UT Dallas 2016 Graduate Catalog

Accounting

ACCT 6193 Professional Accounting - Regulation (1 semester credit hour) This course is designed to help students prepare for careers in professional accounting and professional examinations. ACCT 3350 or ACCT 3351 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisites: (ACCT 6350 or ACCT 6351) and ACCT 6353. (1-0) R

ACCT 6194 Professional Accounting - Business (1 semester credit hour) This course is designed to help students prepare for careers in professional accounting and professional examinations. Prerequisites: (ACCT 4336 or ACCT 6344) and (ACCT 4342 or ACCT 6343) and (ACCT 3341 or ACCT 6331). (1-0) R

ACCT 6201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (2 semester credit hours) This course explores the role of financial accounting information in the economy and explains how accounting information found in financial statements and annual reports is used in decision-making by investors, analysts, creditors and managers. This course is an MS Accounting program prerequisite and cannot be used for MS Accounting degree credit. (2-0) S

ACCT 6202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (2 semester credit hours) This course presents a detailed study of how managerial accounting information is prepared and how it supports the operational and strategic needs of the enterprise. Managers use accounting information for decision-making, planning, evaluating and controlling activities within organizations. This course is an MS Accounting program prerequisite and cannot be used for MS Accounting degree credit. (2-0) S

ACCT 6287 Board Membership, Risk Management and Compliance (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course will consider the functions of the board of directors. Topics include strategy, risk management and compliance. (2-0) Y

ACCT 6291 Professional Accounting - Financial (2 semester credit hours) This course is designed to help students prepare for careers in professional accounting and professional examinations. Prerequisites: (ACCT 3331 or ACCT 6330) and (ACCT 3332 or ACCT 6332) and (ACCT 6333 or ACCT 6365). (2-0) R

ACCT 6292 Professional Accounting - Audit (2 semester credit hours) This course is designed to help students prepare for careers in professional accounting and professional examinations. Prerequisites: (ACCT 4334 or ACCT 6334), and ACCT 6335. (2-0) R

ACCT 6305 (SYSM 6337) Accounting for Managers (3 semester credit hours) Fundamental concepts in accounting and financial reporting are presented from the perspective of business managers. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Accounting. Credit cannot be received for both courses, (ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6202) and ACCT 6305. (3-0) S

ACCT 6309 (MIS 6309) Business Data Warehousing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides the student with in depth knowledge of data warehousing principles, data warehouse techniques, and business intelligence systems. The course introduces the topics of data warehouse design, Extract-Transform-Load (ETL), data cubes, and data marts. Students will create business intelligence using data warehouses with several OLAP and analytical tools. SAP, Business Objects, Cognos, or other data warehousing tools will be used to illustrate data warehousing concepts. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6312 (MIS 6311) Cybersecurity Fundamentals (3 semester credit hours) The course provides an overview of various technical and managerial issues associated with cybersecurity. The topics include risk assessment and management, cybersecurity programs, IT security controls and technologies, security standards and laws, IT auditing, cyber insurance, and other cyber risk mitigation strategies. (3-0) S

ACCT 6320 (BUAN 6320 and MIS 6320 and OPRE 6393) Database Foundations (3 semester credit hours) The course provides database knowledge for non-MIS business students to function effectively in their functional area. The course covers conceptual data modeling with the entity-relationship diagram, the fundamentals of relational data model and database queries, and the basic concepts of data warehousing. Structured Query Language will be used extensively. Applications of databases for accounting, finance, marketing, and other areas of business will be emphasized. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Information Technology and Management. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6320 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6330 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (3 semester credit hours) A study of external financial reporting, including revenue recognition and the measurement and reporting of cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant, and equipment, and intangibles. Financial statement presentation issues are analyzed to gain an appreciation for the impact of generally accepted accounting principles on business decisions. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Accounting program because it is a program prerequisite. ACCT 2301 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6331 Cost Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Nature, measurement and analysis of accounting data appropriate to managerial decision making, and comprehensive budgeting; statistical cost estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; gross profit analysis; application of probability to cost control; capital planning. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Accounting program because it is a program prerequisite. ACCT 2302 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6202 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6332 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (3 semester credit hours) This course is a continuation of topics in external financial reporting, including: issues related to the measurement and reporting of current liabilities and contingencies, bonds, leases, deferred taxes, pensions, stock-based compensation plans, shareholders equity, earnings per share, accounting changes, and cash flows. Current generally accepted accounting principles for financial reporting are analyzed. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Accounting program because it is a program prerequisite. ACCT 3331 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6330 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6333 Advanced Financial Reporting (3 semester credit hours) The application of accounting principles in complex settings is studied. Topics include accounting for business combinations, consolidated entities, partnerships, transactions in foreign currency, hedging of foreign currency, and translation of financial statements reported in foreign currency. ACCT 3332 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6332. (3-0) S

ACCT 6334 Auditing (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the basic concepts, philosophy, standards, procedures, and practices of auditing. Topics include generally accepted auditing standards, the role of the independent auditor, professional conduct and ethics, auditor's reporting responsibilities, risk assessment, internal control, evidential matter, and management fraud. ACCT 3331 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6330 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6335 Ethics for Professional Accountants (3 semester credit hours) Ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence and other core values as defined by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants are presented. (3-0) S

ACCT 6336 (HMGT 6336 and MIS 6337) Information Technology Audit and Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Management's role in designing and controlling information technology used to process data is studied. Topics include the role of internal and external auditors in systems development, information security, business continuity, information technology, internet, change management, and operations. Focus is placed on the assurance of controls over information technology risks and covers topics directly related to the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6338 (MIS 6338) Accounting Systems Integration and Configuration (3 semester credit hours) Using SAP or similar software, this course focuses on accounting information systems as part of integrated enterprise systems and modern systems analysis and design of integrated accounting systems and related internal control. Emphasis will be on integrated business processes and related financial transaction flows, system analysis and design methods in SAP with focus on configuration methods. ACCT 2302 will also be counted as a prerequisite or corequisite. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 6202 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ACCT 6340 (MIS 6308) System Analysis and Project Management (3 semester credit hours) Provides the student with an in-depth knowledge of object oriented systems analysis and design procedures. Software project management techniques will be introduced. At the end of the course, the student will be able to analyze business solutions and design computer based information systems using object-oriented methodologies. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MIS 6320 or MIS 6326. (3-0) R

ACCT 6341 Planning, Control and Performance Evaluation (3 semester credit hours) The application of management accounting for planning, control and performance evaluation is studied for various business situations. Topics include planning, budgeting, performance evaluation, centers of responsibility, modern control methods, management compensation, and transfer pricing. Extensive use of cases is used to apply strategic management accounting concepts. ACCT 2302 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6202 or ACCT 6305 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6342 Strategic Cost Management (3 semester credit hours) Cost analysis is integrated with strategic analysis to understand the role of financial and non-financial information in operational and strategic decision-making. Topics may include strategic value chain analysis, strategic positioning analysis, activity based management, line of business evaluation, life cycle costing, technology costing, target costing, quality cost management, balanced scorecard, and sustainability reporting. ACCT 2302 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6202 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent. (3-0) R

ACCT 6343 Accounting Information Systems (3 semester credit hours) Managing the design, control and operation of accounting information systems in a computerized organizational environment is studied. The emphasis is on identifying the information needs of decision makers and developing appropriate business process control in the design of accounting information systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6344 Financial Statement Analysis (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of financial statements for evaluating firm performance and risk. Topics include interpretation of financial statements and footnotes, managers' incentives for earnings manipulation, comparative analysis of firms, and ethics in financial reporting. ACCT 2301 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6345 Business Valuation (3 semester credit hours) Financial statement based valuation models are studied. Topics include earnings management, income measurement and profitability assessment, discounted cash flow, and accounting-based valuation models. ACCT 2301 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6349 (MIS 6302) Information Technology Strategy and Management (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the strategic management and control issues associated with information technology. It provides a framework to understand how IT strategy aligns with business strategy and focuses on developing an understanding of the key information requirements for developing an IT strategy and systems architecture. This includes conducting IT sourcing analysis, and managing IT investments effectively to maximize business value. The course will consist of a mix of real-world case studies on IT strategy development across different industries. Credit cannot be received for both ACCT 6349 and MIS 6302. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6350 Fundamentals of Taxation I (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the role of taxes in today's society and their impact on individuals and business entities; emphasis on federal individual income taxation. ACCT 2301 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6353 Fundamentals of Taxation II (3 semester credit hours) Certain common and special Federal tax laws for individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts, and miscellaneous entities. Topics include income tax returns for partnerships and business corporations. Survey coverage of corporate tax issues, IRS audits, and exposure to partnerships, estate and gifts and international taxation. ACCT 3350 or ACCT 3351 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6350 or ACCT 6351 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6354 Partnership Taxation (3 semester credit hours) The tax law is studied as it relates to the formation of a partnership, the determination of the taxable income of the partnership and the distributive shares of the partners, the tax consequences of distributions by a partnership and of transfers of interests in a partnership. ACCT 3350 or ACCT 3351 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6350 or ACCT 6351 or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6356 Tax Research (3 semester credit hours) Identification and evaluation of legal authorities applicable to tax issues for individual and business taxpayers are studied. Application of research in tax planning and administrative procedures in a tax practice, emphasizing the structure of the Internal Revenue Service and its impact on a tax practitioner. ACCT 3350 or ACCT 3351 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6350 or ACCT 6351 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6359 Accounting Policy and Research (3 semester credit hours) This course enables students to develop their knowledge and appreciation of current debates that surround the accounting profession. Students sharpen their critical thinking skills in the context of these issues and form and defend opinions about contemporary regulatory and market issues. The course exposes students to important academic research in accounting and the primary methods underlying it. The course focuses on in-class discussions and presentations, features guest lecturers, consists of a significant amount of reading material and requires class participation. ACCT 3331 and ACCT 3332 will also be counted as prerequisites. Prerequisites: ACCT 6330 and ACCT 6332. (3-0) R

ACCT 6362 International Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Accounting and auditing functions and activities in various international environments are evaluated also in the context of international accounting and auditing harmonization. Causes of international differences and international classification efforts are examined. Comparison between International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and prevailing US Accounting Principles (FASB) and contemplated convergence between the two systems are appraised. Accounting concepts, standards, methods, and practices in foreign environments and their relationship to US accounting are assessed. Topics include foreign currency translation, consolidation, performance measurement of international entities, accounting for international operations, comparative accounting systems, transfer pricing, and financial reporting of foreign and multinational corporations. ACCT 2301 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6365 Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Accounting practices for governmental and not-for-profit organizations are studied, including accounting requirements for institutions, municipalities, and state and federal government. Topics include performance budgeting, systems analysis, and accounting implications of economic decisions. ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 will be counted as prerequisites. Prerequisite: (ACCT 6201 and ACCT 6202) or ACCT 6305 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ACCT 6366 Special Topics in Taxation (3 semester credit hours) This course builds upon topics taught throughout the required tax curriculum. Topics will be determined based on current tax events and issues and may delve into advanced problems in areas such as international taxation, state and local tax, as well as other current and relevant tax topics. This course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply their tax knowledge through problem solving based on hypothetical taxpayers. Prerequisite: ACCT 6352 or ACCT 6353. (3-0) R

ACCT 6367 Multijurisdictional Taxation (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the taxation of business entities and individuals by competing taxing jurisdictions. This course also addresses state taxation concepts, including nexus, allocation, and apportionment issues and examines cross-border and international tax issues emphasizing "outbound" investments and activities of U.S. taxpayers. ACCT 3350 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6350 or equivalent or Prerequisite or Corequisite ACCT 6353. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6370 Business Law (3 semester credit hours) Laws affecting business organizations and laws influencing managerial decision-making are examined. Topics include contract law, law of agency, law of commercial transactions, and the uniform commercial code and the laws relating to the formation and operation of corporations. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6372 Business Law for Accountants (3 semester credit hours) Laws specifically affecting business organizations and the financial impact are examined. The course focuses on business laws that impact accountants and business transactions as well as uniform commercial code, contract law, law of agency, law of commercial transactions and the laws relating to the formation and operation of corporations. (3-0) S

ACCT 6373 Advanced External Auditing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an in-depth view of issues related to external audit. The course covers current and emerging issues such as enterprise risk management, advanced communication techniques, managing the audit group, and quality assessment reviews. Weekly assignments and case studies are discussed in detail along with a major project with practitioners. ACCT 4334 will also be counted as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ACCT 6334. (3-0) S

ACCT 6377 Corporate Governance (3 semester credit hours) Corporate governance is a system of policies and processes established and maintained by a board of directors and top management to oversee an organization's strategic activities and resulting performance. The system seeks to ensure proper accountability, probity, and openness in the conduct of an organization's business for the long-term benefit of its shareholders by causing the right questions to be asked and by placing checks and balances in place to ascertain the answers reflect reality. Thus, corporate governance focuses on enhancing the relationships among a company's board of directors, top management, investors (particularly institutional investors), and other stakeholders. Each session has two themes: issues are addressed academically by the instructor and pragmatically by prominent practitioners. (3-0) S

ACCT 6380 (HMGT 6380) Internal Audit (3 semester credit hours) The course covers internal audit from a broad perspective that includes information technology, business processes, and accounting systems. Topics include internal auditing standards, risk assessment, governance, ethics, audit techniques, consulting and emerging internal audit issues. This is the first course leading to Internal Auditing Education Partnership (IAEP) Certificate and prepares students for the Certified Internal Auditor Exam. Students work on internal audits as part of class along with learning the latest internal audit techniques. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6382 (HMGT 6382) Advanced Internal Auditing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an in-depth view of issues related to internal audit. The course covers the current and emerging issues such as enterprise risk management, advanced communication techniques, managing the audit group, auditing outsourced functions, co-sourcing internal audit groups, working as an in charge auditor and quality assessment reviews. A semester long research project is completed by students. Case studies are discussed along with discussions with audit practitioners. Prerequisite: ACCT 6380 or HMGT 6380. (3-0) R

ACCT 6383 Fraud Examination (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces theory and techniques used in solving financial crimes including forensic accounting procedures, interviewing techniques, rules of evidence, sources of information, and current issues in financial investigations. The course will include application of criminal statutes related to investigating, solving, and prosecuting financial crimes. Case studies and practical exercises will be used to augment course topics. Various financial documents and instruments will be discussed and reviewed as part of the documentary evidence to support financial investigations. ACCT 3331 and ACCT 3332 will also be counted as prerequisites. Prerequisites: (ACCT 6330 and ACCT 6332) or equivalent. (3-0) S

ACCT 6384 (MIS 6339) Analytical Reviews Using Audit Software (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the theory and tools used to leverage automated auditing software such as ACL and IDEA. The course includes an analytical review of accounting and operational data for internal auditors and hands-on use of audit software and the development of an audit dashboard. The course also explores ways to leverage the enterprise technology and use available technology to monitor controls and detect fraud. (3-0) R

ACCT 6385 Managerial Accounting in Enterprise Systems (3 semester credit hours) This course will cover the complexity and functionality of managerial accounting systems within Enterprise Systems. Cost center accounting, profitability analysis, product costing, profit center accounting and reporting related to managerial decision-making will be covered. Use of SAP or similar software will be used to demonstrate concepts. ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 will also be counted as prerequisites. Prerequisite: (ACCT 6201 and ACCT 6202) or ACCT 6305. (3-0) R

ACCT 6386 Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC) (3 semester credit hours) GRC examines, from the perspective of corporate directors, senior officers, professional service providers, and consultants the relationship between Corporate Governance and selected components: risk management, compliance, regulations, and regulatory reporting. In addition, these will be linked to two other aspects of Corporate Governance: ethics and corporate culture. Experts in the field provide insights into how systems of corporate governance are designed, developed, and implemented. GRC benefits graduates interested in pursuing careers as auditors (external and internal), consultants, forensic accountants, risk management experts, compliance officers, and ethics officers. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6387 Executive Compensation and Shareholder Returns (3 semester credit hours) Covers issues related to executive compensation and its impact on shareholder wealth. Students review the history of executive compensation and the relationship of executive pay to average employee pay, as well as data on whether there is alignment between current compensation methods and shareholder returns. This will include study of the corporate scandals which led to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the proliferation of golden parachutes, pending legislation and regulations such as "say on pay" and increasing federal involvement in compensation issues, e.g. the appointment of a federal "pay czar" at the Department of the Treasury to manage executive salaries at companies receiving federal bailout money. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6388 Accounting Communications (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to improve accounting students' language and communication skills through lectures, discussions, readings, presentations, and assignments. Introduction to various types of professional accounting-related communication, both written and oral. Students apply effective communication skills in various assignments such as memos, emails, professional branding, proposals, presentations, and interviews. (3-0) S

ACCT 6389 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Practicum (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to expand and apply their tax compliance skills in a community service environment through the execution of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program through a combination of in-class seminars, out-of-classroom application, and a research project. ACCT 3350 or ACCT 3351 will also be counted as a prerequisite or corequisite. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 6350 or ACCT 6351. (3-0) R

ACCT 6391 (FIN 6391) Risk Accounting (3 semester credit hours) This course develops a framework for explaining the nature, uses, and financial reporting of derivatives. The course introduces the measurement of operational and financial risks and valuation of financial derivatives. Further analysis of the conceptual framework will be performed based on the extensive use of cases to allow students to create their own accounting interpretation of the hedging strategy. Prerequisites: (ACCT 3331 and ACCT 3332) or (ACCT 6330 and ACCT 6332) or Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ACCT 6V98 Accounting Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

ACCT 6V99 Special Topics in Accounting (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

ACCT 7313 Contemporary Research in Accounting and Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course will introduce analytical and empirical methods appropriate for addressing accounting questions in the capital markets arena. The emphasis will be to provide a foundation for research methods in accounting. Topics will include use of accounting information for valuation, value relevance, earnings management, accounting and audit as corporate mechanisms, and some anomalies. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

ACCT 7314 Empirical Research in Financial Reporting (3 semester credit hours) Presents current areas of research in the area of financial reporting. Emphasis is ongoing and recently completed research studies, including understanding of their antecedents and research methodologies. Capital market based empirical research topics will be covered. In particular, the role of analysts as financial information intermediaries will be examined. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

ACCT 7323 Empirical Research in Accounting and Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to further the ability of the students to critically analyze completed research efforts, to provide insight into how a given stream of research (e.g. earnings return association studies, trading volume) develops over time and to further the students' knowledge of academic accounting research in the area of financial accounting/reporting. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

ACCT 7324 Empirical Research in Financial Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Presents a detailed study of past and current empirical research in the areas of financial accounting and other related fields. Emphasis is on a clear understanding of hypothesis formulation, research design, sample selection and statistical techniques used in these studies. Topics include financial reporting, valuation, and analyst forecast. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

ACCT 7333 Analytical Research in Accounting and Economics (3 semester credit hours) Presents a detailed study of economics based analytical research in accounting. Emphasis is on a clear understanding of theoretical paradigms, modeling issues, interpretation of the results, and empirical applications of analytical models. Topics will include the role of information for valuation, contracting, and performance evaluation, and analysis of financial and non-financial performance measurement. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

ACCT 7334 Research Foundations in Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Presents a detailed study of economics based research in financial accounting reporting. Emphasis is on providing an understanding of the current research in capital market based financial accounting. This course provides a platform for supplementing and integrating the students' knowledge of basic research methods and tools and requires the students to identify an accounting topic that they are interested in and to write a research paper in that topic. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

ACCT 7343 Empirical Research in Managerial Accounting (3 semester credit hours) Presents a detailed study of empirical research in the area of managerial accounting. Emphasis in on providing an understanding of the current research in managerial accounting. Topics covered include managerial incentives, design of compensation contracts, performance measurement and cost management. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

ACCT 7344 Advanced Research in Accounting (3 semester credit hours) This course exposes the students to a wide range of empirical research methodologies including large sample archival research. Emphasis is on providing a clear understanding of the research methods including the theoretical aspects that underlie. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) T

Business Policy and Strategy

BPS 6151 Executive Study Trip - Americas (1 semester credit hour) Executive Education Course. This course focuses on economic and political strategy. Considers international business, political, and cultural issues for doing business globally. Instructor consent required. (1-0) Y

BPS 6251 Capstone: Integration Enterprise (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This 2-hour course will immerse the student in an initial examination and/or design of a substantial project within a corporation intended to raise corporate value by transforming the business. The emphasis will be on new uses of assets and resources, not the improved management of existing activities. This is intended to develop the executive capacity of the individual student. (2-0) Y

BPS 6253 Strategic Leadership (2 semester credit hours) Addresses the challenge of leading organizations in dynamic and challenging environments. Overall goal is to not only question one's assumptions about leadership, but also enhance skills and acquire new content knowledge. Topics include visionary and transformational leadership; post-heroic leadership; empowerment; leveraging and combining resources; designing organizations; and ethics. (2-0) Y

BPS 6254 Performance Transformation (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course provides students with a toolbox of strategy models to develop corporate strategies and implement corporate transformation. Instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

BPS 6255 Field Project (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Students work with a local business to understand and evaluate current corporate issues. Students develop a transformational strategy and present their findings to corporate sponsors and faculty. Prerequisites: BPS 6254 and instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

BPS 6256 C-Suite Leadership (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course explores the leadership of executive officers in influencing and implementing public policy; creating the public image of the firm; and corporate social responsibility. Instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

BPS 6302 Strategic Business Communications (3 semester credit hours) The ability to communicate clearly and persuasively is the hallmark of a successful leader. Students in this course will get hands-on experience working through communication challenges in a realistic and dynamic class setting, and will learn the importance of communication for problem solving and decision-making in business. Material emphasizes both written and oral presentation skills and the use of media/technology. For students in all business areas. (3-0) Y

BPS 6305 Ethical Issues in International Business (3 semester credit hours) Examines ethical concepts such as justice, equality, freedom, and responsibility as they relate to the functioning of an economic system. Specific problems facing the global business organization will be discussed from an ethical perspective. Articulation of management philosophy incorporating the ethical dimension. (3-0) S

BPS 6310 Strategic Management (3 semester credit hours) Strategic management consists of the analysis, decisions, and actions that organizations take to create sustainable competitive advantages. The course examines a variety of issues including environmental, competitor, and stakeholder analysis; strategy formulation; and strategy implementation and control. The central role of ethics and corporate governance as well as global issues will be addressed. Prerequisites: ((ACCT 6201 and ACCT 6202) or ACCT 6305) and FIN 6301 and MKT 6301 and OB 6301. (3-0) S

BPS 6311 Strategy Implementation (3 semester credit hours) Implementation issues of strategic planning. Topics include: planning system design, organizing for planning, situation analysis, and corporate/divisional relationships. Cases and selected readings illustrate the key planning concepts. Prerequisite: BPS 6210 or BPS 6310 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

BPS 6312 Advanced Multinational Business Seminar (3 semester credit hours) This seminar aims at the broadening of business strategy horizons to include the international dimension applied to topical business problems. It also responds to the recent findings of the US Management schools that precepts of corporate strategy for national markets are subject to many exceptions and require much supplementation when applied to multinational markets. This course also aims at providing support for the Dallas metroplex area business organizations for designing and implementing their strategies in general, multinational strategies in particular. This course will investigate topical and sector-based implementation problems derived from the participants' own companies or current business media. (3-0) T

BPS 6332 (SYSM 6320) Strategic Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Addresses the challenge of leading organizations in dynamic and challenging environments. Overall goal is to not only question one's assumptions about leadership, but also enhance skills and acquire new content knowledge. Topics include visionary and transformational leadership, post-heroic leadership, empowerment, leveraging and combining resources, designing organizations and ethics. (3-0) Y

BPS 6340 Accountability and Ethics in Corporate Governance (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the issues faced by top management teams and boards of directors, including compensation, investor relations, social responsibility, and accountability in the context of ethical strategic policy making. (3-0) S

BPS 6351 Business Transformation Project II (3 semester credit hours) This three hour course will immerse the student in an initial examination and/or design of a substantial project within a corporation intended to raise corporate value by transforming the business. The emphasis will be on new uses of assets and resources, not the improved management of existing activities. This is intended to develop the executive capacity of the individual student. Department consent required. (3-0) Y

BPS 6360 Management and Organizational Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 semester credit hours) Management consulting now accounts for more than $120 billion in global annual revenues. In addition to these full-time consultants, more and more employees are also in roles of a consultative nature, as the knowledge-intensive nature of work increases. This course will begin with a review of the theoretical foundations of the client-consultant relationship, drawing from counseling psychology and other disciplines, then broaden to cover theories of Organizational Behavior, Organizational Learning and Strategy. Through various workshops and hands-on exercises, participants will apply these theories in a number of scenarios relevant for consulting. Special attention will be given to prepare students to become confident practitioners, by bridging the theory-practice gap in the practice of management and organizational consulting. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) T

BPS 6379 Business Strategies for Sustainability (3 semester credit hours) The course introduces student to sustainable business practices. The role of legislation and its impact on business practices as well as proactive business strategies firms use to differentiate themselves and obtain a competitive advantage will also be addressed. By viewing a firm through an environmental lens, managers find opportunities to reduce risks, drive down costs, and create intangible value. Further, firms can build stronger connections with a broad range of stakeholders. (3-0) Y

BPS 6V99 Special Topics in Business Policy and Strategy (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

BPS 7300 Advanced Strategic Management Seminar I (3 semester credit hours) This is the first of a two-part series of PhD seminars in strategic management that (1) expose students to various theories and topics in strategic management research, and (2) train students to become informed researchers who will be able to contribute to this literature. This seminar covers the major theories in current research addressing strategy formulation and implementation. Prerequisite: OB 7300. (3-0) T

BPS 7301 Advanced Strategic Management Seminar II (3 semester credit hours) This is the second of the two-part series of PhD seminars in strategic management. Together the two seminars (1) expose students to various theories and topics in strategic management research, and (2) train students to become informed researchers who will be able to contribute to this literature. Seminar II focuses more on the empirical research in major topics such as strategic alliances, networks, competitive dynamics and knowledge management. Students learn to use the different theories introduced in the previous seminar as tools for analyzing strategic business phenomena. Prerequisite: BPS 7300. (3-0) Y

BPS 7302 Research Methodology (3 semester credit hours) The aim of this course is to lay the foundations for good empirical research in the social sciences and to introduce students to the assumptions and logic underlying social research. Students become acquainted with a variety of approaches to research design, and are helped to develop their own research projects and to evaluate the products of empirical research. (3-0) Y

BPS 7303 Doctoral Teaching and Writing Seminar (3 semester credit hours) Provides the tools necessary for beginning academics to think critically about teaching and writing to enable them to be successful researchers and effective teachers. Students will not only be exposed to research on effective writing and teaching, but will also work actively with classmates both within and across areas to improve their ability to write clearly and teach well. The course will require students to assess both their own writing and the writing of others. Students will practice putting together a syllabus, creating assignments for students, and presenting explanations of difficult concepts. (3-0) Y

BPS 7307 Management Scholarship (3 semester credit hours) As management scholars, why do we do what we do? What is it that we do? How do we do a better job? How do we make stronger contributions not only to academia but also to society? The short-run aim of this course is to familiarize PhD students with the various rules of the game associated with our profession. Its long-run aim is to enhance PhD students' odds for success as management scholars. Although designed primarily for PhD students, interested master's students can enroll. (3-0) T

Business Analytics

BUAN 6312 (MECO 6312) Applied Econometrics and Time Series Analysis (3 semester credit hours) A survey of techniques used in analyzing cross-sectional, time series and panel data with special emphasis on time series methods. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or SYSM 6303 or FIN 6306 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

BUAN 6320 (ACCT 6320 and MIS 6320 and OPRE 6393) Database Foundations (3 semester credit hours) The course provides database knowledge for non-MIS business students to function effectively in their functional area. The course covers conceptual data modeling with the entity-relationship diagram, the fundamentals of relational data model and database queries, and the basic concepts of data warehousing. Structured Query Language will be used extensively. Applications of databases for accounting, finance, marketing, and other areas of business will be emphasized. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Information Technology and Management. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6320 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6324 (MIS 6324 and OPRE 6399) Business Analytics With SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course covers theories and applications of business analytics. The focus is on extracting business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including (but not limited to) customer segmentation, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems, web mining, and product assortment. The emphasis is placed on the 'know-how' -- knowing how to extract and apply business analytics to improve business decision-making. Students will also acquire hands-on experience with business analytics software in the form of SAS Enterprise Miner. Credit cannot be received for both courses, BUAN 6324 and BUAN 6356. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6335 (SYSM 6335) Organizing for Business Analytics: A Systems Approach (3 semester credit hours) The course develops conceptual understanding of business analytics and key business drivers that lead to business initiatives. The course takes a systems and organizational approach and examines how decision-makers in key functional areas of an enterprise rely on business analytics, how they develop analytical techniques, and how key roles are played by business analytics professionals. The course also emphasizes developing the business case for analytics through defining and executing strategy and addresses how to successfully integrate analytical processes, technologies, and people in all aspects of business operations. (3-0) T

BUAN 6337 (MKT 6337) Marketing Predictive Analytics Using SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed for those interested in a career in marketing analytics. Students analyze data from large databases to make important marketing decisions. These methods are commonly employed in online marketing, grocery stores, and in financial markets. Students will acquire knowledge about the tools and software that are used to understand issues such as who the profitable customers are, how to acquire them, and how to retain them. The tools can also be used to manage brand prices and promotions using scanner data as is done in supermarkets. Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 or major in MS Business Analytics) and OPRE 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6345 (MIS 6345) High Performance Analytics (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of SAN HANA implementation modeling techniques and SAP data services. The course covers HANA architecture, graphic and SQL modeling tools in SAP HANA using text search and analysis, managing modeling content, security and authorizations, and using data services to bring data into SAP HANA as well as non-SAP, data warehouse concepts and sources. Students learn such concepts using hands-on exercises and practical assignments and the data services focused on bringing data into SAP HANA. Prerequisite: MIS 6309. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6346 (MIS 6346) Big Data Analytics (3 semester credit hours) The course covers topics including: (1) understanding of big data concepts, (2) manipulation of big data with popular tools, and (3) distributed analytics programming. The course is project-oriented, thus students are required to establish a big data environment, perform various analytics, and report on project findings. In addition to concepts and theoretical aspects, the course emphasizes on the actual operations of a big data system. Students manipulate the big data environment, use various dedicated big data tools, and perform distributed analytics programming with popular computer languages. Prerequisites: BUAN 6324 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6356 (MIS 6356) Business Analytics With R (3 semester credit hours) This course covers theories and applications of business analytics. The focus is on extracting business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including (but not limited to) customer segmentation, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems, web mining, and product assortment. The emphasis is placed on the 'know-how' -- knowing how to extract and apply business analytics to improve business decision-making. Students will also acquire hands-on experience with business analytics software in the form of R. Credit cannot be received for both courses, BUAN 6324 and BUAN 6356. (3-0) Y

BUAN 6390 Analytics Practicum (3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves analytics skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. Student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. (3-0) S

BUAN 6398 (OPRE 6398) Prescriptive Analytics (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to decision analysis and optimization techniques. Topics include linear programming, decision analysis, integer programming, and other optimization models. Applications of these models to business problems will be emphasized. (3-0) S

BUAN 6V98 Business Analytics Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

Energy Management

ENGY 6330 Energy Law and Contracts (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an introductory overview of U.S. and international energy laws that govern oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, renewable energy and electric generation. The course covers the history of energy regulation and explores current laws governing the use, production, and transmission of energy sources, as well as environmental regulations. (3-0) S

ENGY 6331 Capstone Project in Energy (3 semester credit hours) Capstone projects are experiential learnings sponsored by local industries and provide the students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained in core courses to solve real world challenging problems or simulated projects in the area of energy management. Students work in a team environment, interact with industry leaders and gain some industry specific knowledge. Prerequisites: FIN 6335 and FIN 6336 and MECO 6318 and OPRE 6389. (3-0) Y

ENGY 6336 (FIN 6336) Energy Accounting and Taxation (3 semester credit hours) This course explores and discusses the special accounting rules for the energy industries and their special tax treatment. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305. (3-0) T

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

ENTP 6311 (FIN 6311) Valuation Models and Practices (3 semester credit hours) This course examines different models and practices for valuing firms (both public and private), pricing IPOs, and valuing and structuring mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) S

ENTP 6315 (FIN 6315) Entrepreneurial Finance (3 semester credit hours) The objective of this course is to build skills and knowledge in the financing of entrepreneurial ventures. Entrepreneurial Finance concerns not only the process of financing and investing in start-up companies, but also the changes to the initial financing mix that may be required as start-up companies mature and grow. Topics include: valuation, capital structure, forecasting, the markets for venture capital and private equity, the decision to go public or remain private, alternative financing arrangements, and the differential marketability and liquidity of the securities used to finance non-public firms. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6315 and FIN 6315. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6316 (FIN 6316) Private Equity Finance (3 semester credit hours) This course will cover the investment of capital in the equity of private companies to fund growth or in public companies to take them private. This course includes the study of a broad spectrum of private equity investments, investing in established private firms, buyouts, financial restructuring of distressed firms, and private equity financing by public firms. Prerequisite: FIN 6311 or ENTP 6311 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6351 International Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course is an introduction to the international business plan and provides an introduction to entrepreneurship with an emphasis on identifying, evaluating and developing new venture opportunities for international markets. Topics include opportunity identification and evaluation, startup strategies, business valuation, business plan development, financing the venture, managing the growing business and exit strategies. Prerequisites: (IMS 5200 or MKT 6301 or FIN 6301 or ACCT 6201) and BPS 6310 and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6352 International Business Plan (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course is a capstone that requires the development of a comprehensive business plan for market entry into a foreign country or region. The construct builds upon the core business and international coursework including the successful completion of key courses in accounting, finance, marketing and strategy, as well as, the international entrepreneurship and innovation. The course consists of lectures, research, and faculty coaching and guidance. Prerequisite: ENTP 6351 and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6360 Startup Launch I (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to refine and validate a specific business concept based upon a student's new venture idea. The course utilizes a structured customer discovery/validation methodology that requires early customer engagement and the development and validation of a comprehensive business model. Key assumptions will be validated utilizing primary and secondary market research, interviews with prospective customers and other industry participants, and field testing of Minimum Viable Products. Students or student teams will be selected and enrolled on the basis of a business concept proposal approved by the faculty. Multiple projects will proceed through the course as a cohort, guided by faculty and mentored by experienced entrepreneurs. Cubicle space in the Venture Development Center may be applied for. ENTP 6360 utilizes the same customer discovery/validation process used in ENTP 6365. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6360 and ENTP 6365. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6361 Startup Launch II (3 semester credit hours) Faculty mentored development of a business concept initiated in ENTP 6360. Prerequisites: ENTP 6360 and instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6362 Startup Launch III-IV (3 semester credit hours) Faculty mentored development of a business concept initiated in ENTP 6360. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum for students in the Startup Launch track). Prerequisites: ENTP 6361 and instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6365 Business Concept Validation (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to refine and validate a specific business concept based upon a UT Dallas technology currently resident in the Venture Development Center (VDC) or developed by an external organization. The course utilizes a structured customer discovery/validation methodology that requires early customer engagement and the development and validation of a comprehensive business model. Key assumptions will be validated utilizing primary and secondary market research, interviews with prospective customers and other industry participants, and field testing of Minimum Viable Products. Student teams will be selected and assigned to a project based on relevant experience and qualifications. Multiple projects will proceed through the course as a cohort, guided by the faculty and the inventor/researcher. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). ENTP 6365 utilizes the same customer discovery/validation process used in ENTP 6360. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6360 and ENTP 6365. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6370 Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an introduction to entrepreneurship, with an emphasis on identifying, evaluating and developing new venture opportunities. Topics include opportunity identification and evaluation, startup strategies, business valuation, business plan development, attracting stakeholders, financing the venture, managing the growing business and exit strategies. Case studies and guest lectures by entrepreneurs and venture capital partners provide a real-world perspective. The major deliverable of this course is an early stage feasibility analysis of a venture of the student's choosing. (3-0) S

ENTP 6375 (SYSM 6332) Technology and New Product Development (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the strategic and organizational issues confronted by firms in technology-intensive environments. The course reflects six broad themes: (1) managing firms in technology-intensive industries; (2) forecasting key industry and technology trends; (3) linking technology and business strategies; (4) using technology as a source of competitive advantage; (5) organizing firms to achieve these goals; and (6) implementing new technologies in organizations. Students will analyze actual situations in organizations and summarize their findings and recommendations in an in-depth term paper. Case studies and class participation are stressed. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6378 Managing the Emerging Enterprise (3 semester credit hours) The course focuses on the challenges of growing a small company from early startup to a professionally managed business, as the entrepreneur struggles to maintain the entrepreneurial spirit of the firm while introducing the professional management disciplines essential to sustained and profitable growth. Topics include shaping and communicating the entrepreneur's vision, developing a viable business model, positioning products and services in a broader market, implementing business strategies, building an organization and infrastructure, molding the culture, developing and managing critical relationships with banks, suppliers and customers, and managing growth with limited resources. The course makes extensive use of case studies and visiting lectures by entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: ENTP 6370 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6380 (MKT 6380) Market Entry Strategies (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the marketing challenges facing the entrepreneurial firm, with specific emphasis on the choice and implementation of an initial market entry strategy. This choice typically involves multiple decisions, each based on critical assumptions about customers, markets and competitors. Early validation of these key assumptions is an essential element of the strategic decision process. Topics include understanding the context and the customer, developing and validating the business concept, defining the product/service offering and customer value proposition, positioning, creating awareness, and developing and implementing the market entry strategy. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6380 and MKT 6380. Prerequisite: ENTP 6370 or MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6382 (MKT 6382) Professional Selling I (3 semester credit hours) Examines the theory and practical application of the principles and art of professional selling. The course places special emphasis on mapping the sales process for new companies and new products. The course includes case studies and learning by doing live case instruction. This course also includes advanced concepts in sales such as major account acquisition, government markets, global markets, request for information, request for proposal, product line sales, adaptive product and service solutions, team selling, long sales cycles, prospecting and networking strategies, implementation and analysis of prospecting strategies, and sales management strategies for the early stage of the product lifecycle. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6388 (SYSM 6316) Managing Innovation within the Corporation (3 semester credit hours) Innovators and entrepreneurs within established corporations combine innovation, creativity and leadership to develop and launch new products, new product lines and new business units that grow revenues and profits from within. The course seeks to equip students with the skills and perspectives required to initiate new ventures and create viable businesses in dynamic and uncertain environments in the face of organizational inertia and other sources of resistance to innovation. Course topics include the elements of strategic analysis and positioning for competitive advantage in dynamic markets, and the structuring, utilization and mobilization of the internal resources of existing firms in the pursuit of growth and new market opportunities. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6390 Business Model Innovation (3 semester credit hours) Business model innovation is a logical and internally consistent approach to the design and operations of a new venture, capturing the essence of how the business will be focused and providing a concise representation of how an interrelated set of decision variables will be addressed to create sustainable competitive advantage. This course will explore the range and diversity of existing business models and the analytical tools essential to their understanding, define a logical and internally consistent approach to the choice or development of an appropriate business model for a new enterprise, and demonstrate the application of these tools and techniques through case studies and exercises. Prerequisite: ENTP 6370 or instructor consent required. (3-0) S

ENTP 6392 Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector (3 semester credit hours) This course will explore the role and importance of the non-profit sector and the unique place it occupies in twenty-first century life. The course will develop theoretical and conceptual frameworks appropriate for understanding the processes and challenges of non-profit ventures in the social sector. Student teams will work with selected non-profits in the local community, focusing on the issues and challenges of mission definition, service delivery, business practices, fund-raising and governance. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6394 Managing Innovation (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Achieving innovation is not something that a manager can simply decide to do. By nature, organizations impose constraints on innovative behavior and innovative thinking must permeate the organization. This course is organized around topics such as, a) the nature of individual creativity and organizational innovation, b) the key processes of entrepreneurial innovation, c) the barriers and constraints that resist innovation in most organizations, d) the role of design thinking in organizational innovation and, e) the organizational processes and leadership skills required to stimulate and sustain organizational innovation. (3-0) Y

ENTP 6395 Seminar - Topics in Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3 semester credit hours) This course will explore special topics of interest to students of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The content will vary, exploring such topics as opportunities for innovation in Biotechnology, Information Technology, Nanotechnology, and other fields. Extensive use of outside speakers, special readings, and field and library research will be involved. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6398 (SYSM 6315) The Entrepreneurial Experience (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to provide student teams with practical experience in the investigation, evaluation and recommendation of technology and/or market entry strategies for a significant new business opportunity. Projects will be defined by the faculty and will generally focus on emerging market opportunities defined by new technologies of interest to a sponsoring corporate partner. Teams will be comprised of management and engineering graduate students, mentored by faculty and representatives of the partnering company. Evaluation will be based on papers, presentations and other deliverables defined on a case-by-case basis. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

ENTP 6V97 Innovation and Entrepreneurship Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student will gain experience and improve skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

ENTP 6V99 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) R

Finance

FIN 6252 Creating Value through Mergers, Acquisitions and Private Equity (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Explores strategic financial management of the firm. Considers creation of value using mergers, acquisitions and private capital. Prerequisites: FIN 6301 and instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

FIN 6300 Personal Finance (3 semester credit hours) Examination of personal financial management issues and planning techniques. Provides a consumer-side view of credit management, budgeting, personal financial statement analysis, insurance planning, retirement planning, investment planning, asset accumulation and distribution planning, tax planning, estate planning and employee benefits planning. May not be used to fulfill requirements for Master of Science in Finance degree. (3-0) Y

FIN 6301 (SYSM 6312) Financial Management (3 semester credit hours) Develops the basic concepts of finance with particular attention to their application to the financial management of companies. Prerequisites or Corequisites: OPRE 6301 and (ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305). (3-0) S

FIN 6306 Quantitative Methods in Finance (3 semester credit hours) The objective of this course is to develop students' ability to use quantitative methods in financial decision-making. Particular attention is paid to the quantitative topics covered in the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) and Financial Risk Manager (FRM) exams. Prerequisites: FIN 6301 and (OPRE 6303 or equivalent). (3-0) S

FIN 6308 Regulation of Business and Financial Markets (3 semester credit hours) The objective of this course is to develop a student's understanding of the laws and regulations which govern businesses and financial markets. In addition, this course considers the ethical issues that financial analysts and financial planners face. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) Y

FIN 6310 Investment Management (3 semester credit hours) The course is intended to provide an understanding of the role of modern financial theory in portfolio management and to present a framework for addressing current issues in the management of financial assets. Topics to be covered during the semester include trading, valuation, active portfolio management, asset allocation, global diversification, performance measurement, financial derivatives and fixed income securities. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6306. (3-0) S

FIN 6311 (ENTP 6311) Valuation Models and Practices (3 semester credit hours) This course examines different models and practices for valuing firms (both public and private), pricing IPOs, and valuing and structuring mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) S

FIN 6314 Fixed Income Securities (3 semester credit hours) Examines fixed income securities, their derivatives, and the management of fixed income portfolios. Prerequisite: FIN 6306. (3-0) Y

FIN 6315 (ENTP 6315) Entrepreneurial Finance (3 semester credit hours) The objective of this course is to build skills and knowledge in the financing of entrepreneurial ventures. Entrepreneurial Finance concerns not only the process of financing and investing in start-up companies, but also the changes to the initial financing mix that may be required as start-up companies mature and grow. Topics include: valuation, capital structure, forecasting, the markets for venture capital and private equity, the decision to go public or remain private, alternative financing arrangements, and the differential marketability and liquidity of the securities used to finance non-public firms. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6315 and FIN 6315. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) Y

FIN 6316 (ENTP 6316) Private Equity Finance (3 semester credit hours) This course will cover the investment of capital in the equity of private companies to fund growth or in public companies to take them private. This course includes the study of a broad spectrum of private equity investments, investing in established private firms, buyouts, financial restructuring of distressed firms, and private equity financing by public firms. Prerequisite: FIN 6311 or ENTP 6311 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6321 (REAL 6321) Introduction to Real Estate (3 semester credit hours) Overview of various aspects of real estate markets, including marketing, finance, taxation, development, law, appraisal, investment, valuation and real estate participants. (3-0) S

FIN 6322 (REAL 6322) Real Estate Finance and Investment (3 semester credit hours) This course covers commercial real estate investment analysis and instruments used in its finance. Topics include: real estate valuation, loan structures, syndication, securitization, and developments in capital markets affecting real estate developments. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) S

FIN 6323 (REAL 6323) Real Estate Market Analysis and Investment (3 semester credit hours) This course provides insight into market analysis and research including local and economic base analysis with case studies on specific commercial investment property types. This course also applies modern technologies to assist in performing these analyses. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6321 or REAL 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6322. (3-0) Y

FIN 6324 (REAL 6324) Real Estate Development (3 semester credit hours) An in depth course covering issues faced in the development process including market analysis, government approvals, financing and risk assessment. Prerequisite: FIN 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6321 or REAL 6322. (3-0) R

FIN 6325 Macroeconomics and Financial Markets (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the relationship between macroeconomics and financial markets, and how they influence one another. Prerequisite: FIN 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6326 (REAL 6326) Real Estate Law and Contracts (3 semester credit hours) Study of the legal principles governing real estate transactions, with an emphasis on promulgated contracts. Topics include contract law, tax law, leases, estates in land, types of ownership, deeds, mortgages, title insurance, agency and homestead. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6321 or REAL 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6322. (3-0) Y

FIN 6328 (REAL 6328) Real Estate Valuation (3 semester credit hours) This capstone real estate course provides an in-depth study, application and evaluation of the theory and methods of residential and commercial property valuation and appraisal. Topics include the three major approaches to appraising real estate, regression analysis, market analysis, highest and best use analysis and capitalization techniques, with an emphasis on income properties. Several cases and problems are presented and solved. Prerequisite: FIN 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6321 or REAL 6322. (3-0) R

FIN 6330 Behavioral Finance (3 semester credit hours) This course describes how individuals and firms make financial decisions, how those decisions might deviate from those predicted by traditional financial or economic theory and the consequences of these deviations for financial markets. The course examines how the insights of behavioral finance complement the traditional finance paradigm. Students will gain an understanding of how individuals actually make financial decisions (descriptive) and guidance on how to improve financial decision-making (prescriptive) in themselves and others. Prerequisite: FIN 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 6335 Energy Finance (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the issues associated with investing in and financing energy projects as well as managing energy risks. Case studies are drawn from the oil, natural gas, electricity and renewables sectors. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) R

FIN 6336 (ENGY 6336) Energy Accounting and Taxation (3 semester credit hours) This course explores and discusses the special accounting rules for the energy industries and their special tax treatment. Prerequisite: ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305. (3-0) T

FIN 6340 Management of Financial Institutions (3 semester credit hours) Study of the financial management of commercial banks and other financial intermediaries, with special attention to risk management issues. Prerequisite: FIN 6325 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6341 Energy Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the special issues associated with energy risk management, from hedging oil price risk to weather risk. Prerequisite: FIN 6360 or FIN 6381 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 6342 Insurance and Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Study of risk management techniques for individuals and enterprises with an emphasis on insurance. Topics include life insurance, property and casualty insurance, liability insurance, disability insurance, health insurance, employer-based group insurance, long-term care insurance, worker's compensation, and governmental benefit programs. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) R

FIN 6350 Advanced Financial Management (3 semester credit hours) Advanced analysis of topics in financial management. Capital structure, dividend policy, incentives, and risk management. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) S

FIN 6351 Strategic Financial Management and Valuation II (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This is a second level finance course stressing the linkages of corporate strategy, financial strategy and market valuation. Different methodologies of valuation will be covered. Department consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6352 Financial Modeling (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on financial modeling using computer software (spreadsheet, etc.) and their uses in financial decision making. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) Y

FIN 6355 Corporate Finance and Policy (3 semester credit hours) Cases involving financial situations encountered by managers that require the application of financial management skills. Special emphasis is placed on strategy. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6350. (3-0) R

FIN 6356 Mergers and Acquisitions (3 semester credit hours) Examines mergers and acquisitions paying particular attention to how they are structured, valued, and financed. Prerequisite: FIN 6311 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 6357 Corporate Restructuring and Turnarounds (3 semester credit hours) Examines the issues and strategies associated with restructuring a corporation to turn it around, either when in distress or in bankruptcy. Prerequisite: FIN 6311 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 6360 Options and Futures Markets (3 semester credit hours) Examines the valuation of derivative securities such as options and futures contracts, as well as the use of these instruments in managing business and financial risks. The topics to be covered include pricing of futures contracts, swaps, and options, the use of derivative instruments in hedging, portfolio insurance, exotic options, and the valuation of options on debt instruments. Prerequisite: FIN 6306. (3-0) Y

FIN 6364 Advanced Investment Management (3 semester credit hours) This course builds on the basic ideas underlying portfolio optimization covered in FIN 6301 and FIN 6310. It emphasizes the application of modern portfolio theory using quantitative methods. At the completion of this course, students will be able to analyze market data using the latest investment management tools, to formulate theoretical models, and to implement appropriate investment strategies. Prerequisite: FIN 6310. (3-0) T

FIN 6366 International Financial Management (3 semester credit hours) Study of world financial markets and institutions, foreign exchange exposure and management, foreign direct investment, and a variety of issues involved in the financial management of multinational firms. Credit cannot be received for both courses, FIN 6366 and IMS 6320. Note: IMS 6320 may not be used to fulfill degree requirements for MS in Finance. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) T

FIN 6368 Financial Information and Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the different sources of financial data, their management and their use in investment analysis, trading and in solving financial problems. Prerequisite: FIN 6306. (3-0) T

FIN 6370 The Theory of Finance and Its Applications (3 semester credit hours) A survey of financial theories and their application to various financial decisions and issues. Topics will include the theory of portfolio choices, asset pricing, derivative pricing, asymmetric information theories, and firm financing issues. Prerequisite: FIN 6310 or FIN 6350 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6380 Global Fund Management (3 semester credit hours) For students involved in the practice of managing a fund of global investments. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: FIN 6310 and instructor consent required. (3-0) S

FIN 6381 Introductory Mathematical Finance (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the mathematical methods of continuous time finance (Ito calculus, stochastic dynamic optimization, etc.). Prerequisite: OPRE 7310 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 6382 Numerical and Statistical Methods in Finance (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the use of numerical and statistical methods in various financial applications. Prerequisite: FIN 6360 or FIN 6381 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 6383 Financial Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Study of financial risk management and its applications. Prerequisite: FIN 6360 or FIN 6381 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 6385 Enterprise Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) The course explains the enterprise risk management in all of its various dimensions and how it is used to increase firm value. Prerequisite: FIN 6360 or FIN 6381 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

FIN 6390 Futures and Options Trading (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed for students involved in the practice of trading futures and options and managing an investment portfolio containing such financial instruments. Prerequisites: FIN 6360 and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6391 (ACCT 6391) Risk Accounting (3 semester credit hours) This course develops a framework for explaining the nature, uses, and financial reporting of derivatives. The course introduces the measurement of operational and financial risks and valuation of financial derivatives. Further analysis of the conceptual framework will be performed based on the extensive use of cases to allow students to create their own accounting interpretation of the hedging strategy. Prerequisites: (ACCT 3331 and ACCT 3332) or (ACCT 6330 and ACCT 6332) or Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

FIN 6V98 Finance Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

FIN 6V99 Special Topics in Finance (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

FIN 7310 Seminar in Contemporary Finance (3 semester credit hours) Issues in current financial research. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (15 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 7330 Topics in Theoretical Asset Pricing (3 semester credit hours) Advanced studies in the theory of asset pricing. Provides a foundation for advanced research in financial theory and empirical tests of asset pricing models. Topics include utility theory, mean-variance portfolio analysis, state preference models, continuous time portfolio selection, and the term structure of interest rates. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: (MECO 6345 or equivalent) and instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 7335 Topics in Empirical Asset Pricing (3 semester credit hours) Study of the methods used to empirically test asset pricing theories and/or models. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites or Corequisites: FIN 7330 and instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 7340 Topics in Theoretical Corporate Finance (3 semester credit hours) Empirical and theoretical analysis of corporate financial decision-making. Topics include the theory of the firm, initial public offerings, ownership and control, managerial incentives, risk management, and financing and investment decisions. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: (MECO 6345 or equivalent) and instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 7345 Topics in Empirical Corporate Finance (3 semester credit hours) Study of the methods used to empirically test corporate finance theories and/or models. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 7340 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

FIN 7375 Finance Workshop (3 semester credit hours) Forum for faculty and students to present recent developments in the finance literature. Presentation and discussion of published and unpublished papers of researchers with various affiliations. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (15 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

Healthcare Administration

HMGT 6320 The American Healthcare System (3 semester credit hours) Examines the structure, financing and operation of the US healthcare industry. It analyzes how priorities are established, how services are organized and delivered, factors that influence the cost, quality and availability of healthcare, and opposing positions on the future of healthcare reform. (3-0) T

HMGT 6321 Strategic Leadership of Healthcare Organizations (3 semester credit hours) Explores how healthcare organizations can create sustainable competitive advantage in a volatile, reimbursement driven industry. Topics include external and internal environmental analysis, strategy formulation, organizational design and control, and the impact of mergers and alliances on industry performance. Healthcare case studies are used to illustrate key concepts. Prerequisite: HMGT 6320. (3-0) S

HMGT 6322 Healthcare Cost Management and Control (3 semester credit hours) Examines how healthcare organizations allocate and report costs and use that information for managerial decision-making. Additional topics include how activity based costing can be used to more accurately determine the true cost of medical services and the use of the balanced scorecard to manage the conflicting imperatives of controlling costs and improving care. Prerequisite: ACCT 6305 (3-0) T

HMGT 6323 (MIS 6317) Healthcare Informatics (3 semester credit hours) Examines the unique challenges of clinical and patient care delivery in the healthcare industry, including the role of data management, emerging data standards and information technology in improving the quality and cost associated with healthcare. The focus of the course will be on healthcare IT including issues related to governance, data integration, and selection and management of healthcare IT. Credit cannot be received for both courses, HMGT 6323 and MIS 6317. (3-0) T

HMGT 6324 (MECO 6352 and OB 6332 and SYSM 6313) Healthcare Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6325 (OPRE 6325) Healthcare Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) Explores how effectively managing and continuously improving the end-to-end heal care supply chain provides a competitive advantage. Topics include supply chain fundamentals, key players in the health care supply chain and their challenges, how the health care supply chain works, impact of technology on supply chain performance, and lean six sigma methodology. Simulations and case studies will reinforce the learning. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6327 Electronic Health Records Applications (3 semester credit hours) An interactive, experiential course in which students will utilize hands-on, practice-oriented opportunities to learn the core components of clinical information systems used by major health care systems in the United States. The course will include a lab-based component in which students will follow guided exercises and assignments using a leading EMR software as well as case analyses. Prerequisite: HMGT 6323. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6329 Seminar in Healthcare Management (3 semester credit hours) This course features guest lecturers from the healthcare community giving students insight into many diverse career fields. Speakers will offer advice about career preparation, job interviewing, and important skills needed for success. Interaction with the speakers offers a valuable networking experience and an opportunity for mentoring advice. Employment opportunities discussed have included hospital administration, home health agencies, medical group practice, dental practices, governmental agencies, and consulting firms. Prerequisite: HMGT 6320. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6330 Healthcare Law, Policy and Regulation (3 semester credit hours) This course examines how healthcare laws and regulations are enacted, and their impact on providers, payers, and patients. Topics include: Stark prohibitions on provider self-referral, federal regulation of fraud and abuse, the Emergency Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA). It also examines the process by which Congressional legislation is transformed into day-to-day industry regulation. Prerequisite: HMGT 6320. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6331 Healthcare Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course applies the tools of economic analysis to the challenges and opportunities faced by managers and policy makers in the health sector. Topics covered include: measuring the benefits of healthcare, the role of insurance in spreading risk and altering incentives, the production of healthcare, price and non-price competition among providers, international comparisons of healthcare systems, and proposed policies that are intended to expand access and contain cost. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6332 Quality Improvement in Healthcare: Six Sigma and Beyond (3 semester credit hours) The course will explore applications of quality improvement measures to the healthcare environment. Applications including the Demming method, QI, and CQI will be studied. Application of other industrial quality improvement methodology including Six Sigma and Toyota Lean will be covered. Prerequisite: HMGT 6320. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6333 Ethics in Healthcare Management (3 semester credit hours) This course explores ethical issues specific to the healthcare industry including: fraud and abuse, rationing, uninsured treatment, the role of government, and end of life decisions. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6334 Healthcare Analytics (3 semester credit hours) The healthcare industry is yet to find ways to make best use of existing data to improve care, reduce costs, and provide more accessible care. This course introduces the use of business intelligence and decision sciences in healthcare industry. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of data mining techniques and decision analysis and hands-on experience with several analytics software which may include coding in R, Rattle, and WEKA (as needed and depending on availability). Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or SYSM 6303. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6336 (ACCT 6336 and MIS 6337) Information Technology Audit and Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Management's role in designing and controlling information technology used to process data is studied. Topics include the role of internal and external auditors in systems development, information security, business continuity, information technology, internet, change management, and operations. Focus is placed on the assurance of controls over information technology risks and covers topics directly related to the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6340 Principles of Hospital Administration (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the organization and management of modern US hospitals, hospital systems, and integrated healthcare systems. Case studies of leading healthcare organizations will be employed and students will address managerial challenges of future healthcare reform. Prerequisites: HMGT 6320 and HMGT 6321 and HMGT 6323 and HMGT 6330. (3-0) S

HMGT 6380 (ACCT 6380) Internal Audit (3 semester credit hours) The course covers internal audit from a broad perspective that includes information technology, business processes, and accounting systems. Topics include internal auditing standards, risk assessment, governance, ethics, audit techniques, consulting and emerging internal audit issues. This is the first course leading to Internal Auditing Education Partnership (IAEP) Certificate and prepares students for the Certified Internal Auditor Exam. Students work on internal audits as part of class along with learning the latest internal audit techniques. (3-0) Y

HMGT 6382 (ACCT 6382) Advanced Internal Auditing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an in-depth view of issues related to internal audit. The course covers the current and emerging issues such as enterprise risk management, advanced communication techniques, managing the audit group, auditing outsourced functions, co-sourcing internal audit groups, working as an in charge auditor and quality assessment reviews. A semester long research project is completed by students. Case studies are discussed along with discussions with audit practitioners. Prerequisite: ACCT 6380 or HMGT 6380. (3-0) R

HMGT 6401 Negotiation and Conflict Management in Healthcare (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops the critical negotiating skills needed to increase personal influence and effectiveness. Topics include recognizing and leveraging sources of power in a negotiation, identifying the opposing party's interests as distinct from their position, and negotiating effectively against a stronger opponent. (4-0) T

HMGT 6402 Financial Management of Healthcare Organizations (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops the critical ability to make financial decisions that reduce risk and create economic value. Topics include how to analyze and interpret healthcare financial statements, using discounted cash flow analysis to financially evaluate major spending and investment decisions, and how to financially evaluate a proposed healthcare acquisition, partnership or joint venture. (4-0) T

HMGT 6403 Medical Cost and Performance Management (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops powerful tools to measure and control healthcare costs and improve operating performance. Topics include identifying and controlling key cost drivers in a medical practice, determining the true cost of individual medical services, and using flexible budgeting and cost variance analysis to effectively control spending. (4-0) T

HMGT 6404 Quality and Performance Improvement in Healthcare (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops the knowledge and skills needed to improve the quality of both clinical and patient service processes. Topics include how to increase patient safety and create a patient-centric service culture, evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of existing clinical processes, and identify and eliminate redundancy, bottlenecks and non-value added activities in key service processes. (4-0) T

HMGT 6405 Healthcare Information Management and Technology (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Analyzes how clinical and administrative data is collected, organized, distributed, and used in medical decision-making. Topics include big data and the future of health analytics, the major obstacles to effectively using clinical data to create value, and the physician's role in healthcare data design and governance. (4-0) T

HMGT 6406 Strategic Management of Healthcare Organizations (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops the strategic thinking skills needed to create a sustainable competitive advantage. Topics include how to critically assess a healthcare organization's competitive environment and internal strengths and weaknesses, using value chain analysis to strategically position a medical practice, and identifying a set of medical services that offers a unique patient value. (4-0) T

HMGT 6407 Healthcare Policy and Regulation (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This class meets in Washington, D.C., where physicians meet with key legislators, lobbyists, and administrators to study the complex process by which healthcare legislation makes its way through Congress, explore the role of lobbyists and the media in shaping Congressional and public opinion on health policy issues, and learn how the administrative bureaucracy transforms legislation into statutory law. (4-0) T

HMGT 6408 Competencies of Effective Physician Leaders (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops the key skills and competencies that physician leaders need to be successful in their leadership role. Topics include how emotional intelligence and motivational needs influence leadership success, making effective use of the levers of power and personal influence, and communicating a vision and motivating people. (4-0) T

HMGT 6410 Leading in Complex Organizations (4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Analyzes the structural design, decision hierarchy, and organizational culture of complex contemporary healthcare organizations. Topics include re-designing organizational structure to improve physician performance, leading change through the use of adaptive leadership practices, and building coalitions and managing internal conflict. (4-0) T

HMGT 6V10 Special Topics in Healthcare Management (1-3 semester credit hours) Issues in current Healthcare Management. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). ([1-3]-0) Y

HMGT 6V15 Self-Directed Field Study (1-4 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. A self-directed, faculty supervised field study of the participant's practice or medical organization using the knowledge and skills acquired in the residential program. This course is non-residential. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (4 semester credit hours maximum). Department consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

HMGT 6V98 Healthcare Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

HMGT 6V99 Special Topics in Healthcare Management (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent is required. ([1-4]-0) S

International Management Studies

IMS 6091 Regional Area Studies: Latin America (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Latin America and their place in the world economy. (9-0) Y

IMS 6092 Regional Area Studies: Western Europe (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Western Europe and their place in the world economy. (3-0) Y

IMS 6093 Regional Area Studies: Asia (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Asia and their place in the world economy. (3-0) Y

IMS 6094 Regional Area Studies: Africa (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Africa and their place in the world economy. (9-0) Y

IMS 6095 Regional Area Studies: North America (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in North America and their place in the world economy. (3-0) Y

IMS 6096 Regional Area Studies: Eastern Europe (0 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in North America and their place in the world economy. (3-0) Y

IMS 6151 Global Business Ethics (1 semester credit hour) This course examines practical issues in global business ethics, including compliance requirements and their application, effective reactions to global ethical dilemmas and best practices in global and multicultural environments. (1-0) Y

IMS 6204 Global Business (2 semester credit hours) Provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of international business, covering macro-level environmental factors that affect international business today. Topics include globalization, country environments, culture, international trade and investment, regional economic integration, and the global monetary system. (2-0) S

IMS 6205 Export Market Planning (2 semester credit hours) A combination of lectures on the foundations of export marketing, combined with classroom presentations by experts from the North Texas District Export Council on their work in the global marketplace. Covers choosing an exportable product and market, and adapting marketing mix variables in the context of export marketing. Students prepare and present a market entry report, and are awarded a certificate from the US Department of Commerce upon completion. (2-0) R

IMS 6212 Global Communication and Negotiations (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course focuses on understanding national culture and cultural issues in international business. It emphasizes the importance of managing cultural differences to enhance communication, negotiation, leadership, and group dynamics in an international work environment. (2-0) Y

IMS 6213 Global Politics in Business (2 semester credit hours) Politics is a common challenge for multinational companies. This course will provide a comprehensive study of global business and politics. It examines regulatory compliance, ideology, government policies, ethical conflicts, environmental and resource issues at a global level. (2-0) Y

IMS 6214 Global Mergers and Acquisitions (2 semester credit hours) This course will examine mergers and acquisitions in the global scale, including identifying targets; valuing the targets; negotiating the deals, and structuring the post-deal integration. It will also cover the legal, organizational and strategic issues that impact the acquisition process. (2-0) Y

IMS 6250 Executive Study Trip - Mexico (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course focuses on NAFTA and the business, political, and cultural issues related to conducting business in Mexico. It involves a trip to an important business center where students visit companies, participate in classes at Mexican universities, and have cultural experiences pertinent to business decision-making and management in Mexico. Instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

IMS 6252 International Business Management (2 semester credit hours) Considers the role of general managers (CEO and country/regional managers) in multi-national companies and the working relationship of subsidiary and home offices in such companies. Topics include business strategies, control/cooperative systems, the dynamics of addressing local and global concerns, and knowledge transfer. Changes brought about by modern information technology are also considered. (2-0) Y

IMS 6253 Cross-Cultural Management (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education. This course focuses on understanding national culture and cultural issues in international business. It emphasizes the importance of managing regional cultural differences to enhance communication, negotiation, leadership, and group dynamics in an international or global work environment. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (2-0) Y

IMS 6300 The Multinational Firm (3 semester credit hours) Examines how multinational firms adapt to the international environment. Topics include the management of human resources, finance and the supply chain within the multinational firm. Special attention is given to the strategy and structure of multinational operations. Prerequisite: IMS 6204. (2-0) Y

IMS 6302 Legal Aspects of International Business Transactions (3 semester credit hours) The legal environment and framework of international business, legal aspects and implications of international trade and the establishment and operation of business abroad, moving goods across national borders, immigration, joint ventures, licensing, setting up and financing operations abroad, negotiating an international deal, resolving disputes, international corruption, bribery and crime. Prerequisite: IMS 6204 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

IMS 6310 International Marketing (3 semester credit hours) This course aims at preparing students to appreciate the international marketing by understanding both theoretical and practical issues involved. This course covers the fundamentals and evolution of international marketing, the environment of international marketing, foreign entry methods, evaluation of market potential, management of international marketing mix, consumer behavior and international strategic marketing planning. Students will also learn the reasons why international marketing is important for success in international business and for finding personal career opportunities. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6312 International Advertising (3 semester credit hours) This course will aim at preparing the students to understand theoretical and practical aspects of international advertising within the context of global marketing communications. The basic principles of the course will include global versus local creative strategies and executions, international media opportunities, and global research methods. It will aim to equip the students with an understanding of the basic principles of advertising, including the various and differing cultural, economic and political factors that impact international marketing communications with a view to get employment in international advertising. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

IMS 6314 Global E-Business Marketing (3 semester credit hours) This course aims at preparing the students for managing global e-business activities within the framework of accelerated trends for globalization. International aspects of e-business have become more important due to the variables in legal and regulatory regimes, the state of the communications infrastructure and differences in culture; including language and perception of the benefits of the Internet. Students will be prepared to understand the worldwide unevenness in the adoption and use of e-business globally and develop ability to customize and personalize the Internet experience to use at their employment in the field. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

IMS 6320 International Corporate Finance (3 semester credit hours) Financial policies and practices of companies involved in multinational operations. The course considers management of working capital and permanent assets. Investment practices and capital budgeting for the global firm. Credit cannot be received for both courses, IMS 6320 and FIN 6366. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) Y

IMS 6340 Managing Strategy and People in International Techno-Creative Industries (3 semester credit hours) "Techno-Creative" industries (game design, animation and social media) have become important global industries. This course will apply principles from strategic management and international HRM to prepare professional to work in and "add value" in these industries. Game design, and related industries will be used in this course as a platform for hands on learning. Case studies, speakers and projects will be used to bring to life principles of strategy and human resource management. No prior interest or experience in game design or related industries is required, but will be welcome. (3-0) Y

IMS 6341 International Human Resource Management (3 semester credit hours) This course will focus on the impact of globalization on managing international human resources. The central aim of this course is to identify the challenges of managing diverse manpower in an international set up and to teach students how to effectively manage diverse manpower in rapidly changing global business environments. Students will learn how to develop an effective human resource management strategy by incorporating cultural, legal and social aspects of a host country. The course also introduces comparative HR practices in the process of expatriates' selection, training and managing of cultural shocks and reverse cultural shocks. (3-0) Y

IMS 6343 Sustainability in a Global Business Environment (3 semester credit hours) This course is expected to enhance global awareness and discovery of how local businesses and organizations can create sustainable value for people and planet. This course will cover basic concepts in business sustainability and organizational management, such as leadership, social capital, and organizational design. Students will have a better understanding of the opportunities and challenges of businesses in a diverse environment challenged by globalization pressures. The course will be offered as part of an interdisciplinary field study program. (3-0) Y

IMS 6345 Global Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course challenges students to address ethics issues across multiple cultures and to leverage their leadership skills to implement strategy and to lead and execute across global markets. Prerequisites: BPS 6310 and IMS 6253. (3-0) Y

IMS 6350 Management Consulting and Research (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This is a course taken under the supervision of an assigned faculty member. The student conducts a field consulting or research project on a topic that is approved and supervised by the faculty sponsor. The course is intended to develop deep knowledge and skill in an area that the student believes will enhance his or her job performance and that is academically rigorous. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6351 Executive International Study Trip - EMBA (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course consists of a ten day international trip. The destinations are chosen to relate to an international emphasis and its themes of managing for change, the strategic perspective, and leadership effectiveness. While abroad, participants visit and hear presentations from local university faculty, local business executives, and expert panels. Participants are also expected to identify important cultural variables that impact business decision making and management in the countries visited. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6354 Global Marketing (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course promotes an appreciation and understanding of theoretical and practical issues involved in marketing products and services in the international context. This course covers the fundamentals and evolution of international marketing, the environment of international marketing, foreign entry methods, evaluation of market potential, management of international marketing mix, consumer behavior and international strategic marketing planning. Prerequisite: MKT 6301. (3-0) Y

IMS 6355 Global Communications and Negotiations (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course focuses on understanding national culture and cultural issues in international business. It emphasizes the importance of managing cultural differences to enhance communication, negotiation, leadership, and group dynamics in an international work environment. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6360 International Strategic Management (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the strategic challenges that multinational firms face. Issues such as managing across national boundaries, responding to environmental challenges, managing international joint ventures and strategic alliances, managing headquarters-subsidiary relationships, and developing global capabilities will be discussed. Prerequisite: IMS 6204. (3-0) Y

IMS 6365 Cross-Culture Communication and Management (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on understanding national culture and cultural issues in international business. It emphasizes the importance of managing cultural differences to enhance communication, negotiation, leadership, and group dynamics in an international work environment. Further, the course describes methods to develop effective selection and training programs for international assignments. (3-0) Y

IMS 6370 Seminar in International Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) One of two capstone courses designed around a study tour to an international location where students attend courses at a local university with local students, interact with managers from local companies regarding business practices, and study the culture of the country they are visiting. Prerequisites: ACCT 6201 and FIN 6301 and MKT 6301 and OPRE 6362 and department consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6371 Seminar in International Strategic Management (3 semester credit hours) One of two capstone courses designed around a study tour to an international location where students attend courses at a local university with local students, interact with managers from local companies regarding business practices, and study the culture of the country they are visiting. Prerequisites: ACCT 6201 and FIN 6301 and MKT 6301 and OPRE 6362 and department consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 6V91 Regional Area Studies: Latin America (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Latin America and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V92 Regional Area Studies: Western Europe (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Western Europe and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V93 Regional Area Studies: Asia (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Asia and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V94 Regional Area Studies: Africa (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Africa and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V95 Regional Area Studies: North America (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in North America and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V96 Regional Area Studies: Eastern Europe (1-3 semester credit hours) History of economic development and overview of current participation of firms in Eastern Europe and their place in the world economy. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) T

IMS 6V98 International Management Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

IMS 6V99 Special Topics in International Management Studies (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

IMS 7300 International Management (3 semester credit hours) Current theory and research on international management, multinational corporations, and government policies affecting international business. Prerequisites: International Management Studies PhD majors only and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

IMS 7301 International Business (3 semester credit hours) Current theories in international business, and the formal and informal institutions affecting international business. (3-0) Y

IMS 8399 Dissertation (3 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. (3-0) S

IMS 8V40 Seminar in International Business (2, 3 or 6 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in international business. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T

IMS 8V60 Readings in International Business (2, 3 or 6 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas in international business. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T

IMS 8V80 Research Series in International Business (2, 3 or 6 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, or 6]-0) T

IMS 8V99 Dissertation (1-9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-9]-0) S

Management and Administrative Sciences

MAS 6100 Advanced Internship (1 semester credit hour) Student gains an advanced experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. (1-0) S

MAS 6101 Legal Considerations in Project Management (1 semester credit hour) Executive Education Course. This courses provides an overview of legal issues encountered during the life of a project. Includes discussion of civil and criminal law; OSHA, safety, environmental and real estate law. Department consent required. (1-0) Y

MAS 6301 Studies in Project Management Practices (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course explores and analyzes the application of project management methodology in practice and professional credentialing of managers of projects, programs, and portfolios. This course is offered in an online format only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary(6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) S

MAS 6308 Business Communication and Leadership (3 semester credit hours) This course helps students improve their professional communication and leadership skills. Through readings, class discussion, group projects, presentations, and writing activities, students are placed in realistic work settings and challenged to see how effective communication and leadership behaviors are not only important for personal success but required by twenty-first century organizations. (3-0) Y

MAS 6373 Performance Based Logistics in Defense (3 semester credit hours) Performance Based Logistics (PBL) is a product support strategy for defense systems that is outcomes based and incentivizes product support providers to reduce costs through innovations and improvements. The course discusses the current state of PBL, the elements that make up a strong PBL arrangement, the role of the Department of Defense (DoD) in PBL contracts, the role of the contractor in PBL contracts, risks and rewards shared by the DoD and contractors, risk management, performance management and baseline performance setting, and contract execution issues. The course uses real examples from the defense industry wherever possible to reinforce the topics. (3-0) R

MAS 6374 Lean Six-Sigma in Defense (3 semester credit hours) Lean Six Sigma is a structured methodology and set of tools and techniques used extensively in the defense industry to improve quality and performance of business processes for the Department of Defense (DoD), contractors, and suppliers. The course provides the knowledge and skills to apply the Lean Six Sigma methodology through Green Belt projects at defense-related organizations, but also any type of organization. Examples from the DoD and major defense contractors will be used throughout the course to show Lean Six Sigma in action. In addition, the course prepares students for taking the Six Sigma Green Belt (SSGB) Certification exam through the American Society for Quality (ASQ) to obtain the professional certification. (3-0) R

MAS 6375 Defense Supply Chain Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Supply chains for defense systems can be incredibly large and complex, which creates unique challenges for managing risks. The course discusses the types of supply chain structures used for defense systems, typical management policies of prime contractors and suppliers, challenges with multi-tier supply chains, challenges with supporting fleets of systems worldwide, problems associated with readiness and aging systems, along with types of risks and typical risk mitigation or avoidance techniques. The course also uses case studies based on actual defense-related supply chain examples and supply chain simulation assist with the learning concepts. (3-0) R

MAS 6376 Contracts Management for Defense (3 semester credit hours) This course discusses the unique acquisition and management processes for defense contracts. Topics include acquisition lifecycle, legal structures of defense contracts, source selection planning, proposal development, solicitation management, source selection evaluation, contract award, and contractor debriefings. The course also covers contract administration, transitioning to performance, quality management, subcontract management, financial management, performance monitoring, change management, and contract closeout. The course also uses real-world examples from the defense industry for case studies and practical exercises. (3-0) R

MAS 6V00 Special Topics in Management Science (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Department consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V01 Special Topics in Management (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V02 Special Topics in Organizational Behavior (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V03 Special Topics in Business Policy and Strategy (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V04 Special Topics in International Management (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V05 Special Topics in Marketing Management (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V06 Special Topics in Finance (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V07 Special Topics in Managerial Economics (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V08 Special Topics in Operations Research (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V09 Special Topics in Accounting (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 6V10 Special Topics in Management Information Systems (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MAS 8113 Practicum in Management (1 semester credit hour) Course develops a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Student is required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective, via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral presentation, reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. (1-0) S

MAS 8399 Dissertation (3 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. (3-0) S

MAS 8V00 Special Topics in Management Science (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V01 Management Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Course develops a student's business knowledge through appropriate developmental work experiences in a real business environment. Student is required to identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective, via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral presentation, reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours). Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V02 Special Topics in Organizational Behavior (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V03 Special Topics in Business Policy and Strategy (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V04 Special Topics in International Management (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V05 Special Topics in Marketing Management (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V06 Special Topics in Finance (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V07 Special Topics in Managerial Economics (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V08 Special Topics in Operations Research (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V09 Special Topics in Accounting (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V10 Special Topics in Management Information Systems (1-3 semester credit hours) May be lecture, seminar, readings or individualized study. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MAS 8V20 Readings Series in Management Science - Operations Research (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V21 Readings Series in Management Science - Management Information Systems (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V22 Readings Series in Management Science - Organizational Behavior (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V23 Readings Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Marketing (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics may vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V24 Readings Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Financial (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V25 Readings Series in Management Science - Operations Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V30 Readings Series in Management Science - Accounting (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V31 Readings Series in Management Science - Strategic Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V32 Readings Series in Management Science - Business Economics (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Investigation into the literature of topical areas of management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V40 Seminar Series in Management Science - Operations Research (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V41 Seminar Series in Management Science - Management Information Systems (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V42 Seminar Series in Management Science - Organizational Behavior (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V43 Seminar Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Marketing (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V44 Seminar Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Financial (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V45 Seminar Series in Management Science - Operations Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V50 Seminar Series in Management Science - Accounting (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V51 Seminar Series in Management Science - Strategic Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V52 Seminar Series in Management Science - Business Economics (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Discussion of selected concepts and theories in management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V80 Research Series in Management Science - Operations Research (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V81 Research Series in Management Science - Management Information Systems (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V82 Research Series in Management Science - Organizational Behavior (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V83 Research Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Marketing (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V84 Research Series in Management Science - Business Systems: Financial (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V85 Research Series in Management Science - Operations Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V90 Research Series in Management Science - Accounting (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V91 Research Series in Management Science - Strategic Management (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V92 Research Series in Management Science - Business Economics (2, 3, 6 or 9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([2, 3, 6 or 9]-0) S

MAS 8V99 Dissertation (1-9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-9]-0) S

Managerial Economics

MECO 6303 (SYSM 6319) Business Economics (3 semester credit hours) Foundations of the economic analysis of business problems, with special emphasis on the operation of markets and the macroeconomy. Prerequisite: OPRE 6303 or equivalent. (3-0) S

MECO 6311 Economics of Information Goods (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of the creation, production, pricing and distribution of products that are mainly informational in nature such as software, television, and web pages. Network effects, path dependence, the choice of standards, and the problems of public goods will be analyzed. Includes examination of the roles of patent and copyright laws in the creation of these goods and the impacts of unauthorized copying. Several case studies will be examined in detail. Prerequisite: (MECO 6303 or SYSM 6319) or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MECO 6312 (BUAN 6312) Applied Econometrics and Time Series Analysis (3 semester credit hours) A survey of techniques used in analyzing cross-sectional, time series and panel data with special emphasis on time series methods. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or SYSM 6303 or FIN 6306 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MECO 6313 The Business of Entertainment (3 semester credit hours) This course examines the economic factors at work in the entertainment industry. The revenue generation models used by the producers of motion pictures, programming for television, radio, and cable TV, as well as videogames and book publishing will be studied in detail. The impact of digitization on costs, the role of copying and copyright, network effects, peer-to-peer file sharing, the labyrinth of property rights, and digital rights management will be examined through the lens of economics. (3-0) T

MECO 6315 Approaches to Statistical Inference (3 semester credit hours) Theory and methods of statistical inference. Classical estimation theory, classical hypothesis testing, Bayesian and alternative approaches to statistical inference, general linear model with applications, and computational methods. Prerequisite: OPRE 7310. (3-0) Y

MECO 6318 Energy Economics (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of energy fundamentals through a detailed examination of the history, structure and functioning of modern energy markets. Topics include models of supply, demand, and transportation; market structure; game theoretic strategies and risk management; environmental issues; and policy and regulation. Prerequisite: MECO 6303 or SYSM 6319. (3-0) R

MECO 6320 Econometrics (3 semester credit hours) Estimation and testing of multivariate econometric models; sets of regression relationships; simultaneous equation systems; applications of methods and models in the analysis of business and economic data. (3-0) Y

MECO 6345 Advanced Managerial Economics (3 semester credit hours) Advanced economic analysis of consumer theory, production theory, exchange, and market interactions. Managerial topics such as comparable worth, product standardization, environmental spillover effects, and imperfect competition. Prerequisites: MECO 6303 or SYSM 6319 and instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MECO 6350 Game Theory (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces game theory, a set of analytical tools used to study the strategic interactions of individuals and institutions. The course covers static and dynamic games, both under complete and incomplete information. Applications include cooperation, price setting under imperfect competition, trust and reputation building, bargaining, auctions, signaling, social preferences and matching markets. (3-0) Y

MECO 6352 (HMGT 6324 and OB 6332 and SYSM 6313) Financial Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. (3-0) Y

MECO 6355 (OPRE 6355) Deal Making Strategies (3 semester credit hours) This course uses experiential hands-on learning to develop students' skills in effectively managing competitive and collaborative business situations. Students will learn: (1) Behavioral principles for effective bargaining. (2) The principles for designing, conducting, and participating in procurement auctions. (3) Methods for increasing cooperation and trust in competitive and collaborative settings. (4) Behavioral principles for designing trading. Each topic in the course will be centered around a set of hands-on business simulations and case studies, in which students will take on the role of market participants working through a business problem. (3-0) R

MECO 6360 Topics in Industrial Organization (3 semester credit hours) Issues in current research on the operation of firms and markets. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MECO 6V99 Special Topics in Managerial Economics (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MECO 7311 Advanced Game Theory (3 semester credit hours) This course covers the Nash-equilibrium based solution concepts in Nash and Bayesian-Nash games, including sub-game perfection, forward and backward induction, trembling hand perfection, sequential equilibrium, and the intuitive criterion with applications to discrete and continuous action games. Prerequisites: MECO 6345 or equivalent and MECO 6350 or equivalent and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MECO 7312 Advanced Statistics and Probability (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the probability theory, including the laws of large numbers and the central limit theorem, statistical inference, the properties of empirical estimators, and various methods of hypothesis testing. The course emphasizes deep understanding and theoretical foundations of the core topics of probability theory and statistical inference. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MECO 7313 Applied Econometrics (3 semester credit hours) This course covers fundamental econometrics concepts using a software package to help students conduct data analysis while learning the various methods in applied econometrics. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite: MECO 7312. (3-0) Y

MECO 7320 Advanced Econometrics (3 semester credit hours) Rigorous treatment of traditional econometrics methods, and introduction to both modern time-series econometrics and advanced non-linear models. Prerequisite: MECO 6320. (3-0) T

MECO 7360 Topics in Econometrics (3 semester credit hours) Issues in current econometric research and practice. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

Management Information Systems

MIS 6204 Information Technology for Management (2 semester credit hours) Necessary background to understand the role of information technology and Management Information Systems in today's business environment. Topics include: strategic role of information, organization of information, information decision making requirements, telecommunications and networking, managing information resources, cloud computing distributed processing, and current information systems/technology issues. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Information Technology and Management. (2-0) S

MIS 6302 (ACCT 6349) Information Technology Strategy and Management (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the strategic management and control issues associated with information technology. It provides a framework to understand how IT strategy aligns with business strategy and focuses on developing an understanding of the key information requirements for developing an IT strategy and systems architecture. This includes conducting IT sourcing analysis, and managing IT investments effectively to maximize business value. The course will consist of a mix of real-world case studies on IT strategy development across different industries. Credit cannot be received for both ACCT 6349 and MIS 6302. (3-0) Y

MIS 6308 (ACCT 6340) System Analysis and Project Management (3 semester credit hours) Provides the student with an in-depth knowledge of object oriented systems analysis and design procedures. Software project management techniques will be introduced. At the end of the course, the student will be able to analyze business solutions and design computer based information systems using object-oriented methodologies. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MIS 6320 or MIS 6326. (3-0) R

MIS 6309 (ACCT 6309) Business Data Warehousing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides the student with in depth knowledge of data warehousing principles, data warehouse techniques, and business intelligence systems. The course introduces the topics of data warehouse design, Extract-Transform-Load (ETL), data cubes, and data marts. Students will create business intelligence using data warehouses with several OLAP and analytical tools. SAP, Business Objects, Cognos, or other data warehousing tools will be used to illustrate data warehousing concepts. (3-0) Y

MIS 6311 (ACCT 6312) Cybersecurity Fundamentals (3 semester credit hours) The course provides an overview of various technical and managerial issues associated with cybersecurity. The topics include risk assessment and management, cybersecurity programs, IT security controls and technologies, security standards and laws, IT auditing, cyber insurance, and other cyber risk mitigation strategies. (3-0) S

MIS 6316 Data Communications (3 semester credit hours) This course covers key aspects of data communications - the fundamentals (including models and standards, throughput and capacity, signaling and transmission, media and wireless basics, encoding schemes and error detection/flow control), switching and networking (including multiplexing and switching, impact of packet size, routing, LANS and cellular concepts like CDMA), and security (including threats, security requirements, symmetric and public-key encryption schemes). (3-0) Y

MIS 6317 (HMGT 6323) Healthcare Informatics (3 semester credit hours) Examines the unique challenges of clinical and patient care delivery in the healthcare industry, including the role of data management, emerging data standards and information technology in improving the quality and cost associated with healthcare. The focus of the course will be on healthcare IT including issues related to governance, data integration, and selection and management of healthcare IT. Credit cannot be received for both courses, HMGT 6323 and MIS 6317. (3-0) T

MIS 6319 Enterprise Resource Planning (3 semester credit hours) Examines the role of enterprise systems in organizations. It will focus on business processes, business process integration, and information technology for enabling the integration. The course also covers selection and implementation of ERP systems. A part of the course will be set aside for demonstration and 'hands on' exercises with one of the available ERP software. (3-0) Y

MIS 6320 (ACCT 6320 and BUAN 6320 and OPRE 6393) Database Foundations (3 semester credit hours) The course provides database knowledge for non-MIS business students to function effectively in their functional area. The course covers conceptual data modeling with the entity-relationship diagram, the fundamentals of relational data model and database queries, and the basic concepts of data warehousing. Structured Query Language will be used extensively. Applications of databases for accounting, finance, marketing, and other areas of business will be emphasized. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Information Technology and Management. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6320 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

MIS 6323 Object Oriented Programming (3 semester credit hours) This course includes the fundamentals of Java programming, writing applets for web-based systems, and business application programming using Java. (3-0) Y

MIS 6324 (BUAN 6324 and OPRE 6399) Business Analytics With SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course covers theories and applications of business analytics. The focus is on extracting business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including (but not limited to) customer segmentation, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems, web mining, and product assortment. The emphasis is placed on the 'know-how' -- knowing how to extract and apply business analytics to improve business decision-making. Students will also acquire hands-on experience with business analytics software in the form of SAS Enterprise Miner. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6324 and MIS 6356. (3-0) Y

MIS 6326 Data Management (3 semester credit hours) Database theory and tools used to manage accounting data and other information are introduced. Topics include relational database theories, Structured Query Language (SQL), database design and conceptual/semantic data modeling. A client/server database environment is developed with a selected SQL server and a database application development tool. MIS 6320 and MIS 6326 cannot both be used to satisfy degree requirements. Prerequisite: MS ITM Major or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MIS 6330 Information Technology Security (3 semester credit hours) With the advances in information technology, security of information assets has become a keenly debated issue for organizations. While much focus has been paid to technical aspects of the problem, managing information security requires more than technology. Effective information security management demands a clear understanding of technical as well as socio-organizational aspects of the problem. The purpose of this course is to prepare business decision makers to recognize the threats and vulnerabilities present in current information systems and who know how to design and develop secure systems. This course (1) uses lectures to cover the different elements of information security, (2) utilizes business cases and academic research studies to discuss information security issues faced by today's businesses, (3) keeps in touch with the security market and practices through webcasts, and (4) presents strategies and tools to develop an information security program within the organization. (3-0) Y

MIS 6332 Advanced ERP: Configurations (3 semester credit hours) The class focuses on advanced process and configuration issues related to ERP implementation. The functional side of sales, distribution, delivery, and billing as well as integration with materials management, production, financial, and management accounting is emphasized. SAP is currently used to discuss and provide hands-on experience with key ideas. Some sales theory will also be discussed. Prerequisite: MIS 6319 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MIS 6334 Advanced Business Analytics With SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course is SAS based and is part of the 4-course curriculum for the SAS data mining certificate program. It will cover the topics as required by the SAS certificate program including data manipulation, imputation, variable selection, SAS/STA, SAS/ETS, SAS/QC (DOE), and various SAS stat modules. Students will also learn various advanced business intelligence topics including business data analytics, model analytics, customer analytics, web intelligence analytics, business performance analytics, and decision-making analytics. Tool to be used includes SAS. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6334 and MIS 6357. Prerequisites: OPRE 6301 and MIS 6324. (3-0) Y

MIS 6337 (ACCT 6336 and HMGT 6336) Information Technology Audit and Risk Management (3 semester credit hours) Management's role in designing and controlling information technology used to process data is studied. Topics include the role of internal and external auditors in systems development, information security, business continuity, information technology, internet, change management, and operations. Focus is placed on the assurance of controls over information technology risks and covers topics directly related to the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam. (3-0) Y

MIS 6338 (ACCT 6338) Accounting Systems Integration and Configuration (3 semester credit hours) Using SAP or similar software, this course focuses on accounting information systems as part of integrated enterprise systems and modern systems analysis and design of integrated accounting systems and related internal control. Emphasis will be on integrated business processes and related financial transaction flows, system analysis and design methods in SAP with focus on configuration methods. ACCT 2302 will also be counted as a prerequisite or corequisite. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 6202 or ACCT 6305 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

MIS 6339 (ACCT 6384) Analytical Reviews Using Audit Software (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the theory and tools used to leverage automated auditing software such as ACL and IDEA. The course includes an analytical review of accounting and operational data for internal auditors and hands-on use of audit software and the development of an audit dashboard. The course also explores ways to leverage the enterprise technology and use available technology to monitor controls and detect fraud. (3-0) R

MIS 6344 Web Analytics (3 semester credit hours) The course examines the technologies, tools, and techniques to maximize return from web sites. The course includes topics related to web site design issues, web data collection tools and techniques, measurement and analysis of web traffic, visitor tracking, search engine optimization, visitor acquisition, conversion and retention, key performance indicators for web sites, and measurement of online marketing campaigns. The use of web analytics tools such as Google Analytics will be an integral part of the course. (3-0) Y

MIS 6345 (BUAN 6345) High Performance Analytics (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of SAN HANA implementation modeling techniques and SAP data services. The course covers HANA architecture, graphic and SQL modeling tools in SAP HANA using text search and analysis, managing modeling content, security and authorizations, and using data services to bring data into SAP HANA as well as non-SAP, data warehouse concepts and sources. Students learn such concepts using hands-on exercises and practical assignments and the data services focused on bringing data into SAP HANA. Prerequisite: MIS 6309. (3-0) Y

MIS 6346 (BUAN 6346) Big Data Analytics (3 semester credit hours) The course covers topics including: (1) understanding of big data concepts, (2) manipulation of big data with popular tools, and (3) distributed analytics programming. The course is project-oriented, thus students are required to establish a big data environment, perform various analytics, and report on project findings. In addition to concepts and theoretical aspects, the course emphasizes on the actual operations of a big data system. Students manipulate the big data environment, use various dedicated big data tools, and perform distributed analytics programming with popular computer languages. Prerequisites: MIS 6324 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

MIS 6352 Web Systems Design and Development (3 semester credit hours) Provides an in depth examination of web application design evaluation practices and web application development techniques. A web application is developed using an agile, team based, software development methodology leveraging a combination of CSS, HTML, JavaScript, XHR, DOM, PHP, and MySQL. Emphasis is given to hands on application of course material through development of a web application prototype under conditions simulating a business environment. (3-0) Y

MIS 6356 (BUAN 6356) Business Analytics With R (3 semester credit hours) This course covers theories and applications of business analytics. The focus is on extracting business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including (but not limited to) customer segmentation, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems, web mining, and product assortment. The emphasis is placed on the 'know-how' -- knowing how to extract and apply business analytics to improve business decision-making. Students will also acquire hands-on experience with business analytics software in the form of R. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6324 and MIS 6356. (3-0) Y

MIS 6357 Advanced Business Analytics With R (3 semester credit hours) This course is based on the open-source R software. Topics include data manipulation, imputation, variable selection, as well as advanced analytic methods. Students will also learn various advanced business intelligence topics including business data analytics, modeling, customer analytics, web intelligence analytics, business performance analytics, and decision-making analytics. Tool to be used includes R. Credit cannot be received for both courses, MIS 6334 and MIS 6357. Prerequisites: OPRE 6301 and MIS 6356. (3-0) Y

MIS 6360 Agile Project Management (3 semester credit hours) Provides an in depth examination of project management principles and agile software development practices. The five process groups and ten knowledge areas of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) are examined in the context of agile systems development life cycles. (3-0) Y

MIS 6363 Cloud Computing (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed as a primer for cloud computing which many believe is the third major wave of computing, after mainframe and client-server computing. The course examines this technology from a business perspective. The course is designed to deliver a holistic and balanced view of business model, technological infrastructure, and security issues of cloud computing useful for the technology student to understand the business challenges and the business student to understand the technology challenges. (3-0) R

MIS 6364 Enterprise IT Architecture (3 semester credit hours) Enterprise IT Architecture (EA) provides a roadmap for the analysis and design of an enterprise in its current and future states from a strategy, business, and technology perspective. The emphasis is on the alignment between IT and organizational objectives through the integration of business architectures, data and information architecture, application architecture, technology architecture, interfaces, and infrastructure. While the course introduces many EA frameworks, it uses TOGAF extensively. (3-0) R

MIS 6369 (OPRE 6369) Supply Chain Software (3 semester credit hours) The course teaches planning and execution of supply chains with software such as SAP's ERP (R3) and Advanced Planning and Optimization (APO). This software is used in lab exercises that provide students with hands-on, experimental learning. The focus is on the supply planning function of supply chain management. Topics include: fundamentals of ERP and SAP, master and transaction data, MRP, forecasting, supply and demand matching, and integration of ERP and APO modules. This course is intended for graduate students with interests in software-based supply chain management. No SAP experience is required. (3-0) S

MIS 6372 IT Services Management (3 semester credit hours) The purpose of this course is to examine and explain how organizations engage and manage their IT services throughout the IT services lifecycle. The course covers topics related to service strategy, service design, service transition, service operation and continuous improvement. It also includes managing outsourced IT services and the organizational, technological and economical aspects associated with the outsourcing of IT services and functions. The course uses ITIL framework to illustrate various concepts. The course also explores how IT services are marketed by IT service providers. Organizational issues relating to changes in structure and culture are also explored. Perspectives relating to industry sectors such as telecom, healthcare and cloud service providers are included in the course. (3-0) Y

MIS 6373 Social Media and Business (3 semester credit hours) Social media represents one of the most significant changes on the Internet. This course is to familiarize students with the newly emerging social media and Web 2.0 landscape and its underlying concepts. The course covers essential skills to analyze, evaluate, and develop the Web 2.0 business models as well as marketing strategies. Different social media and Web 2.0 applications (e.g., Flickr, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Groupon, and Blogs) and their multi-disciplinary implications will be discussed. (3-0) R

MIS 6378 (MKT 6338) Enterprise Systems and CRM (3 semester credit hours) This course studies the theory and practice of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in the modern enterprise. The course explores topics related to strategic customer management, customer analytics, data mining, campaign management, and partner channel management. The course will develop practical skills utilizing the mySAP.com CRM application and CRM analytics and provides a deep understanding of strategic, operational, analytical, and collaborative CRM. (3-0) R

MIS 6380 Data Visualization (3 semester credit hours) This course studies the technologies, techniques and algorithms for the creation of effective data visualization in the context of data science. The course explores topics related to data wrangling, insight modeling, cognitive science, and graphical communication. The course will develop practical skills using data visualization tools including SAP Lumira, Tableau, Excel Powerview, and D3. The primary course objective will be the creation of data visualizations for strategic communication. (3-0) R

MIS 6V98 Information Systems Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MIS 6V99 Special Topics in Management Information Systems (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings, or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

MIS 7220 Colloquium in Management Information Systems (2 semester credit hours) Issues in current information systems research. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (16 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (2-0) R

MIS 7310 Advanced Topics in Knowledge Management (3 semester credit hours) The course will discuss knowledge representations and reasoning techniques. It will focus on (1) conceptual models of knowledge in IT-based systems, (2) automated reasoning mechanisms that are enabled by such representations, and (3) automated discovery of knowledge from data. Applications in decision support systems, expert systems, and personalization and recommendation systems will be discussed. Necessary background in data models and information theory will be provided. (3-0) T

MIS 7330 MIS Teaching Practicum (3 semester credit hours) Individual sessions with a supervising coach. The student will have responsibility for handling all of the instructional duties for a course, including designing the syllabus, and all assessment. Feedback and guidance will help the student develop their teaching skills. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (15 semester credit hours maximum). Department consent required. (3-0) S

MIS 7340 Independent Study in MIS (3 semester credit hours) The student studies in depth a topic of interest to them in MIS (Management Information Systems) under the guidance of an instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. (3-0) S

MIS 7420 Seminar in Management Information Systems (4 semester credit hours) Survey of theoretical issues and research in information systems. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (12 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (4-0) R

Marketing Management

MKT 6201 Marketing Management with Healthcare Application (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course discusses the marketing management methods including healthcare for-profit and not-for-profit applications and covers principles and concepts including the Five Ps of marketing: product, pricing, promotion and place (or distribution) and people (or customer service/sales), market segmentation, targeting, and positioning. Instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

MKT 6301 (SYSM 6318) Marketing Management (3 semester credit hours) Overview of marketing management methods, principles and concepts including product, pricing, promotion and distribution decisions as well as segmentation, targeting and positioning. (3-0) S

MKT 6309 Marketing Research (3 semester credit hours) Methods employed in market research to understand consumer behavior to enable better marketing decision-making. Topics include focus groups, understanding different sources of secondary data, questionnaire design, design of experiments, sampling plans, and data analysis using statistical techniques. In addition, the course will cover attitude measurement, and market research on the Internet. Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 and OPRE 6301) or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6310 Consumer Behavior (3 semester credit hours) An exposition of the theoretical perspectives of consumer behavior along with practical marketing implication. Study of psychological, sociological and behavioral findings and frameworks with reference to consumer decision-making. Topics will include the consumer decision-making model, individual determinants of consumer behavior and environmental influences on consumer behavior and their impact on marketing. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6321 Interactive and Digital Marketing (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the theory and practice of interactive and digital marketing. Topics covered include: online-market research, consumer behavior and segmentation considerations; websites, search advertising, search engine marketing, email, mobile, video and social networks. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6322 Internet Business Models (3 semester credit hours) Topics to be covered are: consumer behavior on the Internet, advertising on the Internet, competitive strategies, market research using the Internet, brand management, managing distribution and supply chains, pricing strategies, electronic payment systems, and developing virtual organizations. Further, students learn auction theory, web content design, and clickstream analysis. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6323 Database Marketing (3 semester credit hours) Techniques to analyze, interpret, and utilize marketing databases of customers to identify a firm's best customers, understanding their needs, and targeting communications and promotions to retain such customers. Topics include: handling, creating and reading datasets, LifeTime Value, RFM and response analysis. In addition, students will learn to use SAS software. Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 and OPRE 6301) or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6328 Product Management (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to the theory and practice of product management. The course covers the management and marketing of new or existing products. Topics include: considerations and managing of the product, pricing, promotions and placement throughout a products lifecycle; competitive analysis and strategies; budgeting and forecasting; product line extensions and portfolio management. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6329 New Product Development (3 semester credit hours) Development and introduction of new products. Topics include product positioning, screening, concept development, test marketing, and branding strategies. Further students will learn to use conjoint analysis for new product development, measurement of brand equity, product line extensions, and management of services. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6330 Brand Management (3 semester credit hours) To study the role and philosophy of brand management in the strategic marketing process and the resulting effects on strategic and marketing decisions. Topics will include the strategic brand building process, segmentation and positioning for building brands, consumer behavior, brand information systems, building brand equity and the application of brand management using marketing principles. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6331 Building and Managing Professional Sales Organizations (3 semester credit hours) The focus of this course is on the development and management of a professional sales organization. The course will explore the different strategies needed for different markets (consumer, business, government, and global). While the course will examine the various training programs available, there will be relatively little emphasis on sales techniques (this is not a course to learn basic selling concepts). We examine issues related to building and managing the sales effort at various stages of the company and product lifecycle, hiring and training sales personnel, compensation and incentive plans, sales forecasting, addressing multiple product lines, multiple channels and multiple geographic regions, and developing strategic alliances. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6332 Advertising and Promotional Strategy (3 semester credit hours) The process of formulating promotional strategy with particular emphasis on advertising and sales promotions. Topics include behavioral theories of communication, budgeting, media selection, scheduling of advertisements, measurement of advertising effectiveness, and management different types of sales promotions. Students analyze grocery scanner data to evaluate the effectiveness of promotions. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6333 Channels of Distribution and Retailing (3 semester credit hours) This course will study the design and implementation of channels of distribution, with particular emphasis on retailing, including electronic retailing. Topics covered will include channel coverage strategies, pricing and promotion in channels, retail services, location decisions, franchising and legal issues in channels. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6334 Digital Sales Strategy (3 semester credit hours) The course explores three distinct areas within marketing and sales namely, digital marketing, traditional sales prospecting, and executive sales organization and strategy. The continuing convergence of the digital marketing and sales funnels has created a strategic continuum from digital lead generation to digital sales. The course identifies the current composition of this digital continuum while providing opportunities to evaluate sales and marketing digital strategies. The course will cover concepts including the difference between inbound and outbound digital marketing strategies, tracking CRM inquiries in the funnel, and lead scoring. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6335 Advertising Research (3 semester credit hours) The course serves as a central basis for marketing communication related decision making and provides an introduction to advertising research designs and procedures. The course is practical, quantitative, and an emphases on tools and applications that take advantage of information tracking technologies in the digital environment. Topics include (1) the acquisition, evaluation, and analysis of information needed for informed advertising decision making and planning; (2) methods used in pre-testing advertising messages, post campaign (tracking studies) testing, concept testing, observational research, ethnographic research, surveys, focus groups, and various sources of secondary data; (3) new trends in advertising research such as the use of social media data and geo-location information collected from mobile devices. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6336 Pricing (3 semester credit hours) Techniques to price durable goods, packaged goods and services. Topics include: perceived value pricing, bundling, price discrimination, product-line pricing, dynamic pricing over the products' life-cycle, pricing through the marketing channel, and competitive pricing. In addition to microeconomic approaches to pricing, behavioral approaches to pricing will also be covered. Pricing decisions will be analyzed using spreadsheet analysis. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6337 (BUAN 6337) Marketing Predictive Analytics Using SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed for those interested in a career in marketing analytics. Students analyze data from large databases to make important marketing decisions. These methods are commonly employed in online marketing, grocery stores, and in financial markets. Students will acquire knowledge about the tools and software that are used to understand issues such as who the profitable customers are, how to acquire them, and how to retain them. The tools can also be used to manage brand prices and promotions using scanner data as is done in supermarkets. Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 or major in MS Business Analytics) and OPRE 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6338 (MIS 6378) Enterprise Systems and CRM (3 semester credit hours) This course studies the theory and practice of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in the modern enterprise. The course explores topics related to strategic customer management, customer analytics, data mining, campaign management, and partner channel management. The course will develop practical skills utilizing the mySAP.com CRM application and CRM analytics and provides a deep understanding of strategic, operational, analytical, and collaborative CRM. (3-0) R

MKT 6339 Capstone Marketing Decision Making (3 semester credit hours) This is a simulation based course where students form groups and compete for market share, profits, and stock price in a competitive fictional market. Teams make tactical decisions about production quantity, price, advertising, sales force allocation and develop new product specifications to compete with other teams for different segments in the market place. The course provides a hands-on experience in marketing decision-making and allows students to integrate the knowledge they learned to make more effective decisions. Prerequisite: MKT 6301. (3-0) Y

MKT 6340 Marketing Projects Lab (3 semester credit hours) Sponsored by local industries, these projects provide the students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained to solve real world marketing problems. Students work in a team environment, interact with industry leaders, and gain industry specific knowledge. May be repeated for credits as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: MKT 6301 and (MKT 6309 or MKT 6310) or instructor consent required. (0-3) T

MKT 6341 Campaign Management and Digital Analytics Lab (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with both theoretical and practical knowledge using campaign management software. The course covers marketing automation, optimization and testing, retargeting, attribution, and especially the use and deployment of web analytics. The analytical, direct marketing, and decision making techniques are an overarching component of the course. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (0-3) Y

MKT 6342 Marketing Customer Insights Development (3 semester credit hours) This course provides managers with a foundation in analysis and presentation techniques. Students will learn how to create and use data visualization, apply estimation techniques, solve problems by applying frameworks and extract insights from data. The art and technique of preparing and delivering executive level presentations will be emphasized. A significant component of the course will consist of critical thinking, problem-solving and decision making techniques using in customer insight development. Prerequisites: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6343 Content and Social Media Marketing (3 semester credit hours) This course provides students with the theory and practice of social media tools used by marketing departments and agencies. Students learn best practices in social media for improving awareness, engagement, lead generation purposes, online reputation management, and word-of-mouth marketing. The course also provides a strategic foundation for both B-C and B-B environments including platform selection, developing a social media content strategy, content curation, social media calendars, and metrics. The course includes a significant hands-on component. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

MKT 6350 Competitive Marketing Strategy (3 semester credit hours) Students learn how firms develop their marketing strategy to compete effectively in different situations. Using game theory principles, they will be exposed to competitive strategies in new emerging markets, mature markets, and on the Internet. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

MKT 6360 Services Marketing (3 semester credit hours) To study the growing field of services marketing as a separate and distinct area of marketing thought and practice and its influence in competitive markets. The focus will be on three main services marketing areas, the service customer, the service company and the integration of marketing, human resources and operations within the service system. The course is intended to help analyze and judge the merits of services marketing strategies and assist in making strategic decisions in both business and consumer services industries. Topics will include: relationship marketing and the customer mix, understanding the service customer, external service quality: service design and delivery, the service brand, service strategy; technology and innovation, international services marketing, pricing and promotion of services. Prerequisite: MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6362 Marketing Models (3 semester credit hours) This course teaches quantitative models that are necessary when implementing marketing strategy such as segmentation, positioning, product portfolios and marketing mix variables. Companies are increasingly using and applying the modeling approach to marketing decision making. Topics and tools covered include: forecasting, product diffusion and advertising, sales force allocation and sizing models, analysis of scanner data in brand choice models, promotional profitability and more. Students will be given a rudimentary knowledge of SAS and other commercially-used software. Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 and OPRE 6301) or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6363 Advanced Marketing Research with SAS (3 semester credit hours) An overview of marketing research with an emphasis on statistical analysis of marketing data sets using the SAS statistical package. This course will provide fundamental grounding in the interface between the SAS data step, which is the environment for accessing, structuring, formatting and manipulating data, and SAS procedures, including: summarize, analyze, and display. Special attention will be given to marketing data collection and analysis with an emphasis on demand forecasting and customer segmentation. (3-0) Y

MKT 6365 Marketing Digital Lab (3 semester credit hours) This course offers students the opportunity to learn and work with different digital applications frequently used by marketing/advertising companies and agencies. The course incorporates the use of emerging digital tools utilized in user experience (UX) web and mobile testing, data visualization, website creation, web based apps, search engine optimization, and paid search campaigns (i.e. Google AdWords). Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 and MKT 6321) or instructor consent required. (0-3) T

MKT 6380 (ENTP 6380) Market Entry Strategies (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the marketing challenges facing the entrepreneurial firm, with specific emphasis on the choice and implementation of an initial market entry strategy. This choice typically involves multiple decisions, each based on critical assumptions about customers, markets and competitors. Early validation of these key assumptions is an essential element of the strategic decision process. Topics include understanding the context and the customer, developing and validating the business concept, defining the product/service offering and customer value proposition, positioning, creating awareness, and developing and implementing the market entry strategy. Credit cannot be received for both courses, ENTP 6380 and MKT 6380. Prerequisite: ENTP 6370 or MKT 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 6382 (ENTP 6382) Professional Selling I (3 semester credit hours) Examines the theory and practical application of the principles and art of professional selling. The course places special emphasis on mapping the sales process for new companies and new products. The course includes case studies and learning by doing live case instruction. This course also includes advanced concepts in sales such as major account acquisition, government markets, global markets, request for information, request for proposal, product line sales, adaptive product and service solutions, team selling, long sales cycles, prospecting and networking strategies, implementation and analysis of prospecting strategies, and sales management strategies for the early stage of the product lifecycle. (3-0) Y

MKT 6383 Professional Selling II (3 semester credit hours) This course uses a case based experiential approach to learning the sales process. Advanced approaches used in business mid-market to enterprise and government sales will be introduced. Students will explore inside sales, outside sales, request for information and request for proposal methods of account acquisition and management. This course will focus on both products and services in the later stage of the product lifecycle. Students will practice multi-visit role-plays in a team sales setting with existing partners of the JSOM Center for Professional Selling. (3-0) Y

MKT 6V98 Marketing Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

MKT 6V99 Special Topics in Marketing (1-6 semester credit hours) Study of rapidly emerging or changing areas within marketing. The specific topic will fall under one of the following categories: advertising, branding, digital marketing, product management, sales, marketing management or marketing analytics and market research. The course may consist of participation in one or more major marketing competitions. May be lecture, readings, individualized study or team based competitions. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisites: (MKT 6301 or MKT 6309) and MKT 6310 or instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) Y

MKT 7314 Marketing Models I (3 semester credit hours) Study of mathematical models used in solving marketing problems including brand switching, new product adoption, and competitive strategy models. Prerequisites: (OPRE 6302 and MKT 6301) or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 7315 Marketing Models II (3 semester credit hours) Advanced study of mathematical models used in solving marketing problems including brand switching, new product adoption, and competitive strategy models. Prerequisites: (OPRE 6302 and MKT 6301) or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

MKT 7V12 Research Applications in Marketing (3-4 semester credit hours) Application of multivariate methods in statistics to marketing problems including discriminant analysis, logit/probit analysis, and other multivariate applications. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: (OPRE 6301 and MKT 6301) or instructor consent required. ([3-4]-0) T

Organizational Behavior

OB 6152 Executive Coaching (1 semester credit hour) Executive Education Course. This is a one-on-one, developmental experience with a professional, ICF certified executive coach. The goal of the coaching experience is to develop the soft skills required for leadership positions including executive presence, strategic self-awareness, social networking, political intelligence, and social intelligence. Instructor consent required. (1-0) Y

OB 6248 Coaching Practice Lab I (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Small group practice sessions for the purpose of applying and deepening the principles and techniques learned throughout the coaching classes. The purpose of this class is to engage in applied learning through peer-to-peer interaction with instructor feedback. (2-0) S

OB 6249 Coaching Practice Lab II (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Small group practice sessions for the purpose of applying and deepening the principles and techniques learned throughout the coaching classes. The purpose of this advanced class is to engage in applied learning through peer-to-peer interaction with instructor feedback. (2-0) S

OB 6253 Coaching Practicum (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Individual sessions with a supervising coach and small-group supervised sessions. For the individual sessions, students will be required to submit recordings for review or provide for real-time attendance by the supervising coach so that an evaluation of their coaching competence can occur. Feedback and guidance will help students develop their coaching skills. A comprehensive exam will be used to evaluate coaching competency. The exam will test for their knowledge, skills, and abilities as an executive and professional coach. Instructor consent required. Pass/Fail only. (2-0) T

OB 6255 Capstone in Organizational Behavior and Coaching (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. The capstone course is the culmination of the program. Students are required through research to integrate the major theories and principles of the entire curriculum. Students further develop their knowledge of organizational behavior and executive coaching through application of field experiences. Department consent required. (2-0) S

OB 6261 Executive Workshop (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. New students begin the Executive MBA program by attending this workshop and completing the follow-up assignments. The course focuses primarily on lectures and experiential learning exercises conducted by the Leadership Center at UT Dallas and other Centers of Excellence from Jindal School of Management. Instructor consent required. (2-0) Y

OB 6301 (SYSM 6333) Organizational Behavior (3 semester credit hours) The study of human behavior in organizations. Emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical methods for understanding, analyzing, and predicting individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include work motivation, group dynamics, decision making, conflict and negotiation, leadership, power, and organizational culture. Ethical and international considerations are also addressed. (3-0) S

OB 6303 Managing Organizations (3 semester credit hours) Macro-management: managing internal organizational processes such as restructuring, and external network relationships such as strategic alliances. Applications to current management issues. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OB 6305 Foundations of Work Behavior (3 semester credit hours) Individual work behaviors such as organizational choice, motivation, performance, turnover, and absenteeism. Motivational processes which support such behaviors and the personal reactions of persons to them. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) Y

OB 6307 Strategic Human Resource Management (3 semester credit hours) Theories, concepts, and procedures involved in managing human resources. Examination of the correspondence between organizational strategies and human resources needed to carry out those strategies. Topics include job analysis, compensation and benefits, performance management, succession planning, career development issues, legal considerations, and international issues. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OB 6321 Principles of Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Theories and techniques of leadership, emphasizing the complementary roles of management and leadership in organizations. The course will address emotional intelligence, leadership styles, communications and leadership processes, focusing on how leaders turn challenging opportunities into successes and get extraordinary things done in organizations. Self-assessment exercises will focus on the development of individual leadership skills. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OB 6322 Interpersonal Dynamics (3 semester credit hours) Structures and processes governing interactions among persons in small groups, linking individuals into social units. Structures of power, leadership, norms, roles and status. Processes of intimacy, influence, communication, decision making, cooperation/conflict and change. Prerequisite: OB 6301. (3-0) T

OB 6326 Organizations and Organizing (3 semester credit hours) Means by which people create, maintain, and change organized work structures. Resulting alternative organizational forms are examined. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OB 6331 Power and Politics in Organizations (3 semester credit hours) Political processes and the development and use of power in organizations including the role of power in decision-making, sources of power, conditions for the use of power, assessing power in organizations; political strategies and tactics; political language and symbols, and applications to budgeting, careers and organizational structure. (3-0) T

OB 6332 (HMGT 6324 and MECO 6352 and SYSM 6313) Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. (3-0) Y

OB 6333 Managerial Decision Making (3 semester credit hours) Normative and descriptive examination of managerial decision making at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Exploration of cognitive heuristics, rational and non-rational decision making, temporal decision processes, and strategic decision processes under the influence of uncertainty and ambiguity of organizational contexts. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OB 6334 Foundations of Organizational Development (3 semester credit hours) Explores the foundations and role of organizational development. Topics include: emergence and development of the field and its role in twenty-first century organizations; major macro-level organizational concepts such as organizational strategy, structure, culture, innovation, and globalization; and the role of organizational development in change management, intervention strategies and group process. (3-0) R

OB 6335 Organizational Development Process and Practice (3 semester credit hours) Explores the functions and practices of organizational development. Topics include establishing vision and mission and strategic alignment, conducting inquiry and addressing resistance, engaging leaders and supporting participants, and small scale change - individuals and groups. Prerequisite: OB 6334 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OB 6337 Motivational Leadership in Organizations (3 semester credit hours) Analyzes the types of behaviors which lead to high performance within healthcare organizations. Topics include individual behavior and motivation, behavioral job requirements and job/person matching, the differences between leadership and managerial behavior; and how to establish and maintain a high performance work climate. (3-0) Y

OB 6338 Coaching as a Leadership Style (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Develops highly effective coaching skills for fostering positive change in both individuals and teams. Topics include developing an effective coaching relationship through intelligent listening and authentic feedback, assessing an individual's readiness for change and helping to increase colleagues' personal and professional effectiveness. (3-0) Y

OB 6339 Negotiations and Contracts (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course addresses contracts and explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OB 6340 Leading Strategic Change Processes in an International Environment (3 semester credit hours) This course emphasizes practical skills required to be an effective change agent. Topics include entry in change projects, negotiating role expectations, contracting, diagnostic interviewing, motivating system change and overcoming resistance, group dynamics and large group interventions, and intercultural differences in leadership expectations. All participants will be involved in a change project as part of the course. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OB 6347 Performance Management Systems (3 semester credit hours) A systematic approach is taken to show how performance management adds value to the organization. Emphasis is on the manager-employee communication process involved in establishing clear expectations and understanding about the job. Job functions, the role of the job in reaching organizational goals, performance appraisal techniques and uses, and performance improvement issues are addressed. Prerequisite: OB 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OB 6350 Introduction to Executive and Professional Coaching (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. The class provides students with a study of the origins and structure of coaching. Topics include the current status of coaching, the history of coaching as a profession, basic coaching principles, ethics and standards, the core competencies of coaching, and basic coaching techniques and practices. It also addresses the role of personal style in coaching and how to adjust coaching behavior to fit the coaching requirements of clients. (3-0) T

OB 6351 Coaching in the Business or Organizational Setting (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course prepares coaches to work with individuals and teams in a corporate or business environment. Topics include coaching and organizational behavior theories and models that facilitate client change within an organizational setting, coaching executives with an emphasis on achieving business results, coaching methods for groups, and research practices. (3-0) T

OB 6352 Advanced Coaching Models and Methods (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. The course provides students with advanced principles and practices for coaching individuals within the corporate setting. Topics include appreciative inquiry models and techniques, a practical lab in team coaching, a survey of evidence-based coaching models, the use of language to promote change, research practices, and evidence based positive psychology. (3-0) T

OB 6354 Organizations and Environments (3 semester credit hours) This course covers the analysis of organization- environment relations, with special emphasis on managing the organization for strategic advantage. Theories and concepts will be drawn from the fields of organizational sociology, industrial organization economics, and strategic management. Topics include mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures, regulation and deregulation, the role of boards of directors, the diffusion of organizational innovations, collective organizational actions such as joint ventures, the formation of trade associations, and industry evolution. (3-0) R

OB 6355 Capstone in Organizational Behavior and Coaching (3 semester credit hours) The capstone course is the culmination of the program. Students are required through research to integrate the major theories and principles of the entire curriculum. Students further develop their knowledge of organizational behavior and executive coaching through application of field experiences. Department consent required. (3-0) S

OB 6V99 Special Topics in Organizational Behavior (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Instructor consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

OB 7300 Organization Theory (3 semester credit hours) Survey of major theoretical perspectives and current research in organization theory. Prerequisite: International Management Studies PhD majors only and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OB 7302 Organization Behavior (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to expose students to a variety of organizational behavior/human resource management (OB/HRM) topics and data gathering techniques. Different procedures for gathering research data, usually within the context of the papers will be critiqued and a term paper is required. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OB 7303 Research Methodology in Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours) Advantages and disadvantages of research based on field experiments, field studies, survey analyses, laboratory experiments, participant observation, content analyses, interviewing, cross-cultural studies, simulations, demographic and data archive methods. Integration of research designs and multimethod techniques. Topics may vary. (3-0) T

OB 7306 Macro-Organizational Empirical Investigation (3 semester credit hours) PhD seminar in the process of empirical research on organizations including formulation of a research question; the development and application of theory leading to the construction of models and the formulation of hypotheses; the design of a study; identification of data sources and the collection of data; computer analysis of data to test hypotheses; and the presentation of the study in a research paper. Emphasis will be given to linear models, archival data, and regression analysis, but other approaches will be discussed. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: OB 7300 or equivalent or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OB 7310 Theory and Research in Group and Intergroup Processes (3 semester credit hours) Current theories of group processes and group development in different social contexts. Work and non-work, intergroup relationships, group task and process issues, stages of group development, group norms, group roles, group structure, leadership, group cohesion, intergroup conflict and cooperation, intergroup interdependencies and organizational structure, boundary roles, intergroup communication, power, organizational politics and managing intergroup differences. Prerequisites: (OB 6301 or OB 6303) and OB 6322 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OB 7312 Social Network Theory (3 semester credit hours) Social network theory focuses on structural relations among people and organizations. As one of the fastest growing paradigms originated from anthropology and sociology, it has gained enormous popularity within the broad field of organizational management. This course provides a systematic introduction to social network theory by reviewing its basic history, philosophy, theories, and methodologies. The course also explores how social network theory can be applied to addressing various management issues such as knowledge diffusion, social capital, strategic alliance, and network dynamics. (3-0) R

OB 7313 Seminar on Organizational Decision Making (3 semester credit hours) This seminar provides a systematic and up-to-date literature background for academic research in this area. This course covers normative, descriptive, and non-rational aspects of decision making at the individual, group, and organizational/strategic levels. The course also examines the impact of contextual factors such as uncertainty, ambiguity, environment, structure, process, information technology, international culture, and ethics on organizational decision making. (3-0) R

Operations Research

OPRE 6000 Professional Development (0 semester credit hours) This course is designed to enhance the students' experience such as building networking skills, verbal and written communication skills, business etiquette and learning how to increase their human capital. The goal of this course is to make students more marketable and valuable professionals to the global economy. (1-0) S

OPRE 6250 Global Supply Chain Management (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course addresses the design and management of global supply chain including international sourcing, integration of suppliers and distribution channels. Prerequisite: OPRE 6201 or OPRE 6302. (2-0) Y

OPRE 6271 Project Overview, Strategic and Process Management (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Introduces the project lifecycle, typical project management processes, leadership and teaming in project management, the relevance of business process analysis, strategic alignment of projects, and financial considerations in project selection. (2-0) R

OPRE 6274 Project Execution Planning (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Concludes the introduction of project planning techniques started in OPRE 6373. Topics include negotiation, project time, resource, cost, and risk management. Prerequisite: OPRE 6373. (2-0) S

OPRE 6275 Project Execution, Control and Closeout (2 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Introduces project execution, control and closeout techniques. Topics include project execution and control including earned value management, lean and six sigma methodologies, procurement management and project closeout. Prerequisite: OPRE 6274. (2-0) S

OPRE 6301 (SYSM 6303) Quantitative Introduction to Risk and Uncertainty in Business (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to statistical and probabilistic methods and theory applicable to situations faced by managers. Topics include: data presentation and summarization, regression analysis, fundamental probability theory and random variables, introductory decision analysis, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and One Way ANOVA. (Some sections of this class may require a laptop computer). (3-0) S

OPRE 6302 (SYSM 6334) Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) Operations Management integrates all of the activities and processes that are necessary to provide products and services. This course overviews methods and models that help managers make better operating decisions over time. How these methods will allow firms to operate both manufacturing and service facilities in order to compete in a global environment will also be discussed. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301. (3-0) S

OPRE 6303 Quantitative Foundations of Business (3 semester credit hours) This course discusses the applications of some basic mathematical concepts necessary for the business environment. Students are introduced to selected topics, including those in college algebra, matrix algebra, calculus, and optimization, and their usage in the context of managerial decision-making. MS Excel is used to illustrate and understand the core concepts. Department consent required. (3-0) S

OPRE 6325 (HMGT 6325) Healthcare Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) Explores how effectively managing and continuously improving the end-to-end heal care supply chain provides a competitive advantage. Topics include supply chain fundamentals, key players in the health care supply chain and their challenges, how the health care supply chain works, impact of technology on supply chain performance, and lean six sigma methodology. Simulations and case studies will reinforce the learning. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6332 Spreadsheet Modeling and Analytics (3 semester credit hours) This course explains the concepts of effective spreadsheet design and model building utilizing the electronic spreadsheet as the principal device. The course helps students to take an analytic view and acquire knowledge about specific decision making techniques for business, such as optimization and simulation, building spreadsheet models to identify choices, formalize trade-offs, specify constraints, perform sensitivity analyses, and analyze the impact of uncertainty. The course also examines the applications in finance, economics, marketing, and operations. (3-0) S

OPRE 6335 (SYSM 6304) Risk and Decision Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an overview of the main concepts and methods of risk assessment, risk management, and decision analysis. The methods used in industry, such as probabilistic risk assessment, six sigma, and reliability, are discussed. Advanced methods from economics and finance (decision optimization and portfolio analysis) are presented. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or SYSM 6303. (3-0) T

OPRE 6340 (MECH 6335) Flexible Manufacturing Strategies (3 semester credit hours) The use of automation in manufacturing is continuously increasing. This course covers the variety of types of flexible automation, including flexible manufacturing systems, integrated circuit fabrication and assembly, and robotics. Examples of international systems are discussed to show the wide variety of systems designs and problems. Strategic as well as economic justification issues are covered. (3-0) R

OPRE 6341 Retail Operations (3 semester credit hours) This course will examine new developments in retailing and the application of operations management principles to those developments. Topics include demand forecasting methods, responsive supply chains, incentives, store execution, assortment planning, in-store experiments, retailing in emerging markets, online retailing, innovation, use of technology such as radio frequency identification (RFID), growth and risk management, performance assessment, and impact on financial performance. Special attention will be given to the global nature of the retail industry and its development in emerging markets. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6342 Special Topics in Product Lifecycle and Supply Chain Management (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. This course introduces selected topics in product lifecycle and supply chain management. Students will be exposed to technology solutions, value management and business simulations to learn the interactions and challenges in decision making in a real world supply chain environment. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6355 (MECO 6355) Deal Making Strategies (3 semester credit hours) This course uses experiential hands-on learning to develop students' skills in effectively managing competitive and collaborative business situations. Students will learn: (1) Behavioral principles for effective bargaining. (2) The principles for designing, conducting, and participating in procurement auctions. (3) Methods for increasing cooperation and trust in competitive and collaborative settings. (4) Behavioral principles for designing trading. Each topic in the course will be centered around a set of hands-on business simulations and case studies, in which students will take on the role of market participants working through a business problem. (3-0) R

OPRE 6362 (SYSM 6311) Project Management in Engineering and Operations (3 semester credit hours) Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing and managing resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives. The course will cover various aspects of managing projects in engineering and operations environments including the critical path methods for planning and controlling projects, time and cost tradeoffs, resource utilization, organizational design, conflict resolution and stochastic considerations. (3-0) S

OPRE 6363 Inventory Control (3 semester credit hours) Analysis of deterministic and simple stochastic inventory models. Stochastic periodic reorder models with simple deterministic and simulation solutions. Lot size models and their extensions, reorder point determination, price break, Wagner-Whitin, Modigliani-Holn models. Prerequisite: OPRE 6302 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OPRE 6364 Lean Six Sigma (3 semester credit hours) This course discusses the Lean and Six Sigma quality framework as it applies to manufacturing, service operations, re-engineering the design of products and processes to reduce waste and variability, use of Define-Measure-Improve-Control (DMAIC) methodology, and application of Lean for continuous improvement. (3-0) S

OPRE 6366 Global Supply Chain Management (3 semester credit hours) Key issues associated with the design and management of industrial supply chains. The efficient integration of suppliers, factories, warehouses, and stores so that products are distributed to global customers in the right quantity and at the right time. Prerequisite: OPRE 6302 or instructor consent required. (3-0) S

OPRE 6367 Capstone Projects in Supply Chain Management (3 semester credit hours) Capstone projects are sponsored by local industries and provide the students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge gained to solve real world challenging problems in the area of supply chain management. Students work in a team environment, interact with industry leaders, and gain some industry specific knowledge. Prerequisites: OPRE 6366 and OPRE 6370 and instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6368 Industrial Applications in Supply Chains (3 semester credit hours) The course discusses and reviews major supply chain challenges and relevant decision making tools used in the industry. The course proceeds with the analysis of real-life cases during which the students obtain industry specific knowledge. Some of the industries of interest are Telecommunications, High-tech Electronics, Semiconductors, Consumer Goods and Retail. Prerequisite: OPRE 6366 or instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OPRE 6369 (MIS 6369) Supply Chain Software (3 semester credit hours) The course teaches planning and execution of supply chains with software such as SAP's ERP (R3) and Advanced Planning and Optimization (APO). This software is used in lab exercises that provide students with hands-on, experimental learning. The focus is on the supply planning function of supply chain management. Topics include: fundamentals of ERP and SAP, master and transaction data, MRP, forecasting, supply and demand matching, and integration of ERP and APO modules. This course is intended for graduate students with interests in software-based supply chain management. No SAP experience is required. (3-0) S

OPRE 6370 Global Logistics and Transportation (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the design and analysis of global logistics, transportation and supply chain systems including the components such as suppliers, warehouse, packaging and material handling, customers, production, inventory, orders, transportation, and information systems. The course also discusses the interactions between these components; models and techniques for the analysis of logistics systems as well as the strategic financial outcomes influenced by the logistics decisions. Prerequisite: OPRE 6302 or instructor consent required. (3-0) S

OPRE 6371 Purchasing, Sourcing and Contract Management (3 semester credit hours) Basic concepts and processes in purchasing, sourcing and contract management are introduced in this course. It teaches global sourcing techniques and the application of various management tools and quality tools in purchasing. Focus is on the proactive and planned analysis of supply markets and the selection of suppliers, with the objective of delivering solutions to meet pre-determined and agreed organizational needs. (3-0) S

OPRE 6372 Project Initiation (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Explores project manager credentialing, professional ethics, and project management in a global environment; then bridges from strategy to project definition with a discussion of project selection and a focus on determining project requirements and managing changes. Course delivery is integrated with relevant modules from OB 6301 Organizational Behavior. Prerequisite: OPRE 6271. (3-0) R

OPRE 6373 Project Planning (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Continues from project initiation and covers the initial stages of planning a project, including scope management, quality planning, project team building, dealing with conflict, and negotiation. Course delivery is integrated with relevant modules from OB 6301 Organizational Behavior. Prerequisite: OPRE 6372. (3-0) R

OPRE 6374 Project Planning and Execution (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Continues the discussion of planning techniques from OPRE 6373 and introduces execution phase processes. Topics include scheduling, resource planning, budgeting, negotiation skills development, and risk management. Prerequisite: OPRE 6373. (3-0) R

OPRE 6375 Project Execution and Closeout (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Continues the discussion of planning and execution techniques from OPRE 6374 and discusses project closeout. Topics include project procurement management, earned value management, lean and six sigma methodologies, and project execution and control. Prerequisite: OPRE 6374. (3-0) R

OPRE 6376 Advanced Project Management and Simulation (3 semester credit hours) Executive Education Course. Explores project organizational competence, maturity models, project portfolio management, program management, PM offices, alternate project management methodologies including Agile and simulates a project lifecycle. Prerequisite: OPRE 6375. (3-0) R

OPRE 6377 Demand and Revenue Management (3 semester credit hours) This course focuses on the expense involved in managing conventional and idiosyncratic demand through the supply process. Demand for a single unit or an assembly (network) of units requires forecasting that incorporates prices and macroeconomic factors. Perishable supplies are optimally priced by considering their amount (inflated in overbooking), location, vintage, and customer classes. This approach is relevant for airlines, hotels, parks, rental cars, broadcasters, art/sport events, and retailers. Prerequisite: OPRE 6302. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6378 Supply Chain Strategy (3 semester credit hours) The success of a product (and a firm) in today's global marketplace depends on activities of firms in the product's supply chain. Students will learn how to develop strategies to create value through supply chain design, how to better structure a company's global operations strategy, how to develop guidelines for making strategic sourcing and make-buy decisions, how to deploy operations for successful turnarounds, and how to effectively use information technology to synchronize and manage global supply chains. Case studies will cover recent trends in supply chain strategy and key competencies required to be successful in a global marketplace. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6379 Product Lifecycle Management (3 semester credit hours) This course provides a management approach to new product development, product lifecycle management and its impact on supply chain management. Topics include the management of product portfolio transitions, resources, schema and modeling for bills of materials, change management, and product cost management. (3-0) R

OPRE 6387 Models of Energy Markets (3 semester credit hours) Covers market models of energy markets for oil, natural gas, and electricity. A balance of theory and case study analysis is employed to give students an understanding of how theoretically formulated models can be applied to real world circumstances, and especially to current issues in global energy markets. Topics include models of supply and demand, market structure, transportation models, game theory strategies, risk management, environmental issues, policy and regulation, and dynamic optimization. (3-0) R

OPRE 6388 Engineering Packaged Goods Distribution (3 semester credit hours) This course covers both warehouse and DSD models of distribution common in CPG industry, in which network engineering design, distribution and replenishment planning and transportation planning / execution are performed. Students will also learn about unique distribution engineering aspects of returns, recycling, variety and display products and push/pull/hybrid delivery. In addition, this class focuses heavily on the practical operational aspects of distribution management through discussion and case studies. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6389 Managing Energy: Risk, Investment, Technology (MERIT) (3 semester credit hours) MERIT is designed for students or professionals interested in the energy sector. Energy sector houses applications from several academic disciplines: operations management, engineering and technology, risk management, economics, and finance. Students currently involved in these and similar academic programs can take MERIT to learn the fundamentals of the energy sector. (3-0) R

OPRE 6393 (ACCT 6320 and BUAN 6320 and MIS 6320) Database Foundations (3 semester credit hours) The course provides database knowledge for non-MIS business students to function effectively in their functional area. The course covers conceptual data modeling with the entity-relationship diagram, the fundamentals of relational data model and database queries, and the basic concepts of data warehousing. Structured Query Language will be used extensively. Applications of databases for accounting, finance, marketing, and other areas of business will be emphasized. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Information Technology and Management. Credit cannot be received for both courses, OPRE 6393 and MIS 6326. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6398 (BUAN 6398) Prescriptive Analytics (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to decision analysis and optimization techniques. Topics include linear programming, decision analysis, integer programming, and other optimization models. Applications of these models to business problems will be emphasized. (3-0) S

OPRE 6399 (BUAN 6324 and MIS 6324) Business Analytics With SAS (3 semester credit hours) This course covers theories and applications of business analytics. The focus is on extracting business intelligence from firms' business data for various applications, including (but not limited to) customer segmentation, customer relationship management (CRM), personalization, online recommendation systems, web mining, and product assortment. The emphasis is placed on the 'know-how' -- knowing how to extract and apply business analytics to improve business decision-making. Students will also acquire hands-on experience with business analytics software in the form of SAS Enterprise Miner. Credit cannot be received for both courses, OPRE 6399 and MIS 6356. (3-0) Y

OPRE 6V98 Supply Chain Management Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

OPRE 6V99 Special Topics in Operations Research (1-4 semester credit hours) May be lecture, readings or individualized study. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Department consent required. ([1-4]-0) S

OPRE 7051 Seminar in Operations Management (0 semester credit hours) The seminar covers topics of current research in the area of Operations Management. Research papers on a variety of topics are presented including supply chain management, inventory models, production planning and control, decision and risk analysis and behavioral operations management. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics may vary in coordination with OPRE7351. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7309 Behavioral Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) This course covers various topics in behavioral operations management including introduction to using laboratory experiments in operations, individual decisions, supply chain contracts and behavioral marked design in a seminar format. The main goal of the course is to expose students to behavioral research and gain deeper understanding of the limitations of the standard operations management paradigm. The main deliverable in the course will be a proposal for a laboratory study, including hypotheses, treatments and factors. Those who wish to pursue this research further will have an opportunity to conduct their studies with human subjects. (3-0) R

OPRE 7310 Probability and Stochastic Processes (3 semester credit hours) Basic concepts and methods from probability theory that are useful in the modeling of complex systems. Topics include Poisson and renewal processes, discrete and continuous-time Markov chains, semi-Markov processes, and various concepts of stochastic ordering. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7311 Stochastic Models in Operations Research (3 semester credit hours) This course is a systematic study of important classes of stochastic models in operation research. Topics include renewal theory, Markov chains, semi-Markov processes, queuing models, stochastic ordering concepts, and Brownian motion. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OPRE 7313 Network Flow (3 semester credit hours) Network flow models and solution algorithms. Matrix representations and properties, max-flow algorithms, min-cost flow algorithms, circulation and feasibility theorems, sensitivity analysis, integrality property of solutions, shortest route methods. Problems with special structure. CPT-PERT, multicommodity flows, matching, traveling salesperson problem. (3-0) T

OPRE 7315 Dynamic Programming (3 semester credit hours) This course is an introduction to both deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming. The basic ideas of recursion and functional equation will be introduced. A wide variety of applications will be used to illustrate these concepts. Specific topics include: Markov and Semi-Markov decision processes, principle of optimality, structure of optimal policies under various cost criteria, LP formulations, and policy-improvement techniques. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

OPRE 7320 Optimal Control Theory and Applications (3 semester credit hours) This course is an introduction to Optimal Control Theory and a survey of its selected applications in finance, production, marketing and economics. Relationships to dynamic programming and Kuhn-Tucker conditions are also pointed out. emphasis is on modeling and not on mathematical rigor. Students should have two semesters of calculus including some knowledge of differential equations and linear algebra or instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7330 Deterministic Models in Operations Research (3 semester credit hours) Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis and duality, assignment problems, network models, integer programming, nonlinear programming, sequencing and scheduling models. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7346 Differential Games and Applications (3 semester credit hours) Concepts and methods of game theory and differential games are presented, including both deterministic and stochastic models. The theory of necessary conditions, dynamic programming, and Nash equilibrium are discussed. Applications to economics and management are presented. Prerequisite: OPRE 7320 or instructor consent required. (3-0) T

OPRE 7351 Seminar in Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) This seminar covers topics of current research in the area of operations management. Research papers are presented on a variety of topics including: supply chain management, inventory models, production planning and control, design and scheduling of cellular manufacturing systems, and decision and risk analysis. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (18 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7352 Teaching Practicum in Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) Under the supervision of a faculty member, student assumes all instructional responsibilities for a course, including: developing the syllabus, delivering the lectures and grading. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (15 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7353 Optimization (3 semester credit hours) The course covers the fundamentals of optimization theory and introduces linear algebra and real analysis. Topics include existence of an optimal solution, unconstrained and constrained optima, convexity and quasi-convexity, and linear programming. Instructor consent required. (3-0) Y

OPRE 7372 Advanced Topics in Supply Networks - Advanced Risk Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course will focus on probabilistic, statistical and optimization techniques needed in risk analysis and decision-making. The domain is in full development and appropriate for active research. The methods are generic and applicable in finance as well as in operations management. Prerequisites: OPRE 6302 and OPRE 6330 and OPRE 6366 and instructor consent required. (3-0) R

Real Estate

REAL 6321 (FIN 6321) Introduction to Real Estate (3 semester credit hours) Overview of various aspects of real estate markets, including marketing, finance, taxation, development, law, appraisal, investment, valuation and real estate participants. (3-0) S

REAL 6322 (FIN 6322) Real Estate Finance and Investment (3 semester credit hours) This course covers commercial real estate investment analysis and instruments used in its finance. Topics include: real estate valuation, loan structures, syndication, securitization, and developments in capital markets affecting real estate developments. Prerequisite: FIN 6301. (3-0) S

REAL 6323 (FIN 6323) Real Estate Market Analysis and Investment (3 semester credit hours) This course provides insight into market analysis and research including local and economic base analysis with case studies on specific commercial investment property types. This course also applies modern technologies to assist in performing these analyses. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6321 or REAL 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6322. (3-0) Y

REAL 6324 (FIN 6324) Real Estate Development (3 semester credit hours) An in depth course covering issues faced in the development process including market analysis, government approvals, financing and risk assessment. Prerequisite: FIN 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6321 or REAL 6322. (3-0) R

REAL 6326 (FIN 6326) Real Estate Law and Contracts (3 semester credit hours) Study of the legal principles governing real estate transactions, with an emphasis on promulgated contracts. Topics include contract law, tax law, leases, estates in land, types of ownership, deeds, mortgages, title insurance, agency and homestead. Prerequisite or Corequisite: FIN 6321 or REAL 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6322. (3-0) Y

REAL 6328 (FIN 6328) Real Estate Valuation (3 semester credit hours) This capstone real estate course provides an in-depth study, application and evaluation of the theory and methods of residential and commercial property valuation and appraisal. Topics include the three major approaches to appraising real estate, regression analysis, market analysis, highest and best use analysis and capitalization techniques, with an emphasis on income properties. Several cases and problems are presented and solved. Prerequisite: FIN 6321 or FIN 6322 or REAL 6321 or REAL 6322. (3-0) R

Systems Engineering and Management

SYSM 6301 (MECH 6337) Systems Engineering, Architecture and Design (3 semester credit hours) Architecture and design of large-scale and decentralized systems from technical and management perspectives. Systems architectures, requirements analysis, design tradeoffs, and reliability through case studies and mathematical techniques. International standardization bodies, engineering frameworks, processes, notations, and tool support from both theoretical and practical perspectives. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6302 (BMEN 6302 and EECS 6302 and MECH 6317) Dynamics of Complex Networks and Systems (3 semester credit hours) Design and analysis of complex interconnected networks and systems. Basic concepts in graph theory; Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs; traveling salesman problems; random graphs; power laws; small world networks; clustering; introduction to dynamical systems; stability; chaos and fractals. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6303 (OPRE 6301) Quantitative Introduction to Risk and Uncertainty in Business (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to statistical and probabilistic methods and theory applicable to situations faced by managers. Topics include: data presentation and summarization, regression analysis, fundamental probability theory and random variables, introductory decision analysis, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and One Way ANOVA (Some sections of this class may require a laptop computer). (3-0) S

SYSM 6304 (OPRE 6335) Risk and Decision Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course provides an overview of the main concepts and methods of risk assessment, risk management, and decision analysis. The methods used in industry, such as probabilistic risk assessment, six sigma, and reliability, are discussed. Advanced methods from economics and finance (decision optimization and portfolio analysis) are presented. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301 or SYSM 6303. (3-0) T

SYSM 6305 (MECH 6318) Optimization Theory and Practice (3 semester credit hours) Basics of optimization theory, numerical algorithms, and applications. The course is divided into three main parts: linear programming (simplex method, duality theory), unconstrained methods (optimality conditions, descent algorithms and convergence theorems), and constrained minimization (Lagrange multipliers, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions, active set, penalty and interior point methods). Applications in engineering, operations, finance, statistics, etc. will be emphasized. Students will also use Matlab's optimization toolbox to obtain practical experience with the material. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6306 (BMEN 6372 and MECH 6314) Engineering Systems: Modeling and Simulation (3 semester credit hours) This course will present principles of computational modeling and simulation of systems. General topics covered include: parametric and non-parametric modeling; system simulation; parameter estimation, linear regression and least squares; model structure and model validation through simulation; and, numerical issues in systems theory. Techniques covered include methods from numerical linear algebra, nonlinear programming and Monte Carlo simulation, with applications to general engineering systems. Modeling and simulation software is utilized (MATLAB/SIMULINK). (3-0) Y

SYSM 6307 (EECS 6331 and MECH 6300) Linear Systems (3 semester credit hours) State space methods of analysis and design for linear dynamical systems. Coordinate transformations and tools from advanced linear algebra. Controllability and observability. Lyapunov stability analysis. Pole assignment, stabilizability, detectability. State estimation for deterministic models, observers. Introduction to the optimal linear quadratic regulator problem. Prerequisites: ENGR 2300 and EE 4310 or MECH 4310 or equivalent. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6308 (CS 6356 and SE 6356) Software Maintenance, Evolution, and Re-Engineering (3 semester credit hours) Principles and techniques of software maintenance. Impact of software development process on software justifiability, maintainability, evolvability, and planning of release cycles. Use of very high-level languages and dependencies for forward engineering and reverse engineering. Achievements, pitfalls, and trends in software reuse, reverse engineering, and re-engineering. Prerequisite: CE 5354 or CS 5354 or SE 5354. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6309 (CS 6361 and SE 6361) Advanced Requirements Engineering (3 semester credit hours) System and software requirements engineering. Identification, elicitation, modeling, analysis, specification, management, and evolution of functional and non-functional requirements. Strengths and weaknesses of different techniques, tools, and object-oriented methodologies. Interactions and trade-offs among hardware, software, and organization. System and sub-system integration with software and organization as components of complex, composite systems. Transition from requirements to design. Critical issues in requirements engineering. Prerequisite: CE 5354 or CS 5354 or SE 5354. (3-0) S

SYSM 6310 (CE 6367 and CS 6367 and SE 6367) Software Testing, Validation and Verification (3 semester credit hours) Fundamental concepts of software testing. Functional testing. GUI based testing tools. Control flow based test adequacy criteria. Data flow based test adequacy criteria. White box based testing tools. Mutation testing and testing tools. Relationship between test adequacy criteria. Finite state machine based testing. Static and dynamic program slicing for testing and debugging. Software reliability. Formal verification of program correctness. Prerequisite: CE 5354 or CS 5354 or SE 5354. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6311 (OPRE 6362) Systems Project Management in Engineering and Operations (3 semester credit hours) Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing and managing resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives. The course will cover various aspects of managing projects in engineering and operations environments including the critical path methods for planning and controlling projects, time and cost tradeoffs, resource utilization, organizational design, conflict resolution and stochastic considerations. (3-0) S

SYSM 6312 (FIN 6301) Systems Financial Management (3 semester credit hours) Develops the basic concepts of finance with particular attention to their application to the financial management of companies. Prerequisites or Corequisites: OPRE 6301 and (ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6305). (3-0) S

SYSM 6313 (HMGT 6324 and MECO 6352 and OB 6332) Systems Negotiation and Dispute Resolution (3 semester credit hours) This course explores the theories, processes, and practical techniques of negotiation so that students can successfully negotiate and resolve disputes in a variety of situations including interpersonal, group, and international settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding influence and conflict resolution strategies; identifying interests, issues, and positions of the parties involved; analyzing co-negotiators, their negotiation styles, and the negotiation situations; and managing the dynamics associated with most negotiations. Practical skills are developed through the use of simulations and exercises. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6315 (ENTP 6398) The Entrepreneurial Experience (3 semester credit hours) This course is designed to provide student teams with practical experience in the investigation, evaluation and recommendation of technology and/or market entry strategies for a significant new business opportunity. Projects will be defined by the faculty and will generally focus on emerging market opportunities defined by new technologies of interest to a sponsoring corporate partner. Teams will be comprised of management and engineering graduate students, mentored by faculty and representatives of the partnering company. Evaluation will be based on papers, presentations and other deliverables defined on a case-by-case basis. Instructor consent required. (3-0) R

SYSM 6316 (ENTP 6388) Managing Innovation within the Corporation (3 semester credit hours) Innovators and entrepreneurs within established corporations combine innovation, creativity and leadership to develop and launch new products, new product lines and new business units that grow revenues and profits from within. The course seeks to equip students with the skills and perspectives required to initiate new ventures and create viable businesses in dynamic and uncertain environments in the face of organizational inertia and other sources of resistance to innovation. Course topics include the elements of strategic analysis and positioning for competitive advantage in dynamic markets, and the structuring, utilization and mobilization of the internal resources of existing firms in the pursuit of growth and new market opportunities. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6318 (MKT 6301) Marketing Management (3 semester credit hours) Overview of marketing management methods, principles and concepts including product, pricing, promotion and distribution decisions as well as segmentation, targeting and positioning. (3-0) S

SYSM 6319 (MECO 6303) Business Economics (3 semester credit hours) Foundations of the economic analysis of business problems, with special emphasis on the operation of markets and the macroeconomy. Prerequisite: OPRE 6303 or equivalent. (3-0) S

SYSM 6320 (BPS 6332) Strategic Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Addresses the challenge of leading organizations in dynamic and challenging environments. Overall goal is to not only question one's assumptions about leadership, but also enhance skills and acquire new content knowledge. Topics include visionary and transformational leadership, post-heroic leadership, empowerment, leveraging and combining resources, designing organizations and ethics. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6321 Financial Engineering (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to finance and investments from an engineering perspective. Focuses on the principles underlying financial decision making which are applicable to all forms of investment: stocks, bonds, real estate, project budgeting, corporate finance, and more. Intended for students with strong technical backgrounds who are comfortable with mathematical arguments. Primary components are deterministic finance (interest rates, bonds, and simple cash flow analysis) and single period uncertainty finance (portfolios of stocks and pricing theory). Prerequisites: Courses in engineering calculus, probability and linear algebra. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6325 Requirements Development and Integration for Complex Systems (3 semester credit hours) Building on the premise that systems engineering is the glue that holds complex programs together, this course will teach the foundations of effective requirements development for complex systems. Students will learn principles and techniques used for early lifecycle development of system requirements. Additional topics will include an understanding of impacts of reliability, availability, maintainability, supportability, and transportability (RAMS-T) on complex systems, though deterministic and stochastic modeling and analysis, and effective system integration planning. Practical skills are developed through the use of case studies and a significant group project. Prerequisite or Corequisite: SYSM 6301. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6326 Systems Lifecycle Cost Analysis (3 semester credit hours) This course will provide an understanding of system lifecycle cost analysis concepts (also known as systems affordability) and the lifecycle cost process. The course will examine the importance of using these concepts when attempting to make the best possible engineering and business decisions. The concepts will include special emphasis on the analysis and evaluation of alternatives by collectively weighing costs, risks, reliability, weight, performance, and other benefit/risk parameters. Topics will include total ownership cost, various estimating methods and techniques (including sensitivity and some risk analysis), cost analysis process, system trade studies, and system cost effectiveness. The course will culminate with guided research related to the application of these concepts on student-focused subjects. Prerequisite: SYSM 6301. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6327 Systems Reliability (3 semester credit hours) This course will provide an advanced understanding of reliability analysis of complex systems, including many of its extended analysis focus areas like availability, maintainability, and supportability (RAMS). Course analysis variables include stress under various conditions, the use of degradation data, relationships between accelerated stresses and normal operating conditions, dependency failures, repairable and non-repairable components, preventive maintenance, replacement and inspection, and accelerated life reliability models, to name a few. The course will also address important reliability metrics, and the impact of reliability in the design, development and management of organizations. Prerequisite: SYSM 6301. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6332 (ENTP 6375) Technology and New Product Development (3 semester credit hours) This course addresses the strategic and organizational issues confronted by firms in technology-intensive environments. The course reflects six broad themes: (1) managing firms in technology-intensive industries; (2) forecasting key industry and technology trends; (3) linking technology and business strategies; (4) using technology as a source of competitive advantage; (5) organizing firms to achieve these goals; and (6) implementing new technologies in organizations. Students will analyze actual situations in organizations and summarize their findings and recommendations in an in-depth term paper. Case studies and class participation are stressed. (3-0) Y

SYSM 6333 (OB 6301) Systems Organizational Behavior (3 semester credit hours) The study of human behavior in organizations. Emphasizes theoretical concepts and practical methods for understanding, analyzing, and predicting individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include work motivation, group dynamics, decision making, conflict and negotiation, leadership, power, and organizational culture. Ethical and international considerations are also addressed. (3-0) S

SYSM 6334 (OPRE 6302) Systems Operations Management (3 semester credit hours) Operations Management integrates all of the activities and processes that are necessary to provide products and services. This course overviews methods and models that help managers make better operating decisions over time. How these methods will allow firms to operate both manufacturing and service facilities in order to compete in a global environment will also be discussed. Prerequisite: OPRE 6301. (3-0) S

SYSM 6335 (BUAN 6335) Organizing for Business Analytics: A Systems Approach (3 semester credit hours) The course develops conceptual understanding of business analytics and key business drivers that lead to business initiatives. The course takes a systems and organizational approach and examines how decision-makers in key functional areas of an enterprise rely on business analytics, how they develop analytical techniques, and how key roles are played by business analytics professionals. The course also emphasizes developing the business case for analytics through defining and executing strategy and addresses how to successfully integrate analytical processes, technologies, and people in all aspects of business operations. (3-0) T

SYSM 6336 Earned Value Management System (3 semester credit hours) This course introduces the earned value management (EVM) concept as a management tool for effective project administration which allows project teams to have a solid visibility in terms of cost, schedule, and technical progress of a project or program. This course investigates the practical application of EVM for any size project and explains how all project activities are planned, budgeted, and scheduled in time-phased increments and how the project performance is measured. The EVM approach allows managers to develop a project framework to handle the competing requirements of managing limited resources and meeting a fixed duration. Instructor consent required. (3-0) T

SYSM 6337 (ACCT 6305) Accounting for Managers (3 semester credit hours) Fundamental concepts in accounting and financial reporting are presented from the perspective of business managers. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements in MS Accounting. Credit cannot be received for both courses, (ACCT 6201 or ACCT 6202) and ACCT 6305. (3-0) S

SYSM 6V70 Research In Systems Engineering and Management (3-9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit (15 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([3-9]-0) R

SYSM 6V80 Special Topics in Systems Engineering and Management (1-6 semester credit hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([1-6]-0) S

SYSM 6V90 Thesis (3-9 semester credit hours) Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit (15 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. ([3-9]-0) S

SYSM 6V98 Systems Engineering and Management Internship (1-3 semester credit hours) Student gains experience and improves skills through appropriate developmental work assignments in a real business environment. Student must identify and submit specific business learning objectives at the beginning of the semester. The student must demonstrate exposure to the managerial perspective via involvement or observation. At semester end, student prepares an oral or poster presentation, or a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student performance is evaluated by the work supervisor. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (3 semester credit hours maximum). SEM Program Director, the School of Engineering Internship Coordinator, and JSOM Internship Coordinator consent required. ([1-3]-0) S

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