral program have the option of taking 6 semester credit hours of any graduate classes as electives in lieu of the writing requirement.

Required Courses: 15 semester credit hours

CRIM 6300 Proseminar in Criminology
CRIM 6303 Etiology of Crime and Criminality
CRIM 6311 Crime and Justice Policy
EPPS 6310 Research Design I
EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

Elective Courses: 21 semester credit hours

9 semester credit hours in Elective Criminology graduate courses
and 6 semester credit hours in any program or school outside Criminology
and 6 semester credit hours of CRIM 6V98 Analytical Writing Research (for PhD track students)
or 6 semester credit hours of graduate-level course electives (for students wishing to terminate at MS)

Master of Science in Criminology (Online)

36 semester credit hours minimum

Program Faculty

Professors: Bruce A. Jacobs, James W. Marquart, Alex R. Piquero, Nicole Leeper Piquero, Robert W. Taylor, John L. Worrall

Associate Professors: Denise Paquette Boots, Tomislav Kovandzic, Robert G. Morris II, Lynne M. Vieraitis

Assistant Professors: Nadine Connell

Clinical Professor: Elmer Polk

Clinical Assistant Professor: Timothy M. Bray

Mission

The mission of the Master of Science in Criminology program at The University of Texas at Dallas is threefold, to:

  • Deliver high-quality education to a diverse body of students regarding the etiology, control, and variation of law-breaking across space and time.
  • Serve local, regional, and national communities through professional development programs, public policy analyses and evaluation research, program and policy design, and as a forum for new ideas and approaches to the study of crime.
  • Advance the understanding of criminology through a multidisciplinary mix of theoretical and applied research, as well as to provide a forum for new ideas and approaches to the study of crime.

Objectives

The Master of Science (MS) in Criminology provides students with a coherent yet intellectually challenging degree that prepares them to conduct interdisciplinary research among the many aspects of criminology and criminal justice, varying with individual interests and areas of specialty.

The fully online MS in Criminology offers students the convenience of completing coursework on their own schedules.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences and the university's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which have 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The university's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library's and school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Prerequisites

For the Master of Science in Criminology (Online), students with an undergraduate degree in Criminology or a related field will have the necessary academic foundation to begin their graduate coursework (See the Graduate Program Handbook which is posted on the EPPS website for more information on Prerequisites and Transfer Policies at epps.utdallas.edu/crim).

Program of Studies Policy

Each student admitted to a graduate program will have a specific program of studies agreed upon in consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee or graduate advisor for Criminology per the degree plan for the program. A complete Program of Studies Form will be filed in and approved prior to the student's registration for his/her 19th semester credit hour to be counted toward a master's degree.

Non-Writing Requirement Option for the MS in Criminology

MS students on a terminal track who do not wish to be considered for admission into a doctoral program have the option of taking 6 semester credit hours of any graduate classes as electives in lieu of the writing requirement.

Required Courses: 15 semester credit hours

CRIM 6300 Proseminar in Criminology
CRIM 6303 Etiology of Crime and Criminality
CRIM 6311 Crime and Justice Policy
EPPS 6310 Research Design I
EPPS 6313 Introduction to Quantitative Methods

Elective Courses: 21 semester credit hours

15 semester credit hours in Elective Criminology graduate courses
And one of the following:
6 semester credit hours of non-CRIM graduate electives (online, in any program or school)
6 semester credit hours of CRIM 8V01 (for independent study project-directed by a faculty member)

Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership

30 semester credit hours minimum

Program Faculty

Professors: James W. Marquart, Robert W. Taylor, John L. Worrall

Associate Professors: Denise Paquette Boots, Robert G. Morris II

Clinical Professor: Elmer Polk

Mission

The mission of the Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership program at The University of Texas at Dallas is to:

  • Deliver high-quality education to working professionals who in turn will examine the role of leadership within justice agencies and organizations.
  • Prepare students to evaluate and apply relevant research findings on leadership and administration to lead, influence, and manage others in an increasingly diverse workforce and work environment.
  • Advance the understanding of the consequences of change within justice organizations, and lead and manage personnel in periods of organizational change.
  • Prepare students to apply relevant techniques of leadership, management, conflict resolution, and negotiation when confronted with change and subsequent conflict in justice and related organizations.

Objectives

The Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership (MS-JAL) is housed in the Criminology Program and provides students with a coherent and intellectually challenging degree that prepares a new generation of leaders to manage and administer justice and other social service organizations. The program will deliver an innovative and integrated curriculum that connects such key components of leadership and administration in the justice setting as policy implementation and analysis, organizational behavior and change, planning and decision-making, and legal issues and conflict resolution to prepare students for supervisory and executive positions.

Facilities

Students have access to the computing facilities in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, and the university's computer labs. The school has four computing laboratories which have 24-30 computers that are network linked and equipped with major social science software packages, including EViews, R, RATS, SPSS and Stata. A computerized geographic information system, the LexisNexis database, and Westlaw are also available for student use. The university's computer labs provide personal computers and UNIX workstations. Many important data and reference materials are also available online via the library's and school's memberships in numerous organizations.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate teaching and research assistantships will not be available.

Admissions Requirement

The Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership (MS-JAL) seeks applications from students with a baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education or college. Although applications will be reviewed holistically, in general, entering students have earned a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (on a 4.0 point scale). Students should also submit an online application, all transcripts, two letters of recommendation, a resume, and a one-to-two page essay outlining the applicant's background, education, and professional objectives. Applications are reviewed by the MS-JAL Program Director and appropriate faculty in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences.

Prerequisites

For the Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership, students with a Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice, Criminology, Public Administration, or general business will have the necessary foundation for the master's degree. Students who lack this foundation should complete the following undergraduate courses at UT Dallas or their equivalents at another institution: CRIM 3302 Advanced Criminology, CRIM 3303 Advanced Criminal Justice, and CRIM 3304 Research Methods in Crime and Justice Studies. Prospective students with concerns about their preparation for the program are encouraged to consult with the program director.

Degree Requirements

Students seeking an Executive Master of Science in Justice Administration and Leadership degree must complete 30 semester credit hours of coursework in the program. The Core curriculum includes 12 semester credit hours in criminal justice policy and criminology, 9 semester credit hours in public administration and practice courses, 6 semester credit hours in legal aspects of administration and dispute resolution, and 3 semester credit hours of independent research acting as a capstone project to satisfy a writing requirement. Students must achieve at least an overall grade point average of 3.0 to graduate.

Core Courses: 30 semester credit hours

Criminology (12 semester credit hours)

CRIM 6311 Crime and Justice Policy
CRIM 6390 Administration of Justice Agencies
CRIM 6395 Contemporary Issues in Justice Administration
One 3 semester credit hour CRIM elective (6000 level course)

Public Administration (9 semester credit hours)

PA 6316 Leadership in Public and Nonprofit Management
PA 6345 Human Resource Management
PA 6351 (CRIM 6351) Introduction to Homeland Security

Legal Aspects and Dispute Resolutions (6 semester credit hours)

CRIM 6312 Legal Aspects of Justice Administration
PA 6319 Topics in Public Affairs [when topic is Negotiation and Dispute Resolutions]

Capstone Course Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

CRIM 6399 Capstone in Justice Administration
Other courses may substitute for those listed with the approval of the Executive MS-JAL Director or the Criminology Program Head.
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